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Mikhail Liebenstein

How To Buy British Or American.

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Having been listening to a lot US media, I am interested in what seems to be a big drive to buy American. I think in the UK we should look at doing similar for UK, but also US and European goods and reject Chinese products where possible. Certainly with things like clothes I am starting to get really fed up with the size inconsistencies on Chinese goods, basically there is no standardisation, and a lot of the rest of their products are shoddy because they have been made to be cheap.

So here is the key info: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2268090/posts

690-692 MADE IN CHINA

00 - 09 USA & CANADA

30 - 37 FRANCE

40 - 44 GERMANY

47 Taiwan

49 JAPAN

50 UK

Buy USA by watching for “0″ at the beginning of the number and UK by 50 at the front.

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This trick assumes that the barcode contents follow the rules. Yes, a correct EAN code shows the the country of origin in the fist two digits, the next few identify the company, the next few the product and the last is a check digit. However, the symbology can be used with any string of 12 numbers for an EAN13. It's not a law and the rules are flouted, at least they were by the retail company I once worked for. On their products the first two digits were something else, colour if recall correctly.

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"The first 2 (sometimes 3) digits, which are called the “flag”, indicate in what country the bar code was issued. This “flag” does not tell you, however, in what country the product was produced. "

Unfortunately not it seems.

For link see

My link

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you need to be more worried about being fleeced on sizes and prices here at home.

I was in tesco today and pointed out to wifey how they try to screw you because she is oblivious to it.

Just looking at pot noodles they show some with a price per 10g, per 100g and per 1 kilo. Three pricing levels for a selection of the same goods. Retailers over here have been fecking the mathmatically challenged for years, no need to look to chindia

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The first two or three digits of an EAN-13 barcode identify the country in which the manufacturer's identification code was assigned. They do not necessarily indicate the country in which the goods were manufactured. Many countries have EAN coding authorities which regulate the use of retail barcodes.

