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Scotland Subsidises England


gruffydd

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Guest The Relaxation Suite

The problem this guy has is that if you look carefully at the border between Scotland and England, it actually leaves the country at a angle, and therefore goes out to see at an angle. Many of the oil rigs the Scots think are theirs are actually English,and they make this mistake because they draw the border at 90 degrees across the North Sea. Right now, as everything is just "British" it's no big deal, but if they were separate countries then this is what wars are fought over. And Scotland would lose, obviously.

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If Scotland subsidises England, which I so much hope it does, maybe someone is gonna be along in a minute to give us some hard numbers rather than some fatuous link to some git with a beard and nothing else.

If it weren't for Scotland, the England and Wales strategic shortbread reserve would last less than eight days.

Shove that in your fact hole.

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The problem this guy has is that if you look carefully at the border between Scotland and England, it actually leaves the country at a angle, and therefore goes out to see at an angle. Many of the oil rigs the Scots think are theirs are actually English,and they make this mistake because they draw the border at 90 degrees across the North Sea. Right now, as everything is just "British" it's no big deal, but if they were separate countries then this is what wars are fought over. And Scotland would lose, obviously.

I could agree with you but then we'd both be wrong ;)

The North Sea Continental Shelf agreement placed the border of territorial waters at 90 degrees, aligned with the parallels of latitude.

There was however an interesting chart released in 1997, after 30 years, that had been placed before Callagham in 1977 which had exactly as you propose with the the border off Aberdeen beach ! Worse for Scotland the bulk of fields would actually have been in Shetland waters who have their own independance claim.

In 1999 the border was in fact redrawn, taking in some of the southern central fields, Fulmar, Auk, Janice etc into English waters.

Given the exploration plays being worked at the moment in the northern central north sea, the outer Moray Firth and on the Atlantic Margin, 90% of them would be in Scottish water in anycase.

It will be an interesting debate if Scottish independance was to come, given the total oil tax revenues over the last 30 years of 242 billion GBP at todays prices however the North Sea as an oil province is very mature well off the peak production plateau and in decline.

The future potential is totally dependant on the oil price, too low for too long and the oil will stay in the ground, possibly never extracted due to the aging infrastructure. If you think of the fields discovered in the 70's as elephants, whats now being called significant would be mouse sized.

The current oil price is excellent for the industry and by default the tax raised. Aberdeen is picking up, day rates are up, more jobs, long may it continue.

I've attached an article which explains the issue.

http://energy.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/2074557

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I could agree with you but then we'd both be wrong ;)

The North Sea Continental Shelf agreement placed the border of territorial waters at 90 degrees, aligned with the parallels of latitude.

There was however an interesting chart released in 1997, after 30 years, that had been placed before Callagham in 1977 which had exactly as you propose with the the border off Aberdeen beach ! Worse for Scotland the bulk of fields would actually have been in Shetland waters who have their own independance claim.

In 1999 the border was in fact redrawn, taking in some of the southern central fields, Fulmar, Auk, Janice etc into English waters.

Given the exploration plays being worked at the moment in the northern central north sea, the outer Moray Firth and on the Atlantic Margin, 90% of them would be in Scottish water in anycase.

It will be an interesting debate if Scottish independance was to come, given the total oil tax revenues over the last 30 years of 242 billion GBP at todays prices however the North Sea as an oil province is very mature well off the peak production plateau and in decline.

The future potential is totally dependant on the oil price, too low for too long and the oil will stay in the ground, possibly never extracted due to the aging infrastructure. If you think of the fields discovered in the 70's as elephants, whats now being called significant would be mouse sized.

The current oil price is excellent for the industry and by default the tax raised. Aberdeen is picking up, day rates are up, more jobs, long may it continue.

I've attached an article which explains the issue.

http://energy.pressa...le.aspx/2074557

The really big question come into the debate between Formerly British, Noggy and cloggy fields, especially once combined with the orkneys.

While Britain retains the big guns, the Scotch might come off pretty badly against the Dutch/Norwegian coalition... especially if England did decide it wanted a slice after all.

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Guys if you think Scotland is a drain on the UK you should all go to your MP and ask them to support Scottish independence problem solved

There is more support for Scottish independence in England than Scotland. Give the English the vote, or the Scottish and lets have it done.

Of course Scotland would go bankrupt immediately with its Scottish bank debts.

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I thought it was the other way round, that we English subsidise the Scots. Anyway, we should all see ourselves as BRITISH and stop wasting so much collective mental energy on trying to prove how different we are from each other. I mean, I've even heard Scottish people on the radio asserting that 'Scots' is a separate language from English because there are lots of different words (and they're talking about the Scottish dialects of English, not Gaelic, which definitely IS a different language). But, I mean, honestly......."a wee beastie in ma soup" ..... "wee" and "beastie" are English words, they just happen to be used a lot more in general conversation by the Scots.

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