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If I Keep Wondering 'how Can People Afford Private School?'


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Why not just let people spend their own money on their kids if they so choose, eh?

Because obviously everyone else has a *right* to tell you who you can pay money to educate your children.

Seriously, they actually believe that. And while those people busy themselves with such nonsense, other people get on with doing things and move forward.

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The first choice college will rarely make a binding decision sufficiently soon to cancel the second-choice interview(s). Even then, at least in some subjects there is a policy of interviewing even applicants who already have a place elsewhere. That way the scores awarded by different colleges become comparable, and this helps make borderline decisions fairer.

Form of interviews

Most interviews take place in the first three weeks of December (though some may be earlier) so please don’t make any unbreakable commitments for this period.

The exact form and length of interviews varies from College to College, and between subjects, but typically you’ll have two interviews of 20–30 minutes each. Your College will send you full details, explaining what will be involved. You may be asked to stay overnight, in which case the College will provide accommodation.

After the interviews, there are three possible outcomes.

1. You’re made an offer

2. Your application is ‘pooled’

Although impressed by your application, your College may not have a place for you or they may want to look at applicants to other Colleges before confirming their last offers. As such, they may decide to put your application into the winter pool.

The ‘winter pool’ is held in January and is designed to ensure that the best applicants are offered places, regardless of the College they originally applied or were allocated to. All Colleges can consider pooled applicants and Directors of Studies in each subject meet during the interview period to discuss the overall standard of applications, so that they can see by January how their own College’s applicants compare.

If your application is pooled, you may be:

asked to attend a further interview in early January at another College (allowing for AS/A level module assessments held during this time)

offered a place at another College without a further interview

contacted by the College you applied to/were allocated to, normally by the end of January, if no College is able to offer you a place

Around one in five applicants are pooled, and, of these, around one in four receives an offer of a place.

3. Your application is unsuccessful

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Form of interviews

Most interviews take place in the first three weeks of December (though some may be earlier) so please don’t make any unbreakable commitments for this period.

The exact form and length of interviews varies from College to College, and between subjects, but typically you’ll have two interviews of 20–30 minutes each. Your College will send you full details, explaining what will be involved. You may be asked to stay overnight, in which case the College will provide accommodation.

After the interviews, there are three possible outcomes.

1. You’re made an offer

2. Your application is ‘pooled’

Although impressed by your application, your College may not have a place for you or they may want to look at applicants to other Colleges before confirming their last offers. As such, they may decide to put your application into the winter pool.

The ‘winter pool’ is held in January and is designed to ensure that the best applicants are offered places, regardless of the College they originally applied or were allocated to. All Colleges can consider pooled applicants and Directors of Studies in each subject meet during the interview period to discuss the overall standard of applications, so that they can see by January how their own College’s applicants compare.

If your application is pooled, you may be:

asked to attend a further interview in early January at another College (allowing for AS/A level module assessments held during this time)

offered a place at another College without a further interview

contacted by the College you applied to/were allocated to, normally by the end of January, if no College is able to offer you a place

Around one in five applicants are pooled, and, of these, around one in four receives an offer of a place.

3. Your application is unsuccessful

This is the Cambridge process. The Oxford process is as described above by MongerofDoom -- it differs in that candidates for Oxford may be asked to interview at two (or sometimes more, depending on the chosen subject) colleges at the same time: the first and second choice colleges (and sometimes an additional college) may see the candidate during the same 2-3 days, and if the first choice college does not wish to make an offer the second choice college may do so. Oxford does not operate a 'winter pool' system as Cambridge does.

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Part of my reasoning for this is the sheer inaccuracies you get when teachers teach children about subjects. Sometimes, the information is just plain wrong (rubbish about the Suffragettes and female emancipation are my particular bugbear).

That was my area of interest at degree level. There's a real lot of c0ck talked about Victorian feminism, but no-one wants to hear it.

Another interesting one is the reported evidence for Martin Luther King's penchant for orgies and abuse of women. Had some interesting discussions with American black feminists about that one...

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This is a really interesting comment.

I am an ex-secondary school English teacher, and have taught in Britain and in Europe, both GCSE and IGCSE, and I have to say I am not totally sure of the real merit of many GCSE courses at all -- and I would include English literature and history in that. I really do not know why we teach Shakespeare at 14/15/16.

These days, and I know this is really weird, I do think that what would be far more beneficial would be to go back to the medieval and classical concept of teaching the trivium -- grammar, logic and rhetoric -- and then renew the old quadrivium so that it covered maths, science (including chemistry, biology, physics and geology), a foreign language and art/music (and I say this having gone to a bog-standard comprehensive).

But then I was always very focused on the idea that education should teach children how to do something (construct an argument, think critically, write a polemic, work out the angle of a triangle, speak French, play an instrument), rather than teach them about something ("in 1441, so and so did this").

Part of my reasoning for this is the sheer inaccuracies you get when teachers teach children about subjects. Sometimes, the information is just plain wrong (rubbish about the Suffragettes and female emancipation are my particular bugbear).

