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Has Anyone Tried These Wine Brewing Kits?

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I've been looking at these home brew wine kits over the past couple of days. Normally the words "home brew" and "wine" would have me running in the opposite direction very quickly, in terror of the usual elderflower and daffodil type monstrosities. But if you google around a little, there are kits like these for all sorts - Merlot, Cotes du Rhone etc.

Amazon link - (you can get them cheaper and far more choice elsewhere, but this gives the jist of it).

Just wondering if anyone has tried this before, and whether it is any good. Obviously I'm not expecting Chateaneuf sort of quality, but if it's drinkable plonk then it seems like a fun way to remove some discretionary taxation from my life.

Any experiences or tips very welcome :)

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I do lots of wine from kits as it's just about all we drink here. It saves us a fortune. I think I've only done one of the WineBuddy ones quite a while ago. It was ok but not great. From memory they use highly concentrated grape juice and include a packed of very highly concentrated flavouring or something.

The kit whown there says it includes everything you need but doesn't say what it contains, specifically. You'll need two fermenting buckets for a start, or just a couple of 1 gallon large plastic water bottles as it's a 6 bottle kit. If you are going to end up doing it on a regular basis you may as well spend a little but more and get a couple of 5 gallon fermenters and a bit more kit and do a 30 bottle one at one go. I have one of these CC Zinfandel Blush on the go pretty much constantly and would highly reccoment it. Think I pay £39.50 at my local home brew shop, you just can't go wrong with these.

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Thanks for the reply - that sounds more promising that I thought it would be ;)

No problem on the actual kit - I'm thinking of doing beer too, so was going to call into a local brewing store and get myself kitted out for both. One quick question - what sort of temperature do you need for this? From the sounds of it, you're making stuff all year round, so are you using an airing cupboard or something?

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Thanks for the reply - that sounds more promising that I thought it would be ;)

No problem on the actual kit - I'm thinking of doing beer too, so was going to call into a local brewing store and get myself kitted out for both. One quick question - what sort of temperature do you need for this? From the sounds of it, you're making stuff all year round, so are you using an airing cupboard or something?

It needs to be at 20-25c. I brew in our utility which is basically the back of the garage with no heating so I use a heat-belt round the barrel to keep it at temperature. I think the last one I bought was about £16 and they draw something tiny like 5Watts. Okay, it's a bit more outlay but it really isn't much when you consider what you save and you'll save a lot if you anything like a regular moderate drinker. Once you've bought the barrels and one or two other pieces of equipment which are reusable you can produce really good wine for just under £1.40 a bottle. I've certainly had wine that the supermarkets do at 8 or 10 quid a bottle (bought it on offer though) which was no better than a decent kit wine.

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If you are going to make beer use spray malt or beerkit enhancer in place of sugar. For the extra 20-30% cost it is worth it.

This forum should tell you all you need.

http://www.jimsbeerkit.co.uk/forum/viewforum.php?f=4

I was amused - but not surprised to find you on this thread.

To other members. I don't drink myself but I am told the Exit's brews are better than the real thing. He bottled some in a genuine bottle of something or other. His friend put it in his fridge and when he got home he found his wife had drunk it. She commented "That bottle of ****** you left in the fridge was lovely." :rolleyes:

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I was amused - but not surprised to find you on this thread.

To other members. I don't drink myself but I am told the Exit's brews are better than the real thing. He bottled some in a genuine bottle of something or other. His friend put it in his fridge and when he got home he found his wife had drunk it. She commented "That bottle of ****** you left in the fridge was lovely." :rolleyes:

His wife drunk his beer, and then rubbed his nose in it by telling him how nice it was !!

Shocking behaviour.

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Never did wine.. but I always used to like the Geordie Yorkshire Bitter kit (tried a few others and they were nowhere near as good).

The only advice I would offer is investing in the bottles instead of a keg (don't forget to put half a teaspoon of sugar in each bottle so it doesn't come out flat!)

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I made some once from a load of over-ripe bananas that I bought from the greengrocers for next to nothing, it was lovely!

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I've been looking at these home brew wine kits over the past couple of days. Normally the words "home brew" and "wine" would have me running in the opposite direction very quickly, in terror of the usual elderflower and daffodil type monstrosities. But if you google around a little, there are kits like these for all sorts - Merlot, Cotes du Rhone etc.

Amazon link - (you can get them cheaper and far more choice elsewhere, but this gives the jist of it).

Just wondering if anyone has tried this before, and whether it is any good. Obviously I'm not expecting Chateaneuf sort of quality, but if it's drinkable plonk then it seems like a fun way to remove some discretionary taxation from my life.

