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Realistbear

Germany To Agree More Qe Beyond The 750,000,000,000 Bn Already Agreed

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http://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/Germany-agree-expand-750bn-tele-4027825119.html?x=0

13:22, Monday 10 January 2011
Germany may soften its opposition to expanding the eurozone's €750bn rescue facility, Bloomberg reported on Monday, as Belgium’s political deadlock sent borrowing costs surging and the European Central Bank bought Portuguese bonds.
Portuguese sovereign debt came under pressure in early trading, after the country's president was forced to deny the need for a €80bn (£66bn) bail-out.

Looks like it wasn't all contained last summer as they claimed.

I can see another 750bn coming off the presses very soon--and that is if Spain stays out of trouble.

Will Germany see it through or pull the plug on the Euro?

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Clash in Bangladesh as stocks dive

Police fire tear gas as thousands rally in capital, Dhaka, to vent their anger at record 9.25 per cent plunge in stocks.

Trading has been halted at Bangladesh's main stock exchange amid protests over the largest single day loss in the bourse's 55-year history.

The exchange halted trading on Monday as per orders from the Securities and Exchange Commission after the benchmark index plunged 9.25 per cent within the first hour of trading.

2011110104023556797_20.jpg

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bad timing for Iceland

Jan. 10 (Bloomberg) -- Iceland is planning its first Eurobond sale since 2006 as 713 million euros ($920 million) of debt matures, forcing the government to test international capital markets two years after its financial system collapsed.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-01-10/iceland-plans-first-post-crash-eurobonds-as-debts-due.html

Just remind me...how many people live in Iceland??

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Yield rises were through the roof today, and then fell back. Presumably this was on the back of ECB purchases?

Are they financing all of this with printed money? Do they expect to get paid back?

What are the implications of a central bank holding the bonds of a nation that cannot pay?

I know that the UK doesnt have a problem, as it can just print what it owes. But how does that work in the Eurozone?

I mean say I borrowed 1 euro, which the ECB buys. Then I default. The ECB has unwittingly given me 1 Euro of printed money, devaluing all other Euros in existence.

If I have defaulted, will the ECB lend me more money? It shouldnt, but arent they supposed to come to the aid of a brother in trouble?

I think that the whole point of the arguments going before the constitutional court in Germany is that the ECB is now a monster, rampaging around, trying to fix the problems of debtor nations by printing money, when the solution is to let the nations default if they cannot pay. It has become the inflation inducing problem.

Does anyone have any inside track on what the ECB is really up to?

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Yield rises were through the roof today, and then fell back. Presumably this was on the back of ECB purchases?

Are they financing all of this with printed money? Do they expect to get paid back?

What are the implications of a central bank holding the bonds of a nation that cannot pay?

I know that the UK doesnt have a problem, as it can just print what it owes. But how does that work in the Eurozone?

I mean say I borrowed 1 euro, which the ECB buys. Then I default. The ECB has unwittingly given me 1 Euro of printed money, devaluing all other Euros in existence.

If I have defaulted, will the ECB lend me more money? It shouldnt, but arent they supposed to come to the aid of a brother in trouble?

I think that the whole point of the arguments going before the constitutional court in Germany is that the ECB is now a monster, rampaging around, trying to fix the problems of debtor nations by printing money, when the solution is to let the nations default if they cannot pay. It has become the inflation inducing problem.

Does anyone have any inside track on what the ECB is really up to?

Yes. They are drowning in debt and the individual member states who have a chnace of survival are weighing their options. Either way there will be a severe recession or depression so they have to go for the best option for the longer term. The Q for them is to decide if its a poltically viable policy to keep giving monmey away to no-hopers.

IMO, the Euro as we know it is finished.

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Yes. They are drowning in debt and the individual member states who have a chnace of survival are weighing their options. Either way there will be a severe recession or depression so they have to go for the best option for the longer term. The Q for them is to decide if its a poltically viable policy to keep giving monmey away to no-hopers.

IMO, the Euro as we know it is finished.

I have been wondering about this.

Are physical assets in Germany financed with long term, fixed rate debt in Euros a good thing or not?

A bit like the Hungarians taking out Euro mortgages but in reverse ....

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Yield rises were through the roof today, and then fell back. Presumably this was on the back of ECB purchases?

Are they financing all of this with printed money? Do they expect to get paid back?

What are the implications of a central bank holding the bonds of a nation that cannot pay?

I know that the UK doesnt have a problem, as it can just print what it owes. But how does that work in the Eurozone?

I mean say I borrowed 1 euro, which the ECB buys. Then I default. The ECB has unwittingly given me 1 Euro of printed money, devaluing all other Euros in existence.

If I have defaulted, will the ECB lend me more money? It shouldnt, but arent they supposed to come to the aid of a brother in trouble?

I think that the whole point of the arguments going before the constitutional court in Germany is that the ECB is now a monster, rampaging around, trying to fix the problems of debtor nations by printing money, when the solution is to let the nations default if they cannot pay. It has become the inflation inducing problem.

