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Customs Officers Ordered Not To Look For Drug Smugglers At Heathrow Over Christmas

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http://www.infiniteunknown.net/2011/01/07/customs-officers-ordered-not-to-look-for-drug-smugglers-at-heathrow-over-christmas/

Customs officers were ordered not to look for drug smugglers at Heathrow over Christmas because of staff shortages.

An extraordinary email was sent to all staff at the UK’s busiest airport on December 23, telling them not to ‘actively seek to identify any passenger with internal concealments’.

The UK border – through which 100,000 people enter every day – was left open for three days thanks to the command, allowing possibly ‘scores’ of drug mules to get in.

Smugglers with hauls of cocaine, heroin and cannabis in their stomachs would have been waved through the airport, which handles 70million passengers a year.

Mark Kennedy, the UK Border Agency’s senior detection manager, blamed staff shortages for the order, which he said should be in force for 72 hours up to and including Christmas Day.

The email, leaked by a whistleblower, also warned officers that if they did arrest smugglers, they would have to work a 24-hour shift guarding prisoners.

More a the link ...

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And this is relevant to the economy/house prices how? Anyway, to me it's not a big deal....the drug war cannot be won and fighting it is a huge waste of time and money.

It is relevant. It shows the beginning of a breakdown of essential public services (it would be hard to get any lower than this) due to restrictions on public expenditure. It is worth noting that the capping of UK Borders costs undoubtedly comes because of supports to the housing market and banking industry.

To put more succinctly: there is no fat on the bone that can be cut at current levels of public sector wages. We are on our way to national bustdom. Taxes or IRs will have to go up.

It's not just about twigs :)

Edited by _w_

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It is relevant. It shows the beginning of a breakdown of essential public services (it would be hard to get any lower than this) due to restrictions on public expenditure. It is worth noting that the capping of UK Borders costs undoubtedly comes because of supports to the housing market and banking industry.

To put more succinctly: there is no fat on the bone that can be cut at current levels of public sector wages. We are on our way to national bustdom. Taxes or IRs will have to go up.

It's not just about twigs :)

OK, brain fart from me :rolleyes: - didn't really register the emphasis on staff shortages in your excerpt (despite the fact that you highlighted it!). Still, if budget caps force authorities to prioritise duties away from drug sniffing and towards enforcement of immigration laws then I'm not too worked up.

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It is relevant. It shows the beginning of a breakdown of essential public services (it would be hard to get any lower than this) due to restrictions on public expenditure. It is worth noting that the capping of UK Borders costs undoubtedly comes because of supports to the housing market and banking industry.

To put more succinctly: there is no fat on the bone that can be cut at current levels of public sector wages. We are on our way to national bustdom. Taxes or IRs will have to go up.

It's not just about twigs :)

To me it shows that jobs in the public services have already been cut to the bone on the front line and the lower paid end of the public sector , while those at the top have been creaming it all off.

They had the riot at Ford open prison on new years eve . There were just 2 prison officers and 4 support staff to look after 500 inmates MADDNESS. No wonder there is so much unemployment when essential jobs like these do not have the staff .

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These kind of "light touch" orders takes me back to the grey days of the previous Tory government, when I was on passport control at Heathrow.

Towards the end the government was underfunding us so much that to cut costs they scrapped the embarkation control entirely (leaving us with no clue as to who was departing - therefore in one swoop rendering our overstayer checks and terrorist monitoring systems useless). Then there were the short staff times when we were ordered to look at (yes LOOK AT) just 1 EU passport in 10 on the EU control.

Naturally if we were waving through 9 little grey haired old ladies who were clutching UK passports, then 1 young rastaman appeared with a crack crazed look in his eye and sweating nervously, we would stop him - causing secondary complaints of racial profiling (which we did but were not allowed to admit - how else could we operate under such a regime?).

