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Nearly Half Of Women Wouldn't Bother With University If They Had The Chance Again

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1344857/Nearly-half-women-wouldnt-bother-university-chance-again.html

'Young women are losing faith in the university system with nearly half believing it is not worth getting a degree.

Tuition fees and little chance of landing a good job make higher education an unattractive prospect for them, a study suggests.

Finally,someone prepared to tell the kids how it is.Genuinely,I feel very sorry for people under 35,loaded up with debts to pay for the ponzi in housing,education and govt jobs.All this feminist spiel about having it all was just bull.Women have ended up working harder than ever,forsaking families just to pay papa ponzi his dues.

I'm glad they're not gonna go to uni and land themselves in serious debt for a qualification that is virtually meaningless in most cases.Why should they spend a lifetime as a debt slave just so some lecturer can have a cushy retirement having taught generations of economics students the wrong solutions to the wrong problems.

The educonomy is running out of suckers.

The idea of a highly educated workforce is fine. The idea of trying to get there by making everyone do an academic degree isn't.

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Anybody who has done an arts degree in the last 20 years or so knows how worthless they are.

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Women expect too much - who knew! :P

Edit: If there are any women clever enough to sign on and read this post that was meant in jest and entirely derived from my limited sample size of former spouses.

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women should know their place...slippers and pipe and homemade cherry pie, ready for the homeward return of the breadwinner....probably a woman too.

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'Bout time someone was saying this. The pedlars of mass higher education would have you believe it's the only investment where the law of diminishing returns doesn't apply. More input - graduates, less output - productivity, workforce flexibility and wage deflation. I suspect the future of tertiary education will look more like MCSE and Cisco CCNA than John Major's muppet universities, where students pay for industry and task specific qualifications rather than generalised 'thinking' skills. But it'll take employers to wake up to that cup of java as well before it happens.

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My gf's daughter has a degree and around £15,000 of student debt and she has had two jobs, a sales assistant in Waterstones and a hotel receptionist. I doubt she would say her time at Uni was worthwhile.

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The provision of university could be so much cheaper if students were prepared to watch lectures online instead of moving to a different city and physically attending lectures. They could even watch lectures recorded from previous years. Open University style.

Also, in the current system, the pretense of lecturers spending most of their time lecturing allows them to actually devote most of their time to research. Result: tuition fees are going to subsidise research.

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The provision of university could be so much cheaper if students were prepared to watch lectures online instead of moving to a different city and physically attending lectures. They could even watch lectures recorded from previous years. Open University style.

Also, in the current system, the pretense of lecturers spending most of their time lecturing allows them to actually devote most of their time to research. Result: tuition fees are going to subsidise research.

These days, most UK Unis run distance learning programmes.

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women should know their place...slippers and pipe and homemade cherry pie, ready for the homeward return of the breadwinner....probably a woman too.

I understand lots of men are very proficient at changing nappies. :P

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Anybody who has done an arts degree in the last 20 years or so knows how worthless they are.

Yes we desperately need more technical minded people in this country.

Loads of my friends that did International Politics at university graduated, and are expected to do at least a year and a half of unpaid work (usually an internship working for a local mp, flouting the minimum wage laws that they voted for), or get a masters. Once they've got one of these they'll be happy with a job starting on £15k. :huh:

On the other hand, my current employers offer Computer Science graduates that have done a year long placement as part of their course £20k as a starting wage, and we can't fill the positions because there aren't enough decent Computer Science graduates out there.

If anyone else is interested in reading about illegal internships and some of the shocking yet funny treatment these guys go through, you should check out Interns Anonymous:

http://internsanonymous.co.uk/

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I loved my time at University, I dread to think how I'd turned out if I'd stayed in my home town, probably a 30 something virgin living with my parents (sorry if that offends 90% of other HPI posters :lol: )

However from an economic standpoint I'm not sure it would justify £9000 a year, £3000 just about but not £9000.

My worry is for our science degrees.

My wife's work is well over 60% foreign staffed, and it is a publically funded institute. In order to get a job you need a first degree and ideally a PhD. You'll earn about £30k a year for working there. Foreign workers come in at the age of 30 with their degrees but little debt. British workers would effectively pay an extra 9% on their income tax than their overseas colleagues for the next 30 years of their careers.

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What about young men.....no difference data. :P

Corrected for you.

I expect you're probably right: there's no reason to suppose the sexes should be substantially different in this regard. But in the absence of data you can't really say. The subject of any study has to be a group someone has a budget for: that could include "students" or "women students" or "women", but not "men" or "men students".

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I think the fundamental point here is that the reckless expansion of HE started by the Major govt when all the polys got converted, and continued by the Blair administration, has failed.

Yes we need more and better educated people but we aren't going to get it on the cheap, and these reforms were 'market driven' in the sense that students - who know ****** all about the world at 18 and 19 - got to drive the market by choosing popular vs 'hard' subjects. They weren't driven by the labour market which has zero input these days into how many do what kind of courses.

