Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
wtw2

€196 A Week Jsa In The Rep Of Ireland?

Recommended Posts

Going by the information in the below link, any adult over 25 years old in the Rep of Ireland gets €196 PER WEEK job seekers allowance.

Am I really reading this info correct? Thats £166.78 todays conversion rate!

Am I missing something?

My link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going by the information in the below link, any adult over 25 years old in the Rep of Ireland gets €196 PER WEEK job seekers allowance.

Am I really reading this info correct? Thats £166.78 todays conversion rate!

Am I missing something?

My link

In the UK there are other benefits such as council tax allowance and housing benefit. Maybe the Irish JSA includes some sort of equivalent allowance so you may not quite be comparing like with like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the UK there are other benefits such as council tax allowance and housing benefit. Maybe the Irish JSA includes some sort of equivalent allowance so you may not quite be comparing like with like?

Yes, IIRC that was the conclusion of a similar thread a few months ago.

In the UK the JSA is usually a very small share of the total benefits, particularly compared with Housing Benefits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, IIRC that was the conclusion of a similar thread a few months ago.

In the UK the JSA is usually a very small share of the total benefits, particularly compared with Housing Benefits.

Ok, well that clears that up then.

I dont know how these things work as I have never been on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, well that clears that up then.

I dont know how these things work as I have never been on them.

So you have been paying for them then. An equally valid reason to understand them ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going by the information in the below link, any adult over 25 years old in the Rep of Ireland gets €196 PER WEEK job seekers allowance.

Am I really reading this info correct?

Yes, but it's being further reduced to €188 from January 2011.

Thats £166.78 todays conversion rate!

Am I missing something?

1. The cost of living in the Republic of Ireland is higher than for the UK.

2. A €24 per week contribution towards rent may need to paid.

3. UK benefit rates are amongst the lowest in the developed world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the UK there are other benefits such as council tax allowance and housing benefit. Maybe the Irish JSA includes some sort of equivalent allowance so you may not quite be comparing like with like?

There is no Council Tax in the Republic of Ireland. Their benefit to cover private sector rent is called Rent Supplement:

http://www.welfare.ie/EN/Schemes/SupplementaryWelfareAllowance/Pages/RentSupplement.aspx

Rent Supplement is paid to people living in private rented accommodation who cannot provide for the cost of their accommodation from their own resources. In general, you will qualify for a rent supplement, if your only income is a social welfare or Health Services Executive (HSE) payment and you satisfy the other conditions - see 'Rules' below.

This requires a €24 contribution (recently increased from €18) before rent is covered up to a maximum amount as shown in 'Proposed Maximum Rent Limits From 1st June 2009':

http://www.welfare.ie/EN/Topics/Budget/bud09_apr/Pages/MaxRentLimitJune2009.aspx

The values refer to weekly values except for the values in Column 6, Column 7 and Column 8 for Dublin Kildare and Wicklow which are monthly values.

These rent limits have recently been reviewed as detailed in 'Review of Maximum Rent Limits 2010':

http://www.welfare.ie/EN/Policy/ResearchSurveysAndStatistics/Pages/rentreview2010.aspx

The Department currently funds approximately 50 per cent of the private sector rented accommodation. Accordingly, it is essential that State support for rents are kept under review, reflect current market conditions and do not distort the market in any way. This is the second review since rental prices reached their peak in 2007. Since the last review (June 2009), rental values have fallen on average, using CSO data (the most conservative) by 9.5%. Other sources showed reductions in rental prices of between 11.5% and 16%.

The increase in contribution to €24 is explained in 'Changes to the Rent Supplement Scheme from 1 June 2009':

http://www.welfare.ie/EN/Topics/Budget/bud09_apr/Pages/RentChangesJune09.aspx

The contribution of €24 a week is more in line with the minimum rent typically paid to local authorities in various parts of the country by their tenants.

Note that there is an entirely separate Household Benefits package payable to pensioners over 70 (with allowances for electricity, gas, landline or mobile phone, and free TV licence). There is also a separate Mortgage Interest Supplement for owner-occupiers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've said it before I'll say it again.

I'm on benefits and I don't get much of my benefits.

I get £52, just under 40% (this goes to tescos et. al.)

The landlord, whom the state gave the property to, for free, not long back gets about 50%

And the local council gets just over 10%

My cumulative benefits are around £130.

Which are far less than, the £160+ in Ireland, paid regardless of landlord or local council.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going by the information in the below link, any adult over 25 years old in the Rep of Ireland gets €196 PER WEEK job seekers allowance.

Am I really reading this info correct? Thats £166.78 todays conversion rate!

Am I missing something?

My link

No problem they can afford it :D and even if they cant the near neighbours will cough up 7 billion or so until the next boom :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you have been paying for them then. An equally valid reason to understand them ....

Im not paying for the Irish jsa as im in the UK, I understand now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im not paying for the Irish jsa as im in the UK, I understand now.

Unless of course, our cousins across the sea are unable to repay the 7 billion that we lent to them.

If that were to happen, you would be paying for a portion of the seemingly very generous Irish social safety net.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, would I be right in thinking the Irish have become overgenerous to their unemployed?

No!

The more that's distributed out to the poorest the more jobs are supported in the community. This will include pubs/clubs/small local chippys and shops, post offices and all the other local stuff.

This is the main reason all ours are shutting down in each recessionary time coz of the hijack of majority of wealth by the UK elites which constantly throws more people on the dole/scrapheap.

The same Elite bastards (who own our media) use the media to focus the gen population venom to attack these poor people who can't/don't answer back and some are bribed with a couple of hundred quid so the press/media can force a story out of them which is then written up as a 'general theme' going on amoung the poorer classes.

The non-distribution of wealth ie reduction of worth of benefits and pensions since the knobs destroyed the power of the unions from the 70's makes every recession even worse with ever more job losses and local pub/company/shop closures - as most should have noticed by now!

It's a deliberate destruction of local communities and local amenities by direct result of your Govt who are the shills of the Elites pulling their strings.

Meanwhile supermarkets are allowed to popup and Expand Exponentially - it's a vile s_tate s_ystem 'they' are putting in place with no social interaction as you would get in the old high streets!

They recently showed a series of programs

> Gloating over their deviousness <

- allowing people of Shepton Mallet to "rediscover" the local social interaction in a high-street

The code is in the word MaLL-et

Edited by erranta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going by the information in the below link, any adult over 25 years old in the Rep of Ireland gets €196 PER WEEK job seekers allowance.

Am I really reading this info correct? Thats £166.78 todays conversion rate!

Am I missing something?

My link

Didn't know that, thanks. Of course any allowance of this type is a short term bridge of course - it benefits the government to keep said claimant alive and kicking. Would it be better to pay someone less, or more during the brief period of unemployment? Hard to say. I'd personally prefer to see a meted out system of very high payment from the start (say £200), and subsequently drops by £20 per week thereafter. It gives that all important buffer, but prevents a fatal dependancy, which would lead to obviously the establishment of ghettos.

Edit: with the proviso that any job which the claimant quits having a bearing on the ceiling on benefit claims as well - to prevent a man from taking a job and then quitting to get the highest payment again straight away.

Edited by jammo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.