+1 This is spot on.There has been a strong drift from "how" to "what" in the past 40 years. One almost believes that it is policy not to teach people to think.

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Isle of Wight private school 'Ryde Private' has seen numerous drops in intakes and existing pupils being pulled and placed into state schools.

I do believe that teachers at private schools do not need teacher training to obtain a teaching post.

Pure snobbery.

Kids who have gone to private schools seem to do better at most exams, get into better universities etc etc.

You state that teachers at private schools "do not need teacher training". Others on this thread have stated similar things, including that the teachers (being unqualified) work for less pay than at state schools.

How do people square these allusions to the teachers being so inferior at private schools with the higher results that they apparently achieve?

Don't private schools pay more to their teachers? And in fact demand that they definitely know their subjects, in order to teach them well and result in far more of their pupils getting better results?

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Don't private schools pay more to their teachers? And in fact demand that they definitely know their subjects, in order to teach them well and result in far more of their pupils getting better results?

Caveat emptor I am afraid. Quality of private schools range from excellent to rubbish (though these won't last for very long and hence an average private school is likely

to be quite a bit better than an average state school, otherwise, there is no reason for them to exist.).

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Because obviously everyone else has a *right* to tell you who you can pay money to educate your children.

Seriously, they actually believe that. And while those people busy themselves with such nonsense, other people get on with doing things and move forward.

I cant think of an real reason why a state school should be worse than a fee paying school.

I guess public sector waste needs to be factored in.

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Because if life is a competition for scarce resources - the playing field needs to be levelled out for the purposes of a fair society.

You and your family are trying to out compete and outgun other equally deserving families - that is of course natural. There is more than just your family to consider - hard though that is for you to accept.

It is the twin poison of competition between us and the evil of credit that has led to the house price boom and bust. Sometimes these arms races need to have a SALT treaty between us to stop them.

If people can see that things are set up fairly it leads to a more harmonious society - something that is sorely missing in this country.

This is getting off topic, but I don't see that you can have a fair society if you have money. It's not fair that I was born in the UK and can earn a good living, whilst someone born in say a Mumbai slum has far less chances. To make things truly fair, there would be no borders and free movement of people. This country is fairer than most. I was working a lot in Kuwait last year which has a very unfair society.

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I cant think of an real reason why a state school should be worse than a fee paying school.

I guess public sector waste needs to be factored in.

I think it is that it is mostly about selection.

Self selection on the parents behalf and selection of pupils at entrance. Troublesome pupils can be expelled. So basically you end up with a school with more motivated pupils and parents, because you have selected the rest out.

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I think it is that it is mostly about selection.

Self selection on the parents behalf and selection of pupils at entrance. Troublesome pupils can be expelled. So basically you end up with a school with more motivated pupils and parents, because you have selected the rest out.

Also more motivated better paid teaching staff. If you don't teach well you get sacked.

Another factor is higher expectations, so pupils (and parents) work harder.

Only state schools that match good independent schools in terms of results are grammars. The best comprehensives in our area score around 80%-85% on the 5 A-Cs, whereas all the independents and grammars score 99%-100%. The worst comprehensives score around 40%.

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Also more motivated better paid teaching staff. If you don't teach well you get sacked.

Another factor is higher expectations, so pupils (and parents) work harder.

Only state schools that match good independent schools in terms of results are grammars. The best comprehensives in our area score around 80%-85% on the 5 A-Cs, whereas all the independents and grammars score 99%-100%. The worst comprehensives score around 40%.

school was much easier in my day...today, its way to pressurised.

Life if for living.

Putting kids in to a forced education, sounds like hell.

smacks of putting your 4 year old girl into beauty pageants, montesauri nurseries to "get ahead", and so on.

My kids could both read by the time they started school...thanks to Mrs Loo...they both gave up books until they left the system...

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My personal plan is to send any kids I am fortunate to have to state school and then, for the cost of my own time, also give them a bit of home education I'd expect be better than private school. I love teaching people things, always teaching my girlfriend stuff, and would probably be obsessed with teaching my kids stuff.

Are you sure your girlfriend respects that? My mother still laughs at the memory of my father seizing the hoover and thrusting it up and down the corridor carpet in an attempt to "learn" her how to use it properly! Also, after a certain age the kids will ridicule your efforts and rebel against the lessons.

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  • 5 months later...

If I Keep Wondering 'how Can People Afford Private School?'

Loads of things that make me wonder how people can afford them...

  • Olympics tickets
  • Football match tickets
  • Eating out
  • Running a car
  • Having children
  • Designer clothing
  • Nail bars
  • Weekends away
  • Playstation stuff
  • boob jobs

Of course this list is not comprehensive, and I realise I'm not representative. Over 10 years since I last had a permanent job, and although i've had successful contracting jobs since (often been extended), the gaps in between have gotten longer - this means that the average money earned has plummeted, and also makes it even harder to get work the next time, a vicious circle.

