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Waste Crisis Means 80 Giant Furnaces Set For Go-Ahead In 2011

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http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/green-living/waste-crisis-means-80-giant-furnaces-set-for-goahead-in-2011-2170387.html

A grassroots revolt is growing over a new generation of controversial incinerators planned across the UK, which would see the amount of household waste sent to be burnt more than double. Incinerators are currently being planned on more than 80 sites under the so-called "dash for ash".

The Coalition must decide this summer whether to give its blessing to the £10bn roll-out of the new incinerator chimneys, which continue to meet fierce levels of local resistance from those who would live in their shadow. Concern over possible health risks and impact on property prices looks likely to make incineration one of the most toxic political issues of 2011.

Vehement opposition also comes from environmentalists, who claim that incinerators contribute to greenhouse gases and discourage councils from meeting more ambitious recycling goals.

According to the Environment Agency there are 21 facilities in the UK currently treating municipal waste, while a further eight have been given the go-ahead but are not yet operational. It is estimated that a further two dozen "energy from waste" schemes are still making their way through the planning process or awaiting a final decision from the Secretary of State.

And the waste industry is promising a "step change" in burning Britain's annual rubbish mountain. It believes that "many more" will still be needed in the medium term to meet the previous government's goal of turning 25 per cent of municipal waste into energy to heat homes and provide electricity over the next decade, and prevent Britain from paying millions of pounds in future EU landfill fines.

.........

"But when an incinerator is proposed they become alarmed at the health impact and this gets them to take to the internet. Then they realise they are very expensive and that there are other viable alternatives such as anerobic digestion which is renewable.

"No one is arguing that incinerators improve people's health. The debate is about how much local people's health will be depreciated.

I wonder how much of household waste can effectively be recycled and how much really is useless waste.

How many people are arguing that incinerators make no impact on peoples health, it's a ridiculous statement in a sense to make that they don't "improve" people's health. Although if the rubbish can't be dumped/burned and just gets left in the street I'm sure that burning it will "improve" health as leaving it on the streets will cause massive health problems.

Although I find it interesting that the article doesn't really offer any real alternative to burning, can any Greens on here offer an economically cost effect option to burning? I'm all for recycling and do as much as I can but we do still mostly end up with a full bin each week. Got a composter, two bins for recycling glass/tins and another for plastics that the council won't take which I take to the local supermarket for recycling, plus the paper/cardboard bin.

So what else can be done to reduce the amount of crap we bin? And of course more importantly stop incinerators being built which will affect house prices.

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Burning plastic is insane - there's a way of salvaging the oil in it isn't there?

We recycle paper, cardboard, food waste, tins, glass and some plastics... so what is left to burn?

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http://www.thestar.co.uk/headlines/Incinerator-may-get-other-towns.6668317.jp

OPERATORS of Sheffield's waste incinerator have submitted an application to accept more rubbish from neighbouring areas – because the volume of waste generated in the city is falling.

Veolia Environmental Services claim the Sheffield Energy Recovery Facility on Bernard Road has started receiving less rubbish as the council's new kerbside recycling scheme kicks in.

Bosses say forecasts for the next six yeas show the £45 million plant, which was opened in 2006, will soon start operating at a shortfall – generating less electricity and less heat for the district energy network.

According to the terms of the facility's planning permission, Veolia can only accept 10 per cent of its rubbish from Rotherham and North East Derbyshire councils.

They now want to increase what they take from other authorities to 22 per cent – enabling them to accept waste from Barnsley, Doncaster and Bassetlaw – which will keep the site running at capacity.

Nigel Williams, Sheffield director of Veolia Environmental, said the proposals will not change the external appearance or capacity of the incinerator.

He said: "We want to be very transparent with the planning application and make sure everyone is fully aware of the proposals.

"The Energy Recovery Facility currently receives some waste from neighbouring areas and the proposed change is aimed at maintaining the facility to capacity so that, in turn, heat and electricity generation is optimised.

And if you do build more what happens when people recycle more and you run out of rubbish?

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http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/Proud-record-of-waste-dumping.3614432.jp

"We need a regional approach in which incineration is the disposal method of last resort. This report shows just how hide-bound the council is by having signed a 35-year contract for incineration," Coun Creasy said.

And then you got big juicy public sector contracts for 35 years!!!

Although I'm sure the lawyers put in break clauses where the local council can walk away and minimum cost.... :ph34r:

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I agree that we should all recycle what we can.

After that, incineration seems preferable to landfill, IMO.

I lived in Huddersfield for a few years and didn't notice any impact from their incineration plant.