EAN•UCC Prefixes Country ISO country code

00 to 13 UCC (USA & Canada) us/ca

20 to 29 In-store numbers

30 to 37 GENCOD-EAN France fr

380 BCCI (Bulgaria) bg

383 EAN Slovenija si

385 EAN Croatia hr

387 EAN-BIH (Bosnia-Herzegovina) ba

400 to 440 CCG (Germany) de

45 + 49 Distribution Code Center DCC (Japan) jp

460 to 469 UNISCAN - EAN Russia (Russian Federation) ru

471 EAN Taiwan tw

474 EAN Estonia ee

475 EAN Latvia lv

476 EAN Azerbaijan az

477 EAN Lithuania lt

478 EAN Uzbekistan uz

479 EAN Sri Lanka lk

480 PANC (Philippines) ph

481 EAN Belarus by

482 EAN Ukraine ua

484 EAN Moldova md

485 EAN Armenia am

486 EAN Georgia ge

487 EAN Kazakhstan kz

489 HKANA (Hong-Kong) hk

50 e.centre gb

520 EAN HELLAS (Greece) gr

528 EAN Lebanon lb

529 EAN Cyprus cy

531 EAN-MAC (FYR Macedonia) mk

535 EAN Malta mt

539 EAN Ireland ie

54 EAN Belgium.Luxembourg be/lu

560 CODIPOR (Portugal) pt

569 EAN Iceland is

57 EAN Danmark dk

590 EAN Poland pl

594 EAN Romania ro

599 EAN Hungary hu

600 - 601 EAN South Africa za

608 EAN Bahrain

bh 048

609 EAN Mauritius mu

611 EAN Maroc (Morocco) ma

613 EAN Algerie (Algeria) dz

616 EAN Kenya ke

619 Tunicode (Tunisia) tn

621 EAN Syria sy

622 EAN Egypt eg

624 EAN Libya ly

625 EAN Jordan jo

626 EAN Iran ir

627 EAN Kuwait kw

628 EAN Saudi Arabia sa

629 EAN Emirates ae

64 EAN Finland fi

690 - 695 Article Numbering Centre of China - ANCC cn

70 EAN Norge (Norway) no

729 Israeli Bar Code Association - EAN Israel il

73 EAN Sweden se

740 EAN Guatemala gt

741 EAN El Salvador sv

742 EAN Honduras hn

743 EAN Nicaragua ni

744 EAN Costa Rica cr

745 EAN Panama pa

746 EAN Republica Dominicana do

750 AMECE (Mexico) mx

759 EAN Venezuela ve

76 EAN Switzerland ch

770 IAC (Colombia) co

773 EAN Uruguay uy

775 EAN Peru pe

777 EAN Bolivia bo

779 CODIGO - EAN Argentina ar

780 EAN Chile cl

784 EAN Paraguay py

786 ECOP (Ecuador) ec

789 - 790 EAN Brasil br

80 to 83 INDICOD (Italy) it

84 AECOC (Spain) es

850 Camera de Comercio de la Republica de Cuba cu

858 EAN Slovakia sk

859 EAN Czech cz

860 EAN YU (Yugoslavia) yu

867 EAN DPR Korea (North Korea) kp

869 UCCET (Turkey) tr

87 EAN Nederland nl

880 EAN Korea (South Korea) kr

885 EAN Thailand th

888 SANC (Singapore) sg

890 EAN India in

893 EAN Vietnam vn

899 EAN Indonesia id

90 - 91 EAN Austria at

93 EAN Australia au

94 EAN New Zealand nz

955 EAN Malaysia my

958 EAN Macau mo

977 Periodicals (ISSN)

978 - 979 Books (ISBN)

980 Refund receipts

981 - 982 Common currency coupons

99 Coupons

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The first two or three digits of an EAN-13 barcode identify the country in which the manufacturer's identification code was assigned. They do not necessarily indicate the country in which the goods were manufactured. Many countries have EAN coding authorities which regulate the use of retail barcodes.