The same system was brought in with the customs vehicle controls down at the ferries etc on the south coast, causing an overnight boom in drugs and gun imports which survives until this day. Those of you watching old British films such as Ealing comedies etc would see the gangster vehicle coming off the ferry and the customs officer asking every single driver "anything to declare?". Forget about it now.

I hope light touch does not return to heathrow passport control but with skeletal staff levels and 3,000 passengers in the arrivals hall in a busy morning, who knows.

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These kind of "light touch" orders takes me back to the grey days of the previous Tory government, when I was on passport control at Heathrow.

Towards the end the government was underfunding us so much that to cut costs they scrapped the embarkation control entirely (leaving us with no clue as to who was departing - therefore in one swoop rendering our overstayer checks and terrorist monitoring systems useless). Then there were the short staff times when we were ordered to look at (yes LOOK AT) just 1 EU passport in 10 on the EU control.

Naturally if we were waving through 9 little grey haired old ladies who were clutching UK passports, then 1 young rastaman appeared with a crack crazed look in his eye and sweating nervously, we would stop him - causing secondary complaints of racial profiling (which we did but were not allowed to admit - how else could we operate under such a regime?).

The same system was brought in with the customs vehicle controls down at the ferries etc on the south coast, causing an overnight boom in drugs and gun imports which survives until this day. Those of you watching old British films such as Ealing comedies etc would see the gangster vehicle coming off the ferry and the customs officer asking every single driver "anything to declare?". Forget about it now.

I hope light touch does not return to heathrow passport control but with skeletal staff levels and 3,000 passengers in the arrivals hall in a busy morning, who knows.

A treat indeed to read such a lucid post CB, I think that you ought to consider writing a book about your experiences..

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What's the point of fighting drugs. Some drugs will always get through, and any drugs seized will just put the price up of the rest of it. The policing costs, legal costs of convictions and prison costs are enormous, not to mention the crime that the users resort to to pay for their habits. The only way to beat drug crime is to give the drugs away for free, or better yet, legalise it and tax it. This would save the country billions.

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These kind of "light touch" orders takes me back to the grey days of the previous Tory government, when I was on passport control at Heathrow.

Towards the end the government was underfunding us so much that to cut costs they scrapped the embarkation control entirely (leaving us with no clue as to who was departing - therefore in one swoop rendering our overstayer checks and terrorist monitoring systems useless). Then there were the short staff times when we were ordered to look at (yes LOOK AT) just 1 EU passport in 10 on the EU control.

Naturally if we were waving through 9 little grey haired old ladies who were clutching UK passports, then 1 young rastaman appeared with a crack crazed look in his eye and sweating nervously, we would stop him - causing secondary complaints of racial profiling (which we did but were not allowed to admit - how else could we operate under such a regime?).

The same system was brought in with the customs vehicle controls down at the ferries etc on the south coast, causing an overnight boom in drugs and gun imports which survives until this day. Those of you watching old British films such as Ealing comedies etc would see the gangster vehicle coming off the ferry and the customs officer asking every single driver "anything to declare?". Forget about it now.

I hope light touch does not return to heathrow passport control but with skeletal staff levels and 3,000 passengers in the arrivals hall in a busy morning, who knows.

Got pulled over at Dover leaving the country, post 9-11. The customs (I presume) officer was grinning sheepishly. He had a list of items he was supposed to be checking us for, in case we sank the ferry, or summat like that.

"Got any knives?" he started, looking at the mound of camping gear in the back of the car.

"Yeah, thanks", I said, "and liquid gas, petrol, meths and matches as well".

Most of it is theatre. How much really gets stopped by customs officers, apart from the small "personal" consumption items?

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Reality check.

Even without the email the staff knew that they were undermanned. How many do you think are going to be actively searching out a problem so that they can stay on to cover detainees during the christmas period?

Without emails the police frequently let people off or look away when it is getting close to the end of their shifts, just like many other workers will not start a large job close to finishing time.

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Special orders from banksters - their christmas treats had to be allowed through.

