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Impact Of Second Homes Owners On Communities

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On the Isle of Wight I reported that there are approximately 4,000 second homes here. Currently we are seeing numerous amenities, swimming pools, toilets, post offices, pubs etc being forced to shut due to lack of local money and lack of use.

Are the chicken coming home to roost regarding second home ownership? After years of pushing up prices, pushing local out and forcing locals to undertake huge mortgages caused by their 'luxury' living. The detrement effect is finally reaching a pinnacle in society.

Village schools are shutting due to decreasing demands due to the effects of second home ownership. Bus routes are closing off daily due to no locals using them.

All so Giles from London can look at some daisys and grass once in a while.

And recieve a discount for doing so.

Does anyone on here have examples of local 'negative' effects of second home ownership?

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BTL and second homes are a very small market that get a proportionally big bad press here.

Perhaps people should look at the real reason that UK property is too high - A corrupt Labour government and Bank of England that was obsessed with winning the public vote by too low interest rates for too long.

Simple.

Edited by ringledman

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A strong market for second homes in an area increases the value of all property -> increases the wealth of home-owning locals -> allows them to contribute more to the local economy -> these areas prosper

and vice versa (Merthyr Tydfill anyone?)

egg chicken

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A strong market for second homes in an area increases the value of all property -> increases the wealth of home-owning locals -> and vice versa (Merthyr Tydfill anyone?)

egg chicken

Not until they die, down-size, move up north or emigrate. Until a house is sold, the increased house 'value' is no more than a paper figure.

The disadvantages to locals far outweigh any advantages.

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BTL and second homes are a very small market that get a proportionally big bad press here.

Perhaps people should look at the real reason that UK property is too high - A corrupt Labour government and Bank of England that was obsessed with winning the public vote by too low interest rates for too long.

Simple.

Can we keep this to topic please.

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A strong market for second homes in an area increases the value of all property -> increases the wealth of home-owning locals -> allows them to contribute more to the local economy -> these areas prosper

and vice versa (Merthyr Tydfill anyone?)

egg chicken

Tell that to the locals in rural areas. If there are any locals left. Second home owners have destroyed the infrastructure of rural communities. Has someone who works within the remit of the old group 7 (Devon, Cornwall, Dorset, Wiltshire, Scilly Isles etc.) i can confirm first hand that you are talking out of your backside. The demise of local shops , schools, post offices, garages, public transport, libraries, public toilets and other amenities does not indicate prosperity to me. A shop keeper in Merthyr Tydfill wil keep going long after the small village shop in a village of unoccupied houses has gone bankrupt.

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Tell that to the locals in rural areas. If there are any locals left. Second home owners have destroyed the infrastructure of rural communities. Has someone who works within the remit of the old group 7 (Devon, Cornwall, Dorset, Wiltshire, Scilly Isles etc.) i can confirm first hand that you are talking out of your backside. The demise of local shops , schools, post offices, garages, public transport, libraries, public toilets and other amenities does not indicate prosperity to me. A shop keeper in Merthyr Tydfill wil keep going long after the small village shop in a village of unoccupied houses has gone bankrupt.

...agreed ...it's time to tax second homes out of existence ...let the communities prosper once again ...and chase the lice back to the cities where they belong....it's all about 'Choices' in life ....you can't have both you greedy monsters.. ... .....:rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

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Tell that to the locals in rural areas. If there are any locals left. Second home owners have destroyed the infrastructure of rural communities. Has someone who works within the remit of the old group 7 (Devon, Cornwall, Dorset, Wiltshire, Scilly Isles etc.) i can confirm first hand that you are talking out of your backside. The demise of local shops , schools, post offices, garages, public transport, libraries, public toilets and other amenities does not indicate prosperity to me. A shop keeper in Merthyr Tydfill wil keep going long after the small village shop in a village of unoccupied houses has gone bankrupt.

I am genuinely concerned about second homes. Not their owners, but their homes. To have a static and vunerable asset sitting in the middle of what is essensially bankrupt districts like trophies, to me is a risk I wouldn't want to run at this current time of for any time in the future. Not when there will the thousands of jobs lost in rural areas due to no real demand in their services.

A defining pinnacle moment to rural societies and second home ownership. For them I hope the penny doesn't drop with to much of a clang.

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You appear to be confusing causation with correlation.

The demise of local shops , schools, post offices, garages, public transport, libraries, public toilets and other amenities does not indicate prosperity to me.