Does anyone have any inside track on what the ECB is really up to?

fingernails scraping down a blackboard is the sound we are hearing as those Entitled to very high salaries and perks are trying to preserve their own lifestyles at the expense of the great unshaved.

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Ive posted this in a thread, awaiting mod approval.

Clash in Bangladesh as stocks dive

Police fire tear gas as thousands rally in capital, Dhaka, to vent their anger at record 9.25 per cent plunge in stocks.

Trading has been halted at Bangladesh's main stock exchange amid protests over the largest single day loss in the bourse's 55-year history.

The exchange halted trading on Monday as per orders from the Securities and Exchange Commission after the benchmark index plunged 9.25 per cent within the first hour of trading.

2011110104023556797_20.jpg

Well spotted.

Otherwise I fear this news regarding one of the worlds greatest financial centres would have gone unnoticed.

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http://blogs.ft.com/beyond-brics/2011/01/10/guest-post-bubble-trouble-in-bangladesh/

On the one hand, one can sympathize with a view that there is a need to avoid disorderly market conditions even if a correction is warranted. On the other hand, over-frequent regulatory interventions reinforce moral hazard.

A complicating factor is that the number of retail investors has increased from around 500,000 in 2007 to around 3.5m today. These 3m new investors have only really known a bull market and are barely aware of the near 80 per cent correction in Bangladesh stocks during the 1996/7 crash.

Yes, the index today is off 27 per cent from the high seen on December 5, 2010. But this has to be seen in the context of a 80 per cent-plus gain in 2010 and a gain of around 400 per cent for the DGEN since the beginning of 2007.

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That Bangladesh 9.25% fall is interesting... bit like gold last week... jittery signs that on their own mean nothing... but the same thing happened in the months and weeks prior to the 1929 Crash.

Stock market crashes are generally preceded by increased volatility. :ph34r:

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Ive posted this in a thread, awaiting mod approval.

Clash in Bangladesh as stocks dive

Police fire tear gas as thousands rally in capital, Dhaka, to vent their anger at record 9.25 per cent plunge in stocks.

Didn't even know Bangladesh had a stock market! unsure.gif

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The 750,000,000,000 Bn Already Agreed

Di you think by putting loads of zero's it will look more exciting? Or maybe you don't know what 7.5 Billion, Billion is called. Its a Quintillion.

Edited by Peter Hun

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Di you think by putting loads of zero's it will look more exciting? Or maybe you don't know what 7.5 Billion, Billion is called. Its a Quintillion.

I was waiting for someone to notice that but thought it would have turned out to be Pedantic Pete!

The big load of zeros certainly makes it look for exciting and brings home the huge sum involved. LIfe can be so dull sometimes and a bit of spice adds flavour to our otherwise dreary lives as we all wait for a mega crash.

Edited by Realistbear

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bad timing for Iceland

Jan. 10 (Bloomberg) -- Iceland is planning its first Eurobond sale since 2006 as 713 million euros ($920 million) of debt matures, forcing the government to test international capital markets two years after its financial system collapsed.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-01-10/iceland-plans-first-post-crash-eurobonds-as-debts-due.html

Just remind me...how many people live in Iceland??

About 320,000

There are more people in Bristol than Iceland.

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Yes. They are drowning in debt and the individual member states who have a chnace of survival are weighing their options. Either way there will be a severe recession or depression so they have to go for the best option for the longer term. The Q for them is to decide if its a poltically viable policy to keep giving monmey away to no-hopers.

IMO, the Euro as we know it is finished.

...I wouldn't let it worry you so.....we all have to die at some point. ;)

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...I wouldn't let it worry you so.....we all have to die at some point. ;)

Sometimes, when the bad news gets too much for me, I take comfort in the fact that so does Gordon Brown (and probably long before me.)

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Yes. They are drowning in debt and the individual member states who have a chnace of survival are weighing their options. Either way there will be a severe recession or depression so they have to go for the best option for the longer term. The Q for them is to decide if its a poltically viable policy to keep giving monmey away to no-hopers.

IMO, the Euro as we know it is finished.

Don't know how many time I have read this from you. You are exhausting, why are you so worried about the EUR? Do you own much EUR? Isn't there enough to worry about in the UK? You either post something about the USD being finished or EUR being finished!

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Don't know how many time I have read this from you. You are exhausting, why are you so worried about the EUR? Do you own much EUR? Isn't there enough to worry about in the UK? You either post something about the USD being finished or EUR being finished!

**snigger**

you haven't been here long have you? just stick moronbear on 'ignore' like the rest of us!

RB is heavily into the US $ and thinks that it will be OK

annual US deficits of $2 trillion a year says they won't :ph34r:

this year will be the most volatile for a long time - but it won't stop moronbear posting everytime there is a movement up or down in some currency or other...

the army have a name for people like him. they are called 'walts' i.e. walter mitty types.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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