EAN•UCC Prefixes Country ISO country code

00 to 13 UCC (USA & Canada) us/ca

20 to 29 In-store numbers

30 to 37 GENCOD-EAN France fr

380 BCCI (Bulgaria) bg

383 EAN Slovenija si

385 EAN Croatia hr

387 EAN-BIH (Bosnia-Herzegovina) ba

400 to 440 CCG (Germany) de

45 + 49 Distribution Code Center DCC (Japan) jp

460 to 469 UNISCAN - EAN Russia (Russian Federation) ru

471 EAN Taiwan tw

474 EAN Estonia ee

475 EAN Latvia lv

476 EAN Azerbaijan az

477 EAN Lithuania lt

478 EAN Uzbekistan uz

479 EAN Sri Lanka lk

480 PANC (Philippines) ph

481 EAN Belarus by

482 EAN Ukraine ua

484 EAN Moldova md

485 EAN Armenia am

486 EAN Georgia ge

487 EAN Kazakhstan kz

489 HKANA (Hong-Kong) hk

50 e.centre gb

520 EAN HELLAS (Greece) gr

528 EAN Lebanon lb

529 EAN Cyprus cy

531 EAN-MAC (FYR Macedonia) mk

535 EAN Malta mt

539 EAN Ireland ie

54 EAN Belgium.Luxembourg be/lu

560 CODIPOR (Portugal) pt

569 EAN Iceland is

57 EAN Danmark dk

590 EAN Poland pl

594 EAN Romania ro

599 EAN Hungary hu

600 - 601 EAN South Africa za

608 EAN Bahrain

bh 048

609 EAN Mauritius mu

611 EAN Maroc (Morocco) ma

613 EAN Algerie (Algeria) dz

616 EAN Kenya ke

619 Tunicode (Tunisia) tn

621 EAN Syria sy

622 EAN Egypt eg

624 EAN Libya ly

625 EAN Jordan jo

626 EAN Iran ir

627 EAN Kuwait kw

628 EAN Saudi Arabia sa

629 EAN Emirates ae

64 EAN Finland fi

690 - 695 Article Numbering Centre of China - ANCC cn

70 EAN Norge (Norway) no

729 Israeli Bar Code Association - EAN Israel il

73 EAN Sweden se

740 EAN Guatemala gt

741 EAN El Salvador sv

742 EAN Honduras hn

743 EAN Nicaragua ni

744 EAN Costa Rica cr

745 EAN Panama pa

746 EAN Republica Dominicana do

750 AMECE (Mexico) mx

759 EAN Venezuela ve

76 EAN Switzerland ch

770 IAC (Colombia) co

773 EAN Uruguay uy

775 EAN Peru pe

777 EAN Bolivia bo

779 CODIGO - EAN Argentina ar

780 EAN Chile cl

784 EAN Paraguay py

786 ECOP (Ecuador) ec

789 - 790 EAN Brasil br

80 to 83 INDICOD (Italy) it

84 AECOC (Spain) es

850 Camera de Comercio de la Republica de Cuba cu

858 EAN Slovakia sk

859 EAN Czech cz

860 EAN YU (Yugoslavia) yu

867 EAN DPR Korea (North Korea) kp

869 UCCET (Turkey) tr

87 EAN Nederland nl

880 EAN Korea (South Korea) kr

885 EAN Thailand th

888 SANC (Singapore) sg

890 EAN India in

893 EAN Vietnam vn

899 EAN Indonesia id

90 - 91 EAN Austria at

93 EAN Australia au

94 EAN New Zealand nz

955 EAN Malaysia my

958 EAN Macau mo

977 Periodicals (ISSN)

978 - 979 Books (ISBN)

980 Refund receipts

981 - 982 Common currency coupons

99 Coupons

where is the code for israel? how am I to boycott those big nosed house builders without a code?

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where is the code for israel? how am I to boycott those big nosed house builders without a code?

Not very often you see stuff made is Israel.

Only things i can think of that i've seen around here are stanley plastic toolboxes , dates (the dried edible fruit) and a small number of medicines.

Edited by Ruffneck

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This won't work for private label which a very large amount of products and not always obviously.

A more general rule would be if it's not food* assume it's not UK made.

*Excluding things like Christmas/Halloween confectionary which an increasing amount is Chinese and I personally would not consume.

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Campaigns like this have been tried before and it's too little too late, plus I haven't got time to check all this sh1t every time I buy something. You basically have protectionism, or free and fair global trade combined with small governments, not some half way deficit-addicted-big-government-subsidies-unfair-trade-cluster-f4ck house, like we currently have.

Bottom line is I buy what I need and buy the best product based on my personal tastes and my own assessment of quality/value for money, be it British, Chinese, German etc.

Come on, in all honesty do you want to go back to driving Austin Maestro's? (quite topical, cos I saw one of the old rust buckets today, couldn't believe there was still one that functioned! :lol: ).

Edited by General Congreve

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unfortunately this is not foolproof

The barcodes we put on our products are all in a series issued to us by GS1, never have we been asked to say where the products that the barcodes are going onto were made....

We sell stuff made in China, stuff made in Taiwan, stuff made in the EU and stuff made in the UK and the barcodes will be the same except the last few digits, which are essentially serial

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think in the UK we should look at doing similar for UK, but also US and European goods and reject Chinese products where possible.

As someone who manufactures clothes in China i can help you here. No need to look at the barcode. If you want to make sure you are buying British simply look at the price on the ticket. If its of equal quality to Chinese stuff but costs 3x as much then you can safely assume it was made in Britain. If you are prepared to pay the extra then more power to you. Sadly not many people do and until people decide that after paying their insane UK rent and tax they also want to pay manufacturers crazy UK rents and tax as well as the stores crazy UK rents and tax - we'll still be manufacturing in China.

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Not very often you see stuff made is Israel.

Only things i can think of that i've seen around here are stanley plastic toolboxes , dates (the dried edible fruit) and a small number of medicines.

indeed, it makes you wonder how they buy all those DU encased tanks, the fleets of latest F16s, the combat ships, the high tech radar, the latest soldiery and numerous types of probably illegal ordnance.

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Having been listening to a lot US media, I am interested in what seems to be a big drive to buy American. I think in the UK we should look at doing similar for UK, but also US and European goods and reject Chinese products where possible. Certainly with things like clothes I am starting to get really fed up with the size inconsistencies on Chinese goods, basically there is no standardisation, and a lot of the rest of their products are shoddy because they have been made to be cheap.