This is all bad, but it happens in places where the proportion of second homes is very low indeed. The village near us is probably 100% owner occupier, full time resident...and yet the local stores have closed, post office has gone and the school is dying on its feet...because none of the full time residents use these facilities. The know where Tesco is, they have Ocado on speed dial, and they send their kids to the bigger and better school down the road. Nothing to do with empty homes.

Local shops are collapsing all over the place - you can't blame this on second home owners. Schools are consolidating, and I'd be interested to see facts on the proportion of second home owners and their ability to clobber the local school. Second home owners pay just as much in maintenance on their houses as everyone else, so the local trades will be fine. And I'm not entirely sure that the second home owner puts less into the local economy than some impoverished local: after all they come down for 4+ weeks of the year and spend like mad.

Second home owners are clearly guilty of pricing the locals out of the market...but what gives a local person the right to buy a house in the area they grew up in? I have no "right" to buy a house where I grew up - I have to pay for it, just like everyone else.

On the Isle of Wight I reported that there are approximately 4,000 second homes here.

The 2003 Census suggests that there are 57,000 households on the Isle of Wight. So second home owners represent about 7.5% of the households. Given their low percentage, they seem to be having an extraordinary effect.

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I am genuinely concerned about second homes. Not their owners, but their homes. To have a static and vunerable asset sitting in the middle of what is essensially bankrupt districts like trophies, to me is a risk I wouldn't want to run at this current time of for any time in the future. Not when there will the thousands of jobs lost in rural areas due to no real demand in their services.

A defining pinnacle moment to rural societies and second home ownership. For them I hope the penny doesn't drop with to much of a clang.

I agree. Many small employers have moved away from rural communities because there is no local labour living in the vicinity. even rural retained fire stations have closed down because there are no local workers to provide retained fire cover any more. It must be a worry to have a pretty thatched cottage tucked away in an idyillic rural setting miles away from the nearest fire station that you only check on a couple of times a year.

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You appear to be confusing causation with correlation.

This is all bad, but it happens in places where the proportion of second homes is very low indeed. The village near us is probably 100% owner occupier, full time resident...and yet the local stores have closed, post office has gone and the school is dying on its feet...because none of the full time residents use these facilities. The know where Tesco is, they have Ocado on speed dial, and they send their kids to the bigger and better school down the road. Nothing to do with empty homes.

Local shops are collapsing all over the place - you can't blame this on second home owners. Schools are consolidating, and I'd be interested to see facts on the proportion of second home owners and their ability to clobber the local school. Second home owners pay just as much in maintenance on their houses as everyone else, so the local trades will be fine. And I'm not entirely sure that the second home owner puts less into the local economy than some impoverished local: after all they come down for 4+ weeks of the year and spend like mad.

Second home owners are clearly guilty of pricing the locals out of the market...but what gives a local person the right to buy a house in the area they grew up in? I have no "right" to buy a house where I grew up - I have to pay for it, just like everyone else.

The 2003 Census suggests that there are 57,000 households on the Isle of Wight. So second home owners represent about 7.5% of the households. Given their low percentage, they seem to be having an extraordinary effect.

They have enough effect in high concentrated areas such as Bembridge and Seaview, effectively two towns lost due to 2nd homes. This has come about in what, the last 10 years or so? They are not spread over entire counties but congregate in trend areas.

2003 saw the beginning of the housing boom in huge terms, it would be fair to say that figure of 2nd homes ownership is significantly higher in 2009/10. Enough for the wheel of negative contributed effect to take hold.

Again 2nd home ownership has contributed to ailing societies, in no way does largely empty homes help a given area, how possibly can it?

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You appear to be confusing causation with correlation.

The 2003 Census suggests that there are 57,000 households on the Isle of Wight. So second home owners represent about 7.5% of the households. Given their low percentage, they seem to be having an extraordinary effect.

I can't believe that second homes affect the whole island, it is surely more localised than that. I lived on the IOW 40 years ago and there were a lot of second homes then, for example in winter Seaview was a ghost village, but Ryde was ok.

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The only experience I have of Bembridge is that my aunt used to live there. I would guess that the root cause of many of the problems you describe could be attributed to pensioners, not second home owners.

In terms of the local economy, they are neither good or bad. If I look at places like Spain, where the density of second homes is absolutely huge (50%+ in coastal areas), local villages are thriving with strong economies - to a far greater extent than 30 years ago, when there were very few second homes.

