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The Ayatollah Buggeri

High Street Retailer Sneaky Sales Trick?

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I'm currently staying with my parents in south London during the Christmas / New Year period. In order to wall mount a new flat screen telly for them, I went into a certain high street hardware / DIY shop on Wimbledon Broadway yesterday, and bought some heavy duty expanding steel wallplugs. The label on the shelf display said £6.19. When I got to the checkout and after quite a long queue, I had the correct money ready and handed it over. That's not enough; they're £6.99, said the girl behind the counter. Not according to the label on the shelf, I replied. She made a great performance of calling someone else and stopping everything while she did, clearly in an attempt to turn the queue of people behind against me. In the end I decided that it wasn't worth making a fuss over 80p, and coughed up.

This morning the dimmer switch in one of their lights blew up, and I went back to the same shop to get a replacement (there's nowhere else within walking distance). Exactly the same thing happened, only this time the amount of money involved was significantly greater: £12.99 on the shelf label, but £17.99 asked for at the checkout. This time I did make a fuss: an assistant went to the shelf and agreed with me that it had been mislabelled, but refused to sell me the switch for less than £17.99. So even though it meant getting the car out, on principle I went to B & Q at New Malden and got one there.

Once I can put down to as a mistake, but twice? I wonder if this is a deliberate tactic: label stuff as costing a bit less than the average, reveal the 'mistake' at the checkout and count on a proportion of people deciding to cough up to avoid the hassle. I imagine that in a relatively affluent area (e.g. Wimbledon) and on low-value items, that scam would probably work quite well. I'm thinking about writing to the council's trading standards people about this.

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I'm currently staying with my parents in south London during the Christmas / New Year period. In order to wall mount a new flat screen telly for them, I went into a certain high street hardware / DIY shop on Wimbledon Broadway yesterday, and bought some heavy duty expanding steel wallplugs. The label on the shelf display said £6.19. When I got to the checkout and after quite a long queue, I had the correct money ready and handed it over. That's not enough; they're £6.99, said the girl behind the counter. Not according to the label on the shelf, I replied. She made a great performance of calling someone else and stopping everything while she did, clearly in an attempt to turn the queue of people behind against me. In the end I decided that it wasn't worth making a fuss over 80p, and coughed up.

This morning the dimmer switch in one of their lights blew up, and I went back to the same shop to get a replacement (there's nowhere else within walking distance). Exactly the same thing happened, only this time the amount of money involved was significantly greater: £12.99 on the shelf label, but £17.99 asked for at the checkout. This time I did make a fuss: an assistant went to the shelf and agreed with me that it had been mislabelled, but refused to sell me the switch for less than £17.99. So even though it meant getting the car out, on principle I went to B & Q at New Malden and got one there.

Once I can put down to as a mistake, but twice? I wonder if this is a deliberate tactic: label stuff as costing a bit less than the average, reveal the 'mistake' at the checkout and count on a proportion of people deciding to cough up to avoid the hassle. I imagine that in a relatively affluent area (e.g. Wimbledon) and on low-value items, that scam would probably work quite well. I'm thinking about writing to the council's trading standards people about this.

Yes, I've noticed that as well. What seems to have happened is that most of the shops put their prices *up* over Christmas for the Boxing Day sales, and in some cases, they have forgotten to change the shelf labels.

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It's legal due to the invitation to treat law thingie.

It is however a nasty short termist trick.

Fool me once, I get angry cough up

Fool me twice I discover online shopping and never visit your shop again.

Recent Chinese immigrants don't seem to realise this when they first open up they price things about average but skimp on everything to recoup the investment in the shop soon as possible. The first few weeks are ok, then they are absolutely dead as dead because of the above.

Much like a burger I had the other day, it was appaullingly bad (been bought out) I've bought burgers from this shop for years as you see them being made. I had a bite into one yesterday and thought WTF is that? And will never go there again. You know how you get bits of bone and veins this was chock full of them. They were using the PAD bit of topsides. As topsides need to be peeled and de-veined. Before the old owners used proper topside or the cap to make the burgers. But now they use the peeled bit and veins erk!

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They just broke the law. Take a photo of the shelf label and report to trading standards.

Indeed they have under The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008. Contact the local TS and give them the heads up.