Any experiences or tips very welcome :)

Ensure everything is immaculately clean.

Keep the temperatures right at all times.

Don't skimp on ingredients or buy budget kits.

Then it should be all good.

Further personal experience - elderberry & rice wine are bankers.

Making 32 pints with a 40 pint kit always worked well for me - but then I like strong, malty beer.

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..All you need is this, some serialising fluid, demijohn, airlock, concentrate, yeast and sugar and a warm place, for wine or cider....two to six weeks ready ;)

homemade-cider-reduced.jpg

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This takes me back, I used to make wine whilst I was at secondary school - I was a weird sort of science geek kid.

The best wines I made were never with the kits, but from fruit, be grapes or something ie apples (ok cider), kiwi, strawberries etc.

I once made some cracking cider using champagne style yeast and garden apples. The worst effort involved rhubarb and franking could have doubled up as toilet disinfectant.

As a rule of thumb, the homebrew beer kits tend to be much better than the wine ones.

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Never did wine.. but I always used to like the Geordie Yorkshire Bitter kit (tried a few others and they were nowhere near as good).

The only advice I would offer is investing in the bottles instead of a keg (don't forget to put half a teaspoon of sugar in each bottle so it doesn't come out flat!)

got a muntons premium gold ale kit and the kit to do it all for chrimbo 2 years ago, anyway my kids done all the work and herindoors helped ... she said it would be ready in a week to transfer to the barrel , i thought bloody hell thats quick....... started to drink it ..abit cloudy but tasted ok . as i like a couple of beers at the end of the day i must of had 4-6 pints the next day i had wind like you would not believe, so i phoned the shop as the mrs had chucked out the packaging and could,nt stop laughing...... something to do with yeast and 4 weeks was all i could understand :o

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I have done wine and beer.

Wifey didnt like beer as it made the house smell. I always kept it in doors because of the temp.

I have made some good wines, both from kits and of my own but it takes a lot of effort. It needs to be done right, kept at the right temp and all the kit has to be cleaned and sterilised etc etc. For £5 a bottle I would rather just buy it now or drink cider instead for next to nothing.

Beer is far easier though imo.

If you want to dabble in something easier try making flavoured vodka. ***** a bowl full of damsens/whatever and soak them in vodka for a week. Strain out the fruit and bottle the cherry/damsen/whatever vodka.

My dad used to do something with marrows and melons, something about cutting a hole in it and putting sugar/may be yeast inside then leaving it on the windowsill.

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I have done wine and beer.

Wifey didnt like beer as it made the house smell. I always kept it in doors because of the temp.

I have made some good wines, both from kits and of my own but it takes a lot of effort. It needs to be done right, kept at the right temp and all the kit has to be cleaned and sterilised etc etc. For £5 a bottle I would rather just buy it now or drink cider instead for next to nothing.

Beer is far easier though imo.

If you want to dabble in something easier try making flavoured vodka. ***** a bowl full of damsens/whatever and soak them in vodka for a week. Strain out the fruit and bottle the cherry/damsen/whatever vodka.

My dad used to do something with marrows and melons, something about cutting a hole in it and putting sugar/may be yeast inside then leaving it on the windowsill.

a mate of mine did a stretch for 3 months and he said all the lags kept their fruit put it in a bucket chucked in bread .... hey presto :lol:

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You don't need all the fancy jazz.

I've been making wine for years, you don't need to bother too much about secondary fermentation, temperature, etc too much, all you need is:

Equipment

Demijohn (5l plastic water bottle is fine)

Airlock and bung (or a balloon but I've never tried this)

Syphon tube

Milton sterilizing tablets

Funnel

Filter paper or a clean nylon stocking

Ingredients

Sugar Ik

Yeast 1tsp (I find ordinary bread yeast works ok but for stronger or fizzy booze you can order a special kind from wine shops)

Nutrient 1tsp (from wine shops)

Any kind of fruit, veg, herb or even herbal teabags

Method

Sterilise everything with the Milton tablets.

Boil enough of your fruit/veg/herbs/teabags to make 3l of liquid with good colour but not mushy/cloudy.

Strain it into the demijohn.

Boil two litres of water and dissolve the sugar completely and add to the demijohn.

Allow to cool until lukewarm.

Add the yeast and nutrient.

Put in the bung and airlock.

Keep the demijohn in a warm place like an airing cupboard or near a radiator or pipes.

Within 24 hours it should start fermenting and bubbling, this will last for three weeks or so then it's ready to bottle. Don't let your syphon tube touch the sediment when you suck out the wine.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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