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Look Out For Burst Pipes!

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I have multiple burst pipes in the loft, well my landlord does. Its going to affect alot of people and cant be good for rising house prices!

First thing to do is turn off the cold mains, run the baths and basins to empty the tank in the loft if you have one. Fill the kettle and some other containers so you have water to drink. Disasters are much easier to handle when there is tea to drink. Turn off valves in airing cupboard. Obviously get containers and towels to catch the water. Then investigate which pipes are busted so as to know what route you need to take to get them fixed.

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I have multiple burst pipes in the loft, well my landlord does. Its going to affect alot of people and cant be good for rising house prices!

First thing to do is turn off the cold mains, run the baths and basins to empty the tank in the loft if you have one. Fill the kettle and some other containers so you have water to drink. Disasters are much easier to handle when there is tea to drink. Turn off valves in airing cupboard. Obviously get containers and towels to catch the water. Then investigate which pipes are busted so as to know what route you need to take to get them fixed.

I think you forgot to mention that not dealing with the heating and hot water tank could lead to an explosion ;)

Only drain the cold water taps. Make sure you don't use any hot water once the mains are off, or you'll drain the hot water tank and it will ... explode. Also turn the central heating down to low.

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Thanks for this. Currently at the in-laws and have now had a nice little worry...

Here's a useful site for historic temperature data, e.g. London

http://www.timeanddate.com/weather/uk/london/historic

Hopefully leaving the CH thermostat on 10°C will have been enough.

Didn't leave the loft hatch open, but the loft insulation is not up to current standards thankfully.

Fingers crossed...

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I think you forgot to mention that not dealing with the heating and hot water tank could lead to an explosion ;)

Only drain the cold water taps. Make sure you don't use any hot water once the mains are off, or you'll drain the hot water tank and it will ... explode. Also turn the central heating down to low.

No it wont. Saying things like that will make people worry. If turning the cold mains off doesnt stop the flow of water then its safe to assume that the pipes from the tank are leaking. Turn on all the cold taps to empty the tank in the loft (which wont be filling as the main is off) you might as well save the hot water in the cylinder.

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UK poor building standards. We insulate the loft rather than the roof and the result is frozen pipes and tanks in the loft.

Up until getting swine flu just over a week ago, I was

getting called out to 15 jobs a day for either frozen or burst pipes.

Despite being good for the bank balance most plumbers hate mending frozen/ burst pipe work.

Years of poor building practices, the use of cheap rockwool instead of high density insulated boards. Why does this country always cut corners.

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Alternatively skip all of the other steps and just call the landlord. Preferably after 9pm. A trouble shared is a trouble doubled and all of that.

I'm pretty sure one of our cast iron drain pipes has cracked due to the freeze. It was frozen for several days and had a fetching inch layer of ice on the outside as well as - presumably - the inside. Eventually managed to unfreeze it through liberal applications of a carpet steamer and kettles of boiling water.

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Word of advice. Always take up your loft insulation in winter to allow heat into the loft cavity and prevent your pipes from freezing. ;)

or just remove the insulation and board the roof with celutex foam board.

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[quote name='greencat' timestamp='1293443400' post='28339

I'm pretty sure one of our cast iron drain pipes has cracked due to the freeze. It was frozen for several days and had a fetching inch layer of ice on the outside as well as - presumably - the inside. Eventually managed to unfreeze it through liberal applications of a carpet steamer and kettles of boiling water.

applying heat to freezing cold cast iron will cause it to crack. Best to dissolve as much rock salt into a bucket of water then allow to cool. Empty this down the vent at the top of the stack.

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Here's an email I've received from the letting agency following a leaking waste pipe we had recently. Suppose the plumber's fee will come from our deposit :angry:

Dear Tenants,

Re: Frost damage

During the course of this spell of cold weather it is important to maintain adequate heating to protect the property against frost as stated in your lease.

Keep the Property at all times sufficiently well aired and warmed to avoid build-up of condensation and prevent mildew growth and to protect it from frost.

Your co-operation would be appreciated in this matter.

Yours sincerely

Lettings Department

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Here's an email I've received from the letting agency following a leaking waste pipe we had recently. Suppose the plumber's fee will come from our deposit :angry:

Brilliant, so it's all your fault for letting the pipes freeze.

