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Live Peasant

Where Is Stolen Stuff Fenced?

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Had a couple of laptops nicked from my car - virtually brand new Thinkpad t510s with i7 processors, 8gb ram and solid state hdds so they stand out like a sore thumb.

I'm keeping an eye on ebay, gumtree, cash converters and the local pc repair shops etc.

Both laptops were connected to windows domains and so were password protected.

They went on the night of 22nd/23rd so my bet is that whoever had them probably hasn't shifted them yet. They'd need to be reinstalled to get round the passwords/domain unless the thieving scum know what they are doing.

Where else should/could/might I be looking?

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Had a couple of laptops nicked from my car - virtually brand new Thinkpad t510s with i7 processors, 8gb ram and solid state hdds so they stand out like a sore thumb.

I'm keeping an eye on ebay, gumtree, cash converters and the local pc repair shops etc.

Both laptops were connected to windows domains and so were password protected.

They went on the night of 22nd/23rd so my bet is that whoever had them probably hasn't shifted them yet. They'd need to be reinstalled to get round the passwords/domain unless the thieving scum know what they are doing.

Where else should/could/might I be looking?

Depends upon why they were nicked, if it was for drug money, most likely IMO from a 'car theft', then they could be sold for a tenner a piece on the street; their true value in this case is meaningless. It might then be a while before they appear anywhere for real sale when you may have given up looking.

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You sure it was not a pro job? When I worked for a major tech company laptops would be regularly stolen from cars which stopped for petrol in a station near the UK HQ. The company were convinced that it was competitors re industrial spying and even ended up posting their own security in the petrol station.

To answer your question - best way to get the info you seek is to ask the local boys in blue.

Could you put an ad on gumtree sayng 'laptops wanted' and state your area? Obviously enormous personal risks involved here but you appear keen to get them back. Just be very careful whatever you decide to do.

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You have reported them nicked? Good secondhand shops subscribe to a service that checks serial numbers.

Second hand via local man who knows a man is the usual route.

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Had a couple of laptops nicked from my car - virtually brand new Thinkpad t510s

Sorry to hear about it LP.. one of the worst feelings to get your stuff nicked whether it's valuable or not.

I would agree that ebay is your best bet.. As long as you could actually prove they are yours.

Failing that I'm afraid you'll probably end up notching it down to experience. :(

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You have reported them nicked? Good secondhand shops subscribe to a service that checks serial numbers.

Second hand via local man who knows a man is the usual route.

Yeah, reported them stolen. The police were actually pretty good. Said it gave them an excuse to visit the usual suspects.

I think this was opportunist. Just bloody annoying and inconvenient.

I'd like to find 'the man who knows the man'.

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One hopes you did put them out of sight, didn't you?

I have learned from my own experience that a sealed boot is the only safe place for stuff.

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I have learned from my own experience that a sealed boot is the only safe place for stuff.

+1

Anything on view can be nicked.

GF had the side door screwdrivered just for a spark plug and windscreen wiper that were in the passenger footwell. About 8 cars that had anything on view in the NT car park were 'done' that afternoon. We noticed that the cars with nothing on view were intact.

I once had the side window smashed for a riding hat on the back seat, leaving all the camera gear in the boot untouched.

I am pretty sure most of it is 'opportunistic' and sold quickly on the street to buy drugs.

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The car was on a courtyard area well away from the main road, it was deliberate in the sense you can't just 'trip over it'.

I think whoever it was came looking for the contents of a new 'white van' that was parked up, didn't have any joy there but then saw my car on the other side of the courtyard. Everything was in the boot. They left my toolbox as it was too heavy. Two laptops, jacket and satnav.

The pain in the **** is getting all of the licences for the software sorted out.

Should make it clear, car is an estate.

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You sure it was not a pro job? When I worked for a major tech company laptops would be regularly stolen from cars which stopped for petrol in a station near the UK HQ. The company were convinced that it was competitors re industrial spying and even ended up posting their own security in the petrol station.

To answer your question - best way to get the info you seek is to ask the local boys in blue.

......

Company I used to work for had one of their guys jumped by two thugs as he carried his laptop from his car to the cafe in some services on the M1. They literally beat him senseless to get their hands on the machine. I guess that business laptops tend to be high end and worth at least several hundred quid. I don;t know if they nicked his wallet etc, to. Sites like http://www.bigpockets.co.uk sell reconditioned laptops, so you can gauge their 2nd hand value there.

Re fencing stolen goods: Within view of the infamous hyde park flats in Sheffield there's a pub with a hand scrawled sign in the window saying that anyone selling drugs or stolen goods on the premises will be reported to the police!