There is an incinerator proposed for the area where I currently live and I couldn't help but notice that many "anti" protesters were of a certain age... old enough to have spent 50 years sending all their waste to landfill. Bunch of NIMBY hypocrites.

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http://www.thestar.c...ping.3614432.jp

And then you got big juicy public sector contracts for 35 years!!!

Although I'm sure the lawyers put in break clauses where the local council can walk away and minimum cost.... :ph34r:

Yet another example of private sector businesses skimming, scamming and scumming off the 'taxpayer' quite probably with an otherwise unviable business model. Simple to see where the public sector deficit ends up when it comes under pressure. Unviable private businesses.

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I remember a big hoo-ha about one of these in Nottingham a few years back.

It was in the middle of a half derilict industrial estate, chemical plants already there, the nearest residential areas (meadows, sneinton) crime infested crap holes, and the half dozen yuppies who had been taken in by the estate agents guff and ended up living there were more bothered by a bloody chimney. Some people.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/nottinghamshire/4531184.stm

Plus it produces power

http://www.wrg.co.uk/page.php?article=709&name=Eastcroft+Energy+from+Waste+Facility

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Burning plastic is insane - there's a way of salvaging the oil in it isn't there?

We recycle paper, cardboard, food waste, tins, glass and some plastics... so what is left to burn?

It is very foolish. It has been interesting to see over the last year that pyrolysis is maturing as an industry. At the moment with plastics, but as it beds in it will move on to paper waste, general household waste and ultimately sewage sludge. This is one of the few green technologies I would consider for short term subsidies, as it kills a lot of birds with one stone. Rubbish in, diesel, high quality chemicals and charcoal out. Unlike incineration it has very low risk of carcinogens. Win-win all round.

http://www.letsrecycle.com/do/ecco.py/view_item?listid=37&listcatid=217&listitemid=56650&section=plastics

http://www.theengineer.co.uk/news/pyrolysis-oils-produce-high-value-feedstocks/1006367.article

http://www.renewableenergyfocus.com/view/14781/uk-wastetoenergy-plant-gets-green-light/

http://www.tgdaily.com/sustainability-features/53244-new-technology-can-recycle-all-plastics

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I wonder how much of household waste can effectively be recycled and how much really is useless waste.

What is wrong with incineration anyway? Sweden incinerates 47% of household waste (2006 data)

http://www.canurb.com/media/Presentations/UL_19/MSchonning140606.pdf page 17

• Energy recovery through incineration provides electricity

AND heat (cogeneration);

• Cogeneration utilizes 90% of energy input, whereas

electricity-generation only, utilizes 40% of input;

• Increased energy production from waste reduces CO2

emissions and contribute to fulfilling the Kyoto protocol,

through the replacement of fossil fuels and lower

methane-emissions;

• Ashes from energy production serve as construction

material for civil engineering.

Seems like "everyone wins" situation to me

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What we need is edible packaging, that way there will be less to throw away.

Heard of edible panties? Much the same thing but not quite as pleasurable :lol:

Well that depends on who's been wearing them !

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Malmo does district heating stuff like this ... do the uk versions though?

Yes. They do.

The Sheffield scheme (referred to in the article) provides heating to the University buildings, local government offices, and city centre shops and offices (this might not be complete - they were installing the massive underground hot-water mains in 2008 leading to the city centre commercial area, and I don't know what's happened since then). The university and government offices were already supplied, as the old incinerator had previously piped heat to them.

One of the difficulties that the Sheffield energy recovery facility now faces is that their supply of waste has reduced, due to promotion of recycling - this means that they do sometimes run short of heat, and have to burn gas to ensure that their heat supply remains operational. The difficulty is that their permits don't currently allow unrecyclable waste to be brought in from 'out of area' to supplement the local waste.

However, the UK's biggest scheme (South east London combined heat and power) doesn't actually offer any heat supply - they only produce power, because the large offices and large housing blocks (with local community heating systems) decided not replace their gas heating equipment, instead of connect to the SELCHP waste heat stream. It had been part of SELCHP's plan that all these blocks would need to replace their community heating facilities, and this would correspond with the availability of SELCHP's heat supply. It never actually happened.

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I'm currently working in the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) sector, so hopefully can add an informed comment or two. Energy from waste does not necessarily mean incineration. The big drive at the moment in the industry is with anaerobic digestion (AD). There are many processes but simplistically, waste is typically subjected to separation techniques (sizing, magnets etc) then pulped (with recycled process water) before being fed to anaerobic (thermophillic or mesophillic) bacteria which generate bio-gas (methane and carbon dioxide). This can be burned in CHP plant to generate heat (for onsite process purposes) and electricity for the national grid. The solid waste left over may be pasteurised and is suitable for combustion as fuel or use as a soil improver etc.