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I agree. Many small employers have moved away from rural communities because there is no local labour living in the vicinity. even rural retained fire stations have closed down because there are no local workers to provide retained fire cover any more. It must be a worry to have a pretty thatched cottage tucked away in an idyillic rural setting miles away from the nearest fire station that you only check on a couple of times a year.

It only takes a seemingly small amount to make a big impact. Much like anything, such as the car industry, and the highstreet where drops of 4% can effectively close companies, the profit magins are tight and not vast as some people seem to think they are.

Some rural areas have at least 7.5% holiday homes ranging up to 15% in high concentrate areas. More than enough to bankrupt small local businesses and ruin amenities.

The general concensus it seems from a select few here, is that a small local business can thrive with effectively 7.5% less consistantly active population (I suggest double that figure as 2nd home owners usually have wives and children) at the very least and still survive., which is frankly a ridiculous claim.

The chickens have come firmly home to roost. :(

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Again 2nd home ownership has contributed to ailing societies, in no way does largely empty homes help a given area, how possibly can it?

...it is unlikely housing would be empty nowadays ....more so with the introduction of broadband and now with the roll out of super broadband.....give the country back to people who live there or wish to live there as members of the community ....not the property owning odd weekenders ....for them it's a hobby or fun pursuit...let them go to Disney instead.... :rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

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If you spend 90% of your income in London and only 10% in Cornwall it has a huge impact. The government needs to make owning second property very expensive. It would be reasonable to charge much higher council tax (2x or 3x). Unfortunately there are ways around everything so enforcement would be difficult.

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BTL and second homes are a very small market that get a proportionally big bad press here.

Perhaps people should look at the real reason that UK property is too high - A corrupt Labour government and Bank of England that was obsessed with winning the public vote by too low interest rates for too long.

Simple.

They might make up a small realatively small number of owners over all, but they make up a large number of buyers as there numbers are only increasing and holiday homes tend to be located in small pockets causing price 'hot spots'

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Why does the IoW council insist on building so many new homes designated as 'holiday homes' (planning permission preventing year round occupancy)?

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The general concensus it seems from a select few here, is that a small local business can thrive with effectively 7.5% less consistantly active population (I suggest double that figure as 2nd home owners usually have wives and children) at the very least and still survive., which is frankly a ridiculous claim.

You appear determined to come to a conclusion that is not based on evidence. Some points.

A house could be occupied by some "son of the land" on a low wage on a permanent basis...or a banker on a 4 - 6 week basis. I would suggest that the banker will spend more in 4 - 6 weeks than the impoverished local will spend in a year on discretionary items. So the effect on the local economy is probably neutral. Food doesn't count because everyone shops at Tesco - in fact I would think that the second home mob would be more keen to shop locally than the real locals.

All of the utilities and trades are pretty much identical - in fact there is a considerable new market in maintaining and managing these homes.

You are railing against closure of amenities - which happens everywhere, regardless of the level of second home ownership.

IoW (and many coastal areas) are magnets for pensioners - who will do exactly the same damage to the local schools and amenities as your second home owners. Back to the census: IoW is third on the list for retired households,with 17,000 on the island, over 4x as many as second home owners. This will be having a much greater impact on your schools and amenities. Why don't you campaign against them?

In European areas with very large numbers of second homes, this economic decline is not happening. How can this be?

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The evidence is happening now. Please re-read the intitial post about 2nd homes contributing to the demise of societies.

Pensioners pay into local businesses.

Empty 2nd homes don't.

A simple enough concept really. :blink:

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4000 out of how many houses?

Schools get closed.

I'd imagine a general reduction in families in the area is bad for the ones who stay. Birthday parties are probably very quiet in some of these holiday home villages.

Fleet (I think it was) was on our NW Tonight news becuase their school has 7 kids left in it because it's in a tourist area in the peak district.

Whilst tourism brings in money it doesn't affect most local people.

jobs will be seasonal and/or partime. Cottage cleaning is only a couple of days a week due to handovers being on a saturday/friday

jobs will be low wage. Most holiday areas now employ foreign workers who'll live in drafty crappy caravans all summer.

Social services staff won't live in the area. Homehelps will come from miles away and be delayed/not come in bad weather/snow.

Shops will be cr&p in winter. Some may even close.

There may not be a doctors for miles as local surgeries would have closed due to lack of patients.

Demand on services like hospitals etc is up during the tourist season though.

Sewer systems and water supplies are put under pressure when populatons swell in summer months too.

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