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This is a common trick in many supermarkets now. I regularly find myself having to correct the prices when I check my till receipt with the advertised prices.

Another supermarket trick is putting up a big reduction or special offer sign for a product - i.e. BOGOF or 3 for 2, etc - but placing the sign in front of the wrong but similar product.

I notice that when you catch Tesco out with this they appear to have a policy of giving you that product for free but the likes of Sainsburys, M&S an others appear to feint ignorance.

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This is a common trick in many supermarkets now. I regularly find myself having to correct the prices when I check my till receipt with the advertised prices.

Another supermarket trick is putting up a big reduction or special offer sign for a product - i.e. BOGOF or 3 for 2, etc - but placing the sign in front of the wrong but similar product.

I notice that when you catch Tesco out with this they appear to have a policy of giving you that product for free but the likes of Sainsburys, M&S an others appear to feint ignorance.

Seen that a few times.

The best trick I've seen is with meat as they have a really big red sticker on saying £4.99 in big white letters, then in very small letters per kilo, and then you see the actual price of the joint is £12.99 etc... in very faint white numbers. The wife's mother fell for that the other day thought she'd got a really cheap joint until she got home and checked the receipt suddenly she realised she'd paid about £14 for it.

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Seen that a few times.

The best trick I've seen is with meat as they have a really big red sticker on saying £4.99 in big white letters, then in very small letters per kilo, and then you see the actual price of the joint is £12.99 etc... in very faint white numbers. The wife's mother fell for that the other day thought she'd got a really cheap joint until she got home and checked the receipt suddenly she realised she'd paid about £14 for it.

Yes, fallen for that a few times in the cold meats section. End up with several slices of cooked ham or suchlike walking away from the counter trying to figure out why it is costing more than a ready roasted chicken. Usually too embarassed to just leave it. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't.

Another one which you sometimes see on deli counters - and I can only think this is to meet departmental targets - is when you ask for X slices of such and such cooked meat and they slice it very thickly, even if you have asked for it thin, which can push the price up dramatically.

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Another supermarket trick is putting up a big reduction or special offer sign for a product - i.e. BOGOF or 3 for 2, etc - but placing the sign in front of the wrong but similar product.

This is a favourite trick of safeway.

The other is items having offers like 50% off or BOGOF which never occur at the till.

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This is a common trick in many supermarkets now. I regularly find myself having to correct the prices when I check my till receipt with the advertised prices.

Another supermarket trick is putting up a big reduction or special offer sign for a product - i.e. BOGOF or 3 for 2, etc - but placing the sign in front of the wrong but similar product.

I notice that when you catch Tesco out with this they appear to have a policy of giving you that product for free but the likes of Sainsburys, M&S an others appear to feint ignorance.

Ah we get back to the old tactic that works a treat.

If they quibble the price on one item, make sure you have a trolley load of shopping with you at the till. When they refuse to agree the price, just say, "well in that case we clearly can't agree to do business" and walk out leaving the trolley load of groceries behind.

You''ll probably see the assistant panic and call the manager, and normally they back down.

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Always always always buy food and drink according to the price per kg/litre.

50% off, BOGOF, 3 for 2, etc etc ad infinitum are just ways to trick you into overpaying, and moreover to turn you into a confused CONsumer who does not understand what things should cost. It does not take that much effort to learn the appropriate price per kg for common foodstuffs.

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Seen that a few times.

The best trick I've seen is with meat as they have a really big red sticker on saying £4.99 in big white letters, then in very small letters per kilo, and then you see the actual price of the joint is £12.99 etc... in very faint white numbers. The wife's mother fell for that the other day thought she'd got a really cheap joint until she got home and checked the receipt suddenly she realised she'd paid about £14 for it.

Made a big mistake for Xmas dinner. We bought lamb on 23rd and it was about £9 and no "reduced" tag on it. I didn't even think to look at the best before date until Xmas Eve when I noticed use by 23rd. Considering we bought it on the evening of the 23rd for no reduction I thought this was a bit off. The meat was even more off and a whole side was slightly putrified by Xmas Day. Still we ate the other half and I'm stil alive, but I should've checked that one.

edit: From Sainsburys (don't want them getting off the hook. Now I'm thinking of it, the same Sainsburys flogged me another product about 6 months ago that was almost 3 months out of date).