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If I Keep Wondering 'how Can People Afford Private School?'

Loads of things that make me wonder how people can afford them...

  • Olympics tickets

  • Football match tickets

  • Eating out

  • Running a car

  • Having children

  • Designer clothing

  • Nail bars

  • Weekends away

  • Playstation stuff

  • boob jobs

  • Olympics tickets - Easy, didn't get any

  • Football match tickets - Only go when they have reduced prices for kids

  • Eating out - Print off vouchers loads of 241 deals

  • Running a car - Don't, got rid of it; Hire when I need one

  • Having children - mmm, stuck with that expense

  • Designer clothing - don't buy it

  • Nail bars - cut my own

  • Weekends away - again, some cheap offers, which along with 241 vouchers to eat makes it not so bad

  • Playstation stuff - have a wii and all games are tumbling in price ahead of new wii

  • boob jobs - NOt sure the missus wants me to have one!

I'd add on Rock Festival tickets; £200+ to camp in a muddy field.

Fortunately I don't have to pay for private school. That would break the bank.

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People are totally deluded. £12,600 fees and in arrears by £8,000 and it's only the first year!!!

To pay £12,600 in fees you need to gross around £20K/annum. And her income is falling :o

Really hacks me off that these people are looking for sympathy. There are people is far worse predicaments.

They can send their kids to state schools.

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I hated it.lot of arrogance and a lot of the kids leave with an inflated sense of superiority.would I send mine?no way.yeah they may get some good results but you have to balance that with the life skills and friends they'll make in the real world with real people.

A lot of what you say makes perfect sense especially about the affordability - the fact you hated it I am sure will be balanced by as many who loved it so perhaps your personal experience.

But the above comment re 'balance' I never quite understand - surely if you come from a working class family where no one went to private school, the majority of the adults left school at 16 and whilst enjoying a good standard of living you don't mix in middle class or upper class circles, the balance is provided by exposing your children to that world? not by saying it's not for them?

It's not about results above a certain minimum it's about confidence, social contacts etc, and a dose of arrogance god help us the kids of today need that don't they?

Edited by Greg Bowman
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A writer, Jacqui has found it hard to find work as publishers have cut back and freelance rates have been slashed.

Not a particularly good writer then!!

Jacqui also has daughters, Lola, 16, JoJo, 14, as well as Ruby, 22, who no longer lives at home, used to manage with the help of Jacqui's partner, Steve, a property developer, with whom she shares a six-bedroom house.

2 Adults and 3 kids in a 6 bedroom house presumably in Chiswick or close to West London. Already behind with the mortgage!! Though it does appear that 'Steve' is trying to sell the house presumably to settle his own debts as he is a 'property developer'. :lol:

However, her financial, as well as personal, circumstances took a turn for the worse when her six-year relationship with Steve broke up several months ago.

She explains: 'I have a mortgage on a flat in Chiswick that I rent out to give me some extra income and security.

I imagine they split over her not wanting to sell the house and Steve insisting that they have too. Looks like she was in the amateur BTL game as well.

No sympathy, big wake up call coming I am afraid and to her and many thousands like her.

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Fees for local private school, day pupils only, Cardiff

Fees from September 2010 to July 2011

Nursery £1,994 per term (£5,982 per year) ; includes lunch

8am – 1pm - £27.00 a day (includes breakfast, a morning snack and lunch)

8am – 4pm - £34.00 a day (includes a breakfast, a morning/afternoon snack and lunch)

8am – 6pm - £45.00 (includes breakfast, a morning snack, lunch and tea)

Junior School £2,371 per term (£7,113 per year)

Senior School £3,210 per term (£9,630 per year)

Sixth Form College £3,273 per term (£9,818 per year)

That's not too be bad even for 6th form. Round my way, the high end public/private schools are about £6/7k per term (Charterhouse, Cranleigh, St Johns etc), though I will say the Royal Grammar in Guildford is actually very good value about £9k per year and is academically excellent.

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I imagine they split over her not wanting to sell the house and Steve insisting that they have too. Looks like she was in the amateur BTL game as well.

No sympathy, big wake up call coming I am afraid and to her and many thousands like her.

I imagine Steve got sick of paying for someone else's kids to go to private school and a huge house for them all. This doesn't seem to be a school fee story, it's one of a woman with 4 kids living beyond her means and using various men to pay for it. Just because she's middle class and a writer seems to imply we should be sympathetic - would be very different if she was a "benefits scrounger" with a regional accent.

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The entitlement culture teachers have is rubbing off elsewhere in society and its bad road to go down let alone have it rubbing off on todays kids!

Teachers are on strike next week, but even worse the bleeding hearts are now telling my son all about it in class.

I discussed it with him, and let him know there are lots of people who don't get sick pay or holiday pay, never mind a pension. Some just scraping by on whatever they can earn from week to week. Teachers have the opportunity to present their side of the story to the kids without any checks or balances. Fortunately. my son has us to do that, but many don't and just swallow the whole story.

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