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You sure it was not a pro job? When I worked for a major tech company laptops would be regularly stolen from cars which stopped for petrol in a station near the UK HQ. The company were convinced that it was competitors re industrial spying and even ended up posting their own security in the petrol station.

To answer your question - best way to get the info you seek is to ask the local boys in blue.

Could you put an ad on gumtree sayng 'laptops wanted' and state your area? Obviously enormous personal risks involved here but you appear keen to get them back. Just be very careful whatever you decide to do.

It surprises me that many larger companies don't have their own refuelling facilities. It would stop problems like this and bring down fuel costs as they would be buying in bulk. Many, many years ago when my family had a bakery firm (long before I was born), we had our own petrol pump in front of the shop for use by company vans. A mate of mine who's dad was a builder had a diesel tank in his garden for company use too.

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I have learned from my own experience that a sealed boot is the only safe place for stuff.

Yep, try going any distance with firerams/ammo in anything else. Estate cars carry a lot but it's all visible unless you have a pull-across cover and the cover pulled across is like putting up a sign saying "please break in here". 4x4's aren'tmuch better, nor are vans as they scream to the world that you have loads of saleable tools on board. Unfortunaly, cars with bif boots are quite a rarety. On balance something high and difficult to see into, like a 4x4, with a settl safe welded in to it is probably the best bit.

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Car Boots, Back Alleys, or Pawn shops, plus possibly ebay?

One hopes you did put them out of sight, didn't you?

As far as I'm aware of, places like CEX, Cash Generator, etc.. will ask you for loads of ID, which puts a lot of crims off. With ebay, its all traceable, and with a car boot, they'd stick out like a sore thumb, so they probably sell them to punters looking for such a such...

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It surprises me that many larger companies don't have their own refuelling facilities. It would stop problems like this and bring down fuel costs as they would be buying in bulk. Many, many years ago when my family had a bakery firm (long before I was born), we had our own petrol pump in front of the shop for use by company vans. A mate of mine who's dad was a builder had a diesel tank in his garden for company use too.

In the US they did - they basically had a small town. Even if you dialed 911 the call did not go to the local Police but to the company's security people who would be on hand within minutes in their big 4x4s.

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Had a couple of laptops nicked from my car - virtually brand new Thinkpad t510s with i7 processors, 8gb ram and solid state hdds so they stand out like a sore thumb.

I'm keeping an eye on ebay, gumtree, cash converters and the local pc repair shops etc.

Both laptops were connected to windows domains and so were password protected.

They went on the night of 22nd/23rd so my bet is that whoever had them probably hasn't shifted them yet. They'd need to be reinstalled to get round the passwords/domain unless the thieving scum know what they are doing.

Where else should/could/might I be looking?

You got the serial numbers? I guess you do if they are company laptops (as on domain I'm assuming they are). Or should be able to get them from invoice.

Don't Lenovos have Computrace now? Don't suppose that was switched on? Maybe ask your IT support team, if they are company laptops, unless you don't want to go that route yet. Some companys use tracing software but for obvious reasons keep it a secret.

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You got the serial numbers? I guess you do if they are company laptops (as on domain I'm assuming they are). Or should be able to get them from invoice.

Don't Lenovos have Computrace now? Don't suppose that was switched on? Maybe ask your IT support team, if they are company laptops, unless you don't want to go that route yet. Some companys use tracing software but for obvious reasons keep it a secret.

I didn't know about computrace. The t500s support it through a bios update. Damn!

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My advice as a copper, I would say that most thefts from motor vehicles are committed by drug addicts and as somebody has already mentioned, they could be sold for a minimal sum on the street, in a pub or in a dodgy shop. Best bet would be to check local dodgy electrical/pawn shops as a potential buyer along with what you are already doing, eBay etc. Even though the likes of eBay are traceable, plenty of stolen property still gets sold on there. I have seen cars stolen and completely stripped down with parts sold on ebay within 24 hours. Just make sure the Police have the serial numbers as I have recovered many laptops that I have never been able to trace.

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My advice as a copper, I would say that most thefts from motor vehicles are committed by drug addicts and as somebody has already mentioned, they could be sold for a minimal sum on the street, in a pub or in a dodgy shop. Best bet would be to check local dodgy electrical/pawn shops as a potential buyer along with what you are already doing, eBay etc. Even though the likes of eBay are traceable, plenty of stolen property still gets sold on there. I have seen cars stolen and completely stripped down with parts sold on ebay within 24 hours. Just make sure the Police have the serial numbers as I have recovered many laptops that I have never been able to trace.