That looks totally inconsistent to me. I'm old enough to remember a time before mass chinese imports, and there certainly wasn't standardisation in clothes sizes back then either.

For myself I'll continue to choose clothes on criteria of comfort, practicality (e.g. good pockets), durability (so far as I can assess it) and price. Not barcode or place of origin. I've even relaxed the personal boycott on US stuff since Bush went.

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indeed, it makes you wonder how they buy all those DU encased tanks, the fleets of latest F16s, the combat ships, the high tech radar, the latest soldiery and numerous types of probably illegal ordnance.

I was told by an ex UN peacekeeper that they are gifted to the israeli's by the american taxpayers. Who are totally ignorant of it. But then ignorance is a very strong suite 'over there'. :rolleyes:

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I was told by an ex UN peacekeeper that they are gifted to the israeli's by the american taxpayers. Who are totally ignorant of it. But then ignorance is a very strong suite 'over there'. :rolleyes:

shocked!

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Campaigns like this have been tried before and it's too little too late, plus I haven't got time to check all this sh1t every time I buy something. You basically have protectionism, or free and fair global trade combined with small governments, not some half way deficit-addicted-big-government-subsidies-unfair-trade-cluster-f4ck house, like we currently have.

Bottom line is I buy what I need and buy the best product based on my personal tastes and my own assessment of quality/value for money, be it British, Chinese, German etc.

Come on, in all honesty do you want to go back to driving Austin Maestro's? (quite topical, cos I saw one of the old rust buckets today, couldn't believe there was still one that functioned! :lol: ).

Yap.. I will buy whichever that offers the best price/value trade off.

Even British made stuffs probably contains lots of 'foreign' components anyway.

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As someone who manufactures clothes in China i can help you here. No need to look at the barcode. If you want to make sure you are buying British simply look at the price on the ticket. If its of equal quality to Chinese stuff but costs 3x as much then you can safely assume it was made in Britain. If you are prepared to pay the extra then more power to you. Sadly not many people do and until people decide that after paying their insane UK rent and tax they also want to pay manufacturers crazy UK rents and tax as well as the stores crazy UK rents and tax - we'll still be manufacturing in China.

bulldust

I've been picking up newly made American made cotton shirts for $8US , which in my mind is a bargain.

I've seen many first world manufacturing go offshore with clothing and the 'known' brands keep the same high price point.For example saw a Ralph Lauren polo shirt for $200 USD equivalent in a department store - checked the label - Made in China.

You telling me they can't make a t-shirt in an Italian , UK , US etc factory for wholesale $100-130 USD? You are dreaming , with alot of the stuff it's just pure greed , they were making big profits but they wanted even bigger ones.

Also on the subject Levis makes the 501 jean in Columbia , i have heard the fabric quality has gone down the shitter in regards to thickness and also shrinkage issues when washed - you could easily get a superior quality American made jean (EG Texas Jeans co) for close to half the price.

Edited by Ruffneck

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bulldust

I've been picking up newly made American made cotton shirts for $8US , which in my mind is a bargain.

I've seen many first world manufacturing go offshore with clothing and the 'known' brands keep the same high price point.For example saw a Ralph Lauren polo shirt for $200 USD equivalent in a department store - checked the label - Made in China.

You telling me they can't make a t-shirt in an Italian , UK , US etc factory for wholesale $100-130 USD? You are dreaming , with alot of the stuff it's just pure greed , they were making big profits but they wanted even bigger ones.

Also on the subject Levis makes the 501 jean in Columbia , i have heard the fabric quality has gone down the shitter in regards to thickness and also shrinkage issues when washed - you could easily get a superior quality American made jean (EG Texas Jeans co) for close to half the price.

I don't know about the American domestic market.