I'm happy to share more technical details if anyone is interested.

http://www.waste-management-world.com/index/display/article-display/339836/articles/waste-management-world/volume-9/issue-4/features/state-of-the-art-2008-anaerobic-digestion-of-solid-waste.html

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I'm currently working in the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) sector, so hopefully can add an informed comment or two. Energy from waste does not necessarily mean incineration. The big drive at the moment in the industry is with anaerobic digestion (AD). There are many processes but simplistically, waste is typically subjected to separation techniques (sizing, magnets etc) then pulped (with recycled process water) before being fed to anaerobic (thermophillic or mesophillic) bacteria which generate bio-gas (methane and carbon dioxide). This can be burned in CHP plant to generate heat (for onsite process purposes) and electricity for the national grid. The solid waste left over may be pasteurised and is suitable for combustion as fuel or use as a soil improver etc.

I'm happy to share more technical details if anyone is interested.

http://www.waste-management-world.com/index/display/article-display/339836/articles/waste-management-world/volume-9/issue-4/features/state-of-the-art-2008-anaerobic-digestion-of-solid-waste.html

I'm more interested in knowing how far off this technology is from being cost neutral ie the waste companies collect our rubbish for free, rather than me having to pay the council to pay a 3rd party to come and collect it and for them to burn it.

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I'm currently working in the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) sector, so hopefully can add an informed comment or two. Energy from waste does not necessarily mean incineration. The big drive at the moment in the industry is with anaerobic digestion (AD). There are many processes but simplistically, waste is typically subjected to separation techniques (sizing, magnets etc) then pulped (with recycled process water) before being fed to anaerobic (thermophillic or mesophillic) bacteria which generate bio-gas (methane and carbon dioxide). This can be burned in CHP plant to generate heat (for onsite process purposes) and electricity for the national grid. The solid waste left over may be pasteurised and is suitable for combustion as fuel or use as a soil improver etc.

I'm happy to share more technical details if anyone is interested.

http://www.waste-management-world.com/index/display/article-display/339836/articles/waste-management-world/volume-9/issue-4/features/state-of-the-art-2008-anaerobic-digestion-of-solid-waste.html

Aren't AD plants as big and smelly and incinerators... they just produce more energy?

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This is all just NIMBY bo***cks.

I don't want rubbish burnt I don't want landfill I'll use as much packaging as I like to stick it up the eco-nazis I'm sick of the greens and socialist government interference and why the hell isn't my rubbish recycled for me by the government and why can't it just disappear and why do I have to do anything why aren't the council doing it and why aren't they losing their jobs yet and why am I paying tax where's my Daily Mail......

T*ssers.

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Tsk the incinerators are for body disposal. When TSHTF people will riot and rise up and attempt to take the government down by force.

This will fail as machine gun technology has improved massively also big brother has apache gunships. I'd like to see how you;d take one of those out in hand to 30mm cannon combat! 1-3 million of us will be gunned down and the bodies simply can't be pushed into the sea or thrown into the canals.

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I'm more interested in knowing how far off this technology is from being cost neutral ie the waste companies collect our rubbish for free, rather than me having to pay the council to pay a 3rd party to come and collect it and for them to burn it.

You will always pay as it is a deterent to you being wasteful.

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I remember a big hoo-ha about one of these in Nottingham a few years back.

It was in the middle of a half derilict industrial estate, chemical plants already there, the nearest residential areas (meadows, sneinton) crime infested crap holes, and the half dozen yuppies who had been taken in by the estate agents guff and ended up living there were more bothered by a bloody chimney. Some people.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/nottinghamshire/4531184.stm

Plus it produces power

http://www.wrg.co.uk/page.php?article=709&name=Eastcroft+Energy+from+Waste+Facility

plus there's been an incinerator on that site since the 1970s, heating local housing and shopping centres.

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Tsk the incinerators are for body disposal. When TSHTF people will riot and rise up and attempt to take the government down by force.

This will fail as machine gun technology has improved massively also big brother has apache gunships. I'd like to see how you;d take one of those out in hand to 30mm cannon combat! 1-3 million of us will be gunned down and the bodies simply can't be pushed into the sea or thrown into the canals.

Don't be daft, the meat can be sold down the market at £3 a kg and labelled as 'lamb'.

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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