My original career was in journalism, a decidedly finite number of jobs came up every year and in the old days newspapers would hire promising candidates (in the 80s, still mainly school leavers not grads - and mainly through nepotism so nothing really changes), train them through the National Council for the Training of journalists' training schemes (3 centres - edinburgh newcastle and cardiff), turning out maybe 60 new hacks a year in total which was about the right level for the number of jobs coming up in that pre-internet, pre 24-hour news era. This was two lots of eight week block release, training you to write shorthand, how to structure a story, what the legal pitfalls were, how the various layers of government worked, and how media companies worked in practice.

Nowadays we don't train 60 journalists a year any more, we 'educate' 50 or 100 times as many media graduates who spent five times longer pissing around, amass big debts, and still leave without the essential practical skills needed by a proper journo.

Repeat for every profession - it, electronics, accountancy, local government, business - and we have a generation of wrongly qualified, indebted people with skewed expectations of their place in the world. To get a trainee hack job now you need a degree at least, most likely a masters - but the prospects for long term earnings aren't any better than they were for the school leavers 30 years ago. (The salaries in general for senior journalists are lower now in actual pound notes than they were when I left the profession in the early 90s). Repeat for retail, hospitality etc etc

When I went to uni it was 5% of the population (and yes this is too low for today's world). Now it's 40%. Not a waste of time going for the top 20% maybe but a total waste for those who struggle to get in in the first place.

I'm not surprised women are opting out of this - there's always been a hard core of women happy with low status work waiting on a guy (who may or may not actually arrive) to bring in the proper goodies. The high fliers won't be put off but for this lot, you can totally see the point.

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problem is that kids are 18 when they agree to take the debts on,and that's jsut too young to understand how long they're going to take to clear.

Yesterdays debt will be different to tomorrows debt...debt will be a badge of merit, proof that someone was prepared to take a risk to improve their future life chances..... everyone will be at it.....the bright with debt will have nothing to lose as long as they make the right where and what choices. ;)

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I loved my time at University, I dread to think how I'd turned out if I'd stayed in my home town, probably a 30 something virgin living with my parents (sorry if that offends 90% of other HPI posters :lol: )

You just admitted that you went to university a virgin

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If I could choose again it would either be three things:

1. Not study politics (ffs), but rather study law or something more vocational/techy (which I like but not mathy)

2. Not study at all and start working. Problem was, when you're 16-18 you know feck all about anything, and unless your parents went to uni - chances are you will make an ill informed choice (like studying politics). Then again, in 2000 right after the tech bubble, there were no jobs in Sweden.

3. Go for a graduate intern job at a large company and come in at a higher level instead of working up from the bottom. I had no idea there was graduate jobs before I started working in the UK.

The job I am in, large blue chip multinational, recruits from within anyway, and I definitely don't need a degree to DO my job but it sure helps in certain aspects (critical thinking mainly and writing text) but that's the sort of stuff you would pick up from working for 4 years as opposed to studying for 4 years anyway. Zero sum game really.

I've got 16K student debt from the Swedish system, to be repaid over 25 years. Started at 20k+ debt.

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You just admitted that you went to university a virgin

She might still be , just not living with her parents.

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My gf's daughter has a degree and around £15,000 of student debt and she has had two jobs, a sales assistant in Waterstones and a hotel receptionist. I doubt she would say her time at Uni was worthwhile.

If thats all that awaited me in the world of work I'd be pissing about at uni for a few years instead as well. Time well spent!

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If thats all that awaited me in the world of work I'd be pissing about at uni for a few years instead as well. Time well spent!

Exactly....that is what many are doing today, when they leave have no better job prospects than someone who had left school and had clocked up three years work experience and pay rises.

Maybe they should start their own business. :P

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Corrected for you.

I expect you're probably right: there's no reason to suppose the sexes should be substantially different in this regard. But in the absence of data you can't really say.

I went to a uni that was focussed on engineering / maths type courses. 95% male students. There was another uni nearby which was more meeja/applied needlework/fluffy bunny type degrees. Majority were wimmin.

So no surprise, women make poor career choices and end up unemployed or on poor pay with a millstone of debt to off load onto some poor unwitting husband. The main exceptions seem to be law and medical degrees and of course educashun.

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The provision of university could be so much cheaper if students were prepared to watch lectures online instead of moving to a different city and physically attending lectures. They could even watch lectures recorded from previous years. Open University style.

Also, in the current system, the pretense of lecturers spending most of their time lecturing allows them to actually devote most of their time to research. Result: tuition fees are going to subsidise research.

I did my degree in my home City for this very reason, wasn't prepared to pay the high costs of rent etc...

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If thats all that awaited me in the world of work I'd be pissing about at uni for a few years instead as well. Time well spent!

I tend to think that borrowing money to fund three or so years of your own unemployment is not a good idea. There was a time when you could leave school at 16 with a few O levels and obtain minimum wage jobs.

No wonder kids are pissed off.

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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