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Here's an email I've received from the letting agency following a leaking waste pipe we had recently. Suppose the plumber's fee will come from our deposit :angry:

I presume they've kept their side of the bargain, and that the house/flat is adequately insulated. Double/triple glazing, cavity wall insulation, loft insulation etc.

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I have multiple burst pipes in the loft, well my landlord does.

But don't you want the security of being a mortgage owner! I feel sorry for you renters :lol:

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dry.gif

I presume they've kept their side of the bargain, and that the house/flat is adequately insulated. Double/triple glazing, cavity wall insulation, loft insulation etc.

Too much loft insulation is a major cause of burst pipes.

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No it wont. Saying things like that will make people worry. If turning the cold mains off doesnt stop the flow of water then its safe to assume that the pipes from the tank are leaking. Turn on all the cold taps to empty the tank in the loft (which wont be filling as the main is off) you might as well save the hot water in the cylinder.

Being aware of a water heaters potential to explode is surely the most important issue to be aware of.

Saying "no it won't" isn't going to help :blink:

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Too much loft insulation is a major cause of burst pipes.

You just need to make sure any pipes in the loft are properly lagged. I've also boxed in the cold water tank, insulated it heavily, but left the patch under the tank uninsulated (it's directly above the hot water tank). Leaving your loft under or un insulated is guaranteed to cost you money in gas and electric.

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I think you forgot to mention that not dealing with the heating and hot water tank could lead to an explosion ;)

Only drain the cold water taps. Make sure you don't use any hot water once the mains are off, or you'll drain the hot water tank and it will ... explode. Also turn the central heating down to low.

Water heaters can only explode under a very few circumstances.

1. They must be 'unvented' (which most aren't).

2. They must have simultaneous failure of 3 independent safety systems.

3. They must be full of water

4. The heating must be on.

5. The heating must be malfunctioning, by heating the water to boiling point.

Draining the water and/or shutting off the heat guarantees that there can be no explosion.

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You just need to make sure any pipes in the loft are properly lagged. I've also boxed in the cold water tank, insulated it heavily, but left the patch under the tank uninsulated (it's directly above the hot water tank). Leaving your loft under or un insulated is guaranteed to cost you money in gas and electric.

Of course it is, but you need some heat in there. Either it comes from the living area below or else you need a loft anti-frost heater.

Lagging alone won't stop cold water pipes freezing in prolonged sub zero temperatures.

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Water heaters can only explode under a very few circumstances.

1. They must be 'unvented' (which most aren't).

2. They must have simultaneous failure of 3 independent safety systems.

3. They must be full of water

4. The heating must be on.

5. The heating must be malfunctioning, by heating the water to boiling point.

Draining the water and/or shutting off the heat guarantees that there can be no explosion.

Thank you chumpus! Sense at last.

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Of course it is, but you need some heat in there. Either it comes from the living area below or else you need a loft anti-frost heater.

Lagging alone won't stop cold water pipes freezing in prolonged sub zero temperatures.

You can run pipes under the loft insulation as a solution. And any other exposed pipe runs should have at least 2cm of foam insulation like this from B&Q. You should have no problems with frozen pipes of the house is warm below (even if the loft is properly insulated). But drain them if the house is going to be left unoccupied.

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Brilliant, so it's all your fault for letting the pipes freeze.

Of course it is. Just because you are renting does not absolve you from common sense responsibility. Or is that just the general attitude of tenants. Do you think just because you pay a few quid for a pad, that you have no responsibility in this world. If you were in your own house you would try to stop it freezing up or pay the price.

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You just need to make sure any pipes in the loft are properly lagged. I've also boxed in the cold water tank, insulated it heavily, but left the patch under the tank uninsulated (it's directly above the hot water tank). Leaving your loft under or un insulated is guaranteed to cost you money in gas and electric.

Leave some taps running to keep the water on the move. Much harder to freeze moving water.

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Too much loft insulation is a major cause of burst pipes.

True. And i notice that a house over the road with a modern extension and insulation is melting the snow on the extension faster than the original house. Is this because the extra cavity wall insulation and double glazing are letting more heat get to the attic?

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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