Ralph Lauren polo shirt in the UK is £85. That needs to get in front of a stores buyer for £34 at the maximum. Ralf Lauren then need to cover their costs and make their margin so the ex factory price needs to be £13.60. The factory that makes this needs to be able to make this shirt (skilled labour and decent quality materials) and also make their margins for £13.60. Given the high cost of rent, taxes and also minimum wage in the UK i'm not sure it would be possible. Bear in mind that you'd need to import the materials so costs such as shipping / customs clearance would need to be built into the price regardless of where the manufacturing took place.

I can only tell you what i know. We recently had to have washing instructions sown into some garments over here and (admittedly we didnt have time to shop around) it cost almost the same amount as having the entire garment stitched together over in China.

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Does it take into account packed in uk?

No. When I worked for an outfit which imported a lot of gear our barcodes were 50 + the code for the company + the code we assigned to the item. Products could be made anywhere,

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Having been listening to a lot US media, I am interested in what seems to be a big drive to buy American. I think in the UK we should look at doing similar for UK, but also US and European goods and reject Chinese products where possible.

(...)

I don't know your intentions, but if it is ethics, you are making a mistake. Not even the international labour unions advise boycotts. Actually the ethical thing to do is always to buy from the poorest countries. Also the UN ILO does not recommend boycotts. Really, please do some serious research before advocating boycotts or protectionism. You are doing much more harm than good. And please think before replying to this post. Take your time. My intentions are good, honestly.

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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I don't know your intentions, but if it is ethics, you are making a mistake. Not even the international labour unions advise boycotts. Actually the ethical thing to do is always to buy from the poorest countries. Also the UN ILO does not recommend boycotts. Really, please do some serious research before advocating boycotts or protectionism. You are doing much more harm than good. And please think before replying to this post. Take your time. My intentions are good, honestly.

.

Buying from these slave labour countries doesn't help the workers there anywhere as much as it helps the corporates and CEOs that outsourced the work there in the first place.

Outsourced slavery = more money for the CEOs , less money to the workers.To those who say it's good to help these poor people out in 3rd world countries , Detroit could use some of those jobs back.50% unemployment and counting.Glasgow could use some of those jobs back.

You people have been brainwashed by the mass media over this issue i'm afraid.Look at the tag , if it says made in a sweatshop country put it back on the shelves and buy online.More choice , better pricing.

Edited by Ruffneck

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Buying from these slave labour countries doesn't help the workers there anywhere as much as it helps the corporates and CEOs that outsourced the work there in the first place.

Outsourced slavery = more money for the CEOs , less money to the workers.To those who say it's good to help these poor people out in 3rd world countries , Detroit could use some of those jobs back.50% unemployment and counting.Glasgow could use some of those jobs back.

You people have been brainwashed by the mass media over this issue i'm afraid.Look at the tag , if it says made in a sweatshop country put it back on the shelves and buy online.More choice , better pricing.

Even the international labour unions do not agree with you. Research what the International Labour Organisation thinks about protectionism.

Your argument has been used since the industrial revolution, first by the English against "cheap" USA, German and French competition, or after the 2nd world war by Americans against "cheap" Japanese imports. Then against "cheap" "Asian Tigers", etc.

Development has been spreading for a couple of centuries, and that is a very positive thing.

China is developing already, its internal market is growing, and salaries are going up. Their trade surplus is only about 5% of their GDP. Let them grow. They are producing more. Global production is increasing. It is not a zero sum game. It is not "at our cost".

But you don't have to believe me. Do research what the International Labour Organisation thinks about protectionism. It would be bad for all, UK workers included.

_______________

Besides, it is not poverty ("slavery") that is developing China. India is much poorer and has a trade deficit. Same for sub-Saharan Africa, or Central Asia. On the other hand many rich countries have surpluses like Germany, Netherlands and Japan. China is just getting its act together in this past decade (finally!), including re. infrastructure, education, market economy, etc.

Look at the trade balances, in the table below.

Latest 12 months, in US$ billions.

Biggest surpluses: Germany 208.2; China 182.9; Japan 86.8 (excluding oil/gas exporters)

Biggest deficits USA -621.4; Britain -140.8; India -121.8

http://www.economist.com/node/17312143?story_id=17312143

20101023_INT400.gif

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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