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TheBlueCat

Should I Stay Or Should I Go Back?

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I've been working here in Toronto for most of this year on a temporary company transfer. They've been pressing me to commit to staying here permanently and I've been trying to decide what to do over the break.

On the plus side for Canada:

- I get to live in a nice house in a great area close to work (something I couldn't ever do in London)

- work is nice, good firm, very good money

- the people are nice, very open, laid back, like to enjoy their lives outside of work, low chav count

- the economy is in reasonable shape

- fantastic outdoor stuff

- no nu-labour waiting in the wings polishing their jack-boots

On the plus side for the UK:

- family, friends, it's home

- much better music and arts scene in general

- pubs, waitrose, majestic wine warehouse (booze in Canada is mainly sold through provincial government controlled monopolies)

- closeness to Europe for holidays etc

What would you do?

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If you have the chance for a fixed-extension of say one or two years I would go for it.

Canada has a lot to offer as you say, and in my experience it is in the second/third year of foreign placements that you really start to feel part of your new community. It would make sense to stay a year or two longer, then I guess you can be sure whether it is right to stay or right to come back. And a year is only a year after all... only one-two percent of your lifetime.

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I've been working here in Toronto for most of this year on a temporary company transfer. They've been pressing me to commit to staying here permanently and I've been trying to decide what to do over the break.

On the plus side for Canada:

- I get to live in a nice house in a great area close to work (something I couldn't ever do in London)

- work is nice, good firm, very good money

- the people are nice, very open, laid back, like to enjoy their lives outside of work, low chav count

- the economy is in reasonable shape

- fantastic outdoor stuff

- no nu-labour waiting in the wings polishing their jack-boots

On the plus side for the UK:

- family, friends, it's home

- much better music and arts scene in general

- pubs, waitrose, majestic wine warehouse (booze in Canada is mainly sold through provincial government controlled monopolies)

- closeness to Europe for holidays etc

What would you do?

Stay in Canada, at least for another year or two if you can. Is it possible to apply for dual citizenship if you are there long enough? A second citizenship is always useful and allows options in the future. You'll get over the homesickness after a while, especially as your life settles there and you discover alternatives to the things you are missing. You can always visit your friends and family and video skype helps you keep in touch.

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On the plus side for the UK:

- family, friends, it's home

This is the only serious contender in your list, but if you are not with a partner, make a family in Canada ;)

- much better music and arts scene in general

CD's, DVD's, start a music scene

- pubs, waitrose, majestic wine warehouse (booze in Canada is mainly sold through provincial government controlled monopolies)

this is not that 'important'

- closeness to Europe for holidays etc

Why would you want to holiday in Europe when you have the vastness of Canada and the Americas (incl Alaska and its Denali) to explore, the Alutians on your doorstep, Hawaii, Greenland etc

What would you do?

I would stay, you can always come back but might not get the opportunity to work there again, and sit out the UK's financial collapse

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Stay in Canada, at least for another year or two if you can. Is it possible to apply for dual citizenship if you are there long enough? A second citizenship is always useful and allows options in the future. You'll get over the homesickness after a while, especially as your life settles there and you discover alternatives to the things you are missing. You can always visit your friends and family and video skype helps you keep in touch.

Yup - stay and apply for either a permanent visa or dual citizenship. At least that way you'll have choices in the future when UK PLC goes fubar.

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This is the only serious contender in your list, but if you are not with a partner, make a family in Canada ;)

I agree. Canada could well be one of the big winners in the 21st Century. Could be a good place to raise a family and put down roots. The UK could be facing financial and societal collapse over the next few decades. The best is almost certainly behind us.

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Notice how everybody says WHEN not IF but when the collaspe comes.

A side note is that Canada apparently still hasn't had its crash yet even though the same bubbleconomics are still at play in Canada. There was a segment on the Kaiser report which backed this up about 2 weeks ago.

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I would aim to give it another 2 years in Canada - UK is going to be dire for the next 2 years at least IMPO.

Who from your family is still alive? Your Mum and Dad? You have no idea how important parents are until they are gone. This would be my major concern.

Best of luck.

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- family, friends, it's home

What would you do?

Family is your only real issue here. I face a similar situation, and the only hesitation I have is leaving my parents. This is a little ironic because I was never really that close to them. But I guess when it comes to the crunch, we find out what's really important to us. I'm leaving because it's something I have to do for myself. But it's a decision taken with much reflection. Modern communications make it easier of course i.e. skype video etc.

You don't have to worry about leaving "home" as you call it, because you simply stay long enough to get a dual passport. Then you have total freedom to do as you please. But if you leave Canada now the door closes possibly forever. Why throw away such an opportunity? And what's does the UK really have to offer you anyway?

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Thanks for all the replies - it's interesting to read other people's points of view on this one. I think I'm coming down on the side of staying for at least the four years it'll take to get a Canadian passport (3 years legal residence plus around 1 year to apply). To answer a couple of points above:

- the Canadians I know generally have a very UK compatible sense of humour (much more so than the yanks I know)

- the music scene (classical, rock, jazz) really is weak compared to London or New York (where I've also lived). I don't think this is a clinching issue as I can always fly down to NYC for the big stuff but it's kind of irritating.

The only close relatives I have in the UK are my parents but I don't really like them that much so that's not such an issue for me. It's more of a problem for my wife but she seems to be prepared to deal with it.

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Thanks for all the replies - it's interesting to read other people's points of view on this one. I think I'm coming down on the side of staying for at least the four years it'll take to get a Canadian passport (3 years legal residence plus around 1 year to apply). To answer a couple of points above:

- the Canadians I know generally have a very UK compatible sense of humour (much more so than the yanks I know)

- the music scene (classical, rock, jazz) really is weak compared to London or New York (where I've also lived). I don't think this is a clinching issue as I can always fly down to NYC for the big stuff but it's kind of irritating.

The only close relatives I have in the UK are my parents but I don't really like them that much so that's not such an issue for me. It's more of a problem for my wife but she seems to be prepared to deal with it.

100% agree - stay get a canadian passport - best investment you could make ;)

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A side note is that Canada apparently still hasn't had its crash yet even though the same bubbleconomics are still at play in Canada.

Somewhat. The Canadian economy is being propped up by high commodity prices, and Vancouver's housing market (which seemed to be the worst in the country last I looked) is propped up by rich Asian immigrants and Canadian retirees... when you consider it's one of the few places which doesn't get to -20 or below for much of the winter there's a strong argument for people to sell up their house elsewhere and move to an apartment there when they retire.

If commodities crash then I suspect we will too, but so long as prices stay high the Canadian economy should do OK. And you can still buy a house for a few thousand dollars if you don't mind living in a tiny town in the middle of nowhere.

Certainly I have no intention of returning to the UK and I'm about to send off my citizenship application.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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