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Try buying a box of screws or nails from any DIY shed.... the open display boxes are crammed to the lid.... the sealed boxes they expect you to buy are no more than half full. Opening two boxes and tipping them into one is the logical solution..... but it makes the duty manager very cross.... it my case cross enough to get me barred :lol:

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The label on the shelf display said £6.19. When I got to the checkout and after quite a long queue, I had the correct money ready and handed it over. That's not enough; they're £6.99, said the girl behind the counter. Not according to the label on the shelf, I replied. She made a great performance of calling someone else and stopping everything while she did, clearly in an attempt to turn the queue of people behind against me. In the end I decided that it wasn't worth making a fuss over 80p, and coughed up.

...

Always watch the price they ring up. Always make a fuss if you notice a problem. Stand your ground for long enough and they will often back down. At the very least waste as much of their time as you can in return for their wasting of your time. Get the manager down - take them to see the price on the shelf, etc. Sod the queue - it's for their benefit too in the long run.

If enough of us kick up a fuss they will stop playing silly buggers. (Or at least find some other trick.)

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If I think I've been wronged I usually rectify myself by taking produce of the equivalent value. I usually spot it at the time though.

It does tend to be supermarkets that do this scam the most, clothes shops tend to be the other way, but I put that down to the incompetence of the systems at house of fraser and the like.

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Made a big mistake for Xmas dinner. We bought lamb on 23rd and it was about £9 and no "reduced" tag on it. I didn't even think to look at the best before date until Xmas Eve when I noticed use by 23rd. Considering we bought it on the evening of the 23rd for no reduction I thought this was a bit off. The meat was even more off and a whole side was slightly putrified by Xmas Day. Still we ate the other half and I'm stil alive, but I should've checked that one.

edit: From Sainsburys (don't want them getting off the hook. Now I'm thinking of it, the same Sainsburys flogged me another product about 6 months ago that was almost 3 months out of date).

I always make a point of pulling out the stuff from the back of the shelves in tesco or sainsbury. They always stack so that the short dated stuff is at the front. Whatever I buy I want the freshest that I can get.

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I always make a point of pulling out the stuff from the back of the shelves in tesco or sainsbury. They always stack so that the short dated stuff is at the front. Whatever I buy I want the freshest that I can get.

I normally do this without a second thought as well but didn't that day for some reason. I tried it today with lamb chops but the date was the same all the way to the back.

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I'm currently staying with my parents in south London during the Christmas / New Year period. In order to wall mount a new flat screen telly for them, I went into a certain high street hardware / DIY shop on Wimbledon Broadway yesterday, and bought some heavy duty expanding steel wallplugs. The label on the shelf display said £6.19. When I got to the checkout and after quite a long queue, I had the correct money ready and handed it over. That's not enough; they're £6.99, said the girl behind the counter. Not according to the label on the shelf, I replied. She made a great performance of calling someone else and stopping everything while she did, clearly in an attempt to turn the queue of people behind against me. In the end I decided that it wasn't worth making a fuss over 80p, and coughed up.

This morning the dimmer switch in one of their lights blew up, and I went back to the same shop to get a replacement (there's nowhere else within walking distance). Exactly the same thing happened, only this time the amount of money involved was significantly greater: £12.99 on the shelf label, but £17.99 asked for at the checkout. This time I did make a fuss: an assistant went to the shelf and agreed with me that it had been mislabelled, but refused to sell me the switch for less than £17.99. So even though it meant getting the car out, on principle I went to B & Q at New Malden and got one there.

Once I can put down to as a mistake, but twice? I wonder if this is a deliberate tactic: label stuff as costing a bit less than the average, reveal the 'mistake' at the checkout and count on a proportion of people deciding to cough up to avoid the hassle. I imagine that in a relatively affluent area (e.g. Wimbledon) and on low-value items, that scam would probably work quite well. I'm thinking about writing to the council's trading standards people about this.

If a product is 'advertised' cheaper on the shelves, the shop doesn't have to sell it to you for that amount. Trading Standards might not be interested. But if it's a common thing with this shop doing it all the time, then it is indeed entrapping the customers and using their good nature against them, as most people will cough up most of the time.