I've been thinking of getting some smartwater to tag my stuff (camera, laptop, wife's jwellry, etc.). Do many people use it in your experience, and is it effective?

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With ebay, its all traceable, and with a car boot, they'd stick out like a sore thumb, so they probably sell them to punters looking for such a such...

I assume you haven't been burgled recently?

We were, and it all appeared on eBay. I had photos to prove the items were mine (customised machinery, so very specific to me). The police didn't give two hoots. When they finally got round to asking the guy some questions(three weeks later), he claimed to have bought the items from a bloke in a pub. He pulled the auctions before completion, then obviously contacted the potential bidders and sold privately. Nothing to prove, no charges brought.

We were offered victim support and a crime number for the insurance, so plod did their job really...

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I assume you haven't been burgled recently?

We were, and it all appeared on eBay. I had photos to prove the items were mine (customised machinery, so very specific to me). The police didn't give two hoots. When they finally got round to asking the guy some questions(three weeks later), he claimed to have bought the items from a bloke in a pub. He pulled the auctions before completion, then obviously contacted the potential bidders and sold privately. Nothing to prove, no charges brought.

We were offered victim support and a crime number for the insurance, so plod did their job really...

A mate had his land rover defender nicked last year, it had lots of accessories like a snorkel, roof rack, towbars, etc. They all appeared on ebay a few weeks later.

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I assume you haven't been burgled recently?

We were, and it all appeared on eBay. I had photos to prove the items were mine (customised machinery, so very specific to me). The police didn't give two hoots. When they finally got round to asking the guy some questions(three weeks later), he claimed to have bought the items from a bloke in a pub. He pulled the auctions before completion, then obviously contacted the potential bidders and sold privately. Nothing to prove, no charges brought.

We were offered victim support and a crime number for the insurance, so plod did their job really...

Luckily I haven't, but my dad has had a lot of machinery (chainsaws, that sort of thing) stolen from his workshop...he had a vague idea of who it was, but he couldn't prove it, so he didn't bother reporting it....he also didn't want the hassle of them visiting him after the visit of the plod...

With ebay, you have to register a credit/debit card along with an address to open an account...

http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/columnists/article6074448.ece

It sounds as if ebay couldn't give a monkies...I suppose they think that ebay are so ineffective at dealing with stolen goods listings, its worth the risk...

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Don't get me wrong, I know exactly who the guy is, I know where he lives - so do the plod. However, if he doesn't keep it at home, doesn't end up selling it via ebay (only advertising it), the defence of "I bought it from a bloke and I sold it to a bloke" is watertight.

I'd be more inclined to beat him round the head with an iron bar, but I'm a bit right wing like that.

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I've been thinking of getting some smartwater to tag my stuff (camera, laptop, wife's jwellry, etc.). Do many people use it in your experience, and is it effective?

I'd like to tell you that all stolen property recovered is checked under UV light but unfortunately it isn't and it would be the exception rather than the norm, certainly in my force anyway (somewhere in the middle of England). Im sure other other forces use it more effectively.

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For exactly this reason both the Windows system partition and the Documents partition of my laptop are fully encrypted with Truecrypt. My laptop is also quite a high end one (I occasionally use it for playing out video and audio clips in conference presentations, and therefore have upgraded it to a 750gb hard drive, 4gb RAM and replaced the DVD drive with a BluRay drive), and as a university lecturer I also have some confidential data on there, e.g. feedback sheets for students' essays and exam papers, and so if it got stolen with no attempt made to protect that data I could be in serious trouble. I have therefore partitioned the hard drive as follows:

Boot sector - Windows bootloader, fully Truecrypt-encrypted. Pressing escape at the password prompt will go to the GRUB bootloader for Ubuntu on partition 1.

Partition 0 - 100 GB, Windows 7 system drive, fully Truecrypt-encrypted

Partition 1 - 50 GB, Ubuntu 10.10, unencrypted, includes GRUB bootloader.

Partition 2 - Ubuntu swapfile volume, 20gb, unencrypted

Partition 3 - 580 GB, documents and data, fully Truecrypt-encrypted

The Truecrypt password for Partition 2 is a different one to that of the boot sector / partition 1. So without knowing any passwords, someone stealing the laptop (if they're clever enough to reset the BIOS to factory defaults and thus get past the need to enter a password - again, different to the other two - at the BIOS stage) could get as far as the Ubuntu logon screen, but without cracking Truecrypt they wouldn't be able to get at any of my data. Still, I hope the thing doesn't get nicked because setting all that up on a replacement would be at least a day's work, even though my home contents insurance would provide the replacement.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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