Artcile today about Banksters and drugs in the Telegraph

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8245892/Drugs-readily-available-at-JP-Morgan.html

This quote from article made me laugh "A spokesman for JP Morgan said: “Any suggestion that Miss McMillan obtained drugs from a contact within JP Morgan is unfounded.” :lol:

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A treat indeed to read such a lucid post CB, I think that you ought to consider writing a book about your experiences..

There's already a such a book out there, "Refusal Shoes" by Tony Saint. Claims to be fictional.

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There's already a such a book out there, "Refusal Shoes" by Tony Saint. Claims to be fictional.

I've got that book, Tony was of my vintage and worked at Terminal 3. The characters he described were all as eccentric as the real life characters of the pre-politicall correct immigration service, based on real persons with name changes. We genuinely used to be trained (by our mentors, not in writing) to pick out "duffers" from the queue with bizarre "refusal shoes" - which did not match the ill-fitting suit that they had clearly bought for the sole purpose of convincing the immigration officer that they were professional people and therefore genuine tourists, not toothless illiterate farm labourers from some peasant village.

Those were the days - I recall fellow officers smoking on the control in the early 90's, with ashtrays under the desk. On my training I was mentored by an alchy who used to rush me up to the bar between flights, and promised me a good report if I bought him enough pints. I spent most of my 6 weeks training drunk, but got a great report. All the drunks would spend a fortune on Polo mints etc.

Before I left heathrow for central London enforcement duties, the bosses finally brought in a smoking room and banned drinking between flights - but not on night-shifts, where it was common place to have lots, and lots of parties, booze, food, sha**ng and sleeping. Thanks tax-payers! I could ramble on for hours but would end up being thrown off this forum by disgusted upstanding citizens annoyed at the waste and bad behaviour.

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Artcile today about Banksters and drugs in the Telegraph

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8245892/Drugs-readily-available-at-JP-Morgan.html

This quote from article made me laugh "A spokesman for JP Morgan said: “Any suggestion that Miss McMillan obtained drugs from a contact within JP Morgan is unfounded.” :lol:

Read it and weep. Drugs are routinely available in large city firms or firms that serve the city in the city. I remember being offered hashish by a colleague on my first day working in a large telecommunications company whose main clients were city firms. The rabbit hole goes so deep it makes your head spin.

The idea that they stopped checking for drugs "because they were understaffed" is laughable when you consider how the lack of de-icing equipment and snow ploughs caused the major airports to be shut down this winter.

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Read it and weep. Drugs are routinely available in large city firms or firms that serve the city in the city. I remember being offered hashish by a colleague on my first day working in a large telecommunications company whose main clients were city firms. The rabbit hole goes so deep it makes your head spin.

Yes, these people really like to stick the marching powder up their noses!

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It is relevant. It shows the beginning of a breakdown of essential public services (it would be hard to get any lower than this) due to restrictions on public expenditure. It is worth noting that the capping of UK Borders costs undoubtedly comes because of supports to the housing market and banking industry.

To put more succinctly: there is no fat on the bone that can be cut at current levels of public sector wages. We are on our way to national bustdom. Taxes or IRs will have to go up.

It's not just about twigs :)

Forget about suing anyone - HMCS simply do not enforce court orders anymore

Anecdote - A friend of mine who is polish has all but given up trying to get the HMCS to enforce maintenance orders against her Ex. As they don't seem to be prepared to collect £427 pcm from her Ex.s payroll or collect the arrears she owes her she is coming back to the UK to sign up for every benefit she can get for her and her 5 year old disabled son.

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The War on Drugs was as ill conceived as the War on Terror and is just Prohibition 2.0, an unwinnable war against large sections of the global populace, formenting crime syndicates by rendering certain products illegal and unregulated.

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The War on Drugs was as ill conceived as the War on Terror and is just Prohibition 2.0, an unwinnable war against large sections of the global populace, formenting crime syndicates by rendering certain products illegal and unregulated.

Yes it is, but it sells "news"! :huh:

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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