I'd have probably paid up the first time over 80p and thought it was a mistake. The second time i'd have told them to stick it up their a*se and have gotten one off ebay for about 80% less than the RRP.

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If a product is 'advertised' cheaper on the shelves, the shop doesn't have to sell it to you for that amount. Trading Standards might not be interested. But if it's a common thing with this shop doing it all the time, then it is indeed entrapping the customers and using their good nature against them, as most people will cough up most of the time.

I'd have probably paid up the first time over 80p and thought it was a mistake. The second time i'd have told them to stick it up their a*se and have gotten one off ebay for about 80% less than the RRP.

Funny - years ago I worked at toysrus and the manager went into a right lather if we didn't get the labels right - apparently it would bring down the wrath of the enforcement gods upon his head.

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It will be incompetence. No large chain would have any deliberate policy to deceive or would want frequent scenes between staff and customers at the till.

The price file on the till will have been updated but the staff won't have changed the shelf edge labels. The staff should still offer it at the old price for good customer service but if you're not careful and allow staff to continually alter prices manually you'll soon have defeated the whole object of an EPOS system.

Law is a grey area as there would have to have been intent to deceive as obviously e&oe would apply. If a number had fallen off the windscreen of a car on a dealer's forecourt they wouldn't have to sell it to you for £495.

Incidentally, retailers have been given special dispensation to charge more at the till than the shelf edge label or price mark for the period of the vat increase.

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Another 'trick' I have come across several times in supermarkets is multipacks priced higher than buying the equivalent items singly. People tend to assume that bulk packages are cheaper, or at least cost no more, and don't check. This even happens when the single items are not advertised as a special promotional offer.

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Another 'trick' I have come across several times in supermarkets is multipacks priced higher than buying the equivalent items singly. People tend to assume that bulk packages are cheaper, or at least cost no more, and don't check. This even happens when the single items are not advertised as a special promotional offer.

sainsbury and tesco do this a lot but they will price the bulk/larger item pence per kilo and then the smaller item in pence per 100g.

I laughed in tesco a week ago when I looked at pot noodles. There were 3 flavours side by side on a shelf, one priced per 10g, one per 100g and one per kilo.

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I'm currently staying with my parents in south London during the Christmas / New Year period. In order to wall mount a new flat screen telly for them, I went into a certain high street hardware / DIY shop on Wimbledon Broadway yesterday, and bought some heavy duty expanding steel wallplugs. The label on the shelf display said £6.19. When I got to the checkout and after quite a long queue, I had the correct money ready and handed it over. That's not enough; they're £6.99, said the girl behind the counter. Not according to the label on the shelf, I replied. She made a great performance of calling someone else and stopping everything while she did, clearly in an attempt to turn the queue of people behind against me. In the end I decided that it wasn't worth making a fuss over 80p, and coughed up.

This morning the dimmer switch in one of their lights blew up, and I went back to the same shop to get a replacement (there's nowhere else within walking distance). Exactly the same thing happened, only this time the amount of money involved was significantly greater: £12.99 on the shelf label, but £17.99 asked for at the checkout. This time I did make a fuss: an assistant went to the shelf and agreed with me that it had been mislabelled, but refused to sell me the switch for less than £17.99. So even though it meant getting the car out, on principle I went to B & Q at New Malden and got one there.

Once I can put down to as a mistake, but twice? I wonder if this is a deliberate tactic: label stuff as costing a bit less than the average, reveal the 'mistake' at the checkout and count on a proportion of people deciding to cough up to avoid the hassle. I imagine that in a relatively affluent area (e.g. Wimbledon) and on low-value items, that scam would probably work quite well. I'm thinking about writing to the council's trading standards people about this.

Definitely, do it as a matter of urgency. It may be that both were a genuine mistake but you never know. In all probability it's fvck-up rather than intentional but they need to have it pointed out to them. They are extracting the urine, quite honestly.

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Funny - years ago I worked at toysrus and the manager went into a right lather if we didn't get the labels right - apparently it would bring down the wrath of the enforcement gods upon his head.

It will becasuse there are trading standards rules which they will fall foul of. From a contractual point of view though, the price on the shelf is not legally enforcable contracually speaking. The contract is made at the checkout so you cannot insist that the shelf price is the correct one.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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