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Christmas Getaway: Train Companies Cancel Up To 25Pc Of Services

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/8221340/Christmas-getaway-train-companies-cancel-up-to-25pc-of-services.html

Passengers face long waits on freezing platforms as they head home for the Christmas break because train companies are opting to cancel services rather than try to run them in the cold weather.

Some companies are only running 75 per cent of their usual services on a day when millions of Britons are travelling to join their families, the Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) has admitted.

The tactics will anger commuters who have had to scrap Christmas travel plans this week because their train has been cancelled or have had nightmare commutes to and from work.

Edward Welsh, of (ATOC), said up to a quarter of services in some areas of Britain will not run today because of the snow and ice.

He added that the move may sound counterintuitive but it insisted it was helping passengers get to their destinations.

"What the industry has been trying to do is concentrating on people getting through, he said. That has impacted on punctuality and we apologise for that.

"We are trying to ensure that services are reliable so sometimes we have to reduce the number of services to increase the reliability of those services.

"Unfortunately it means some trains are overcrowded and it does mean cancellations, and we apologise for that, but trains have been getting through."

Genius.

We live in the greatest banana republic of them all.

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The effect of performance statistics - cancelled trains score higher than late trains.rolleyes.gif

I don't know - it kind of makes some sense to me - they can remove the dodgier trains from the schedule, there is more slack between trains to deice points/tracks whatever, and more time to deal with any incidents that there are. Presumably if a train gets stuck and others stop on the track behind it then they will start to have problems with freezing over and whatever as well.

What this really tells us I think is that our network is run too close to maximum capacity on a general basis. It is always easier to deal with problems if there is some slack in the system, and so they have given themselves the slack, whilst presumably hoping that more crowded trains will carry the passengers. At the very least the trains will be heavy and less likely to have slippage problems! In the longer term though this bad weather has shown left right and centre that too many industries/walks of life/whatever, operate too close to the edge on a regular basis.

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In the longer term though this bad weather has shown left right and centre that too many industries/walks of life/whatever, operate too close to the edge on a regular basis.

Is that done to maximise profits? Rather than wasting resources on a balance sheet?

Of course this policy falls down when the SHTF.

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Is that done to maximise profits? Rather than wasting resources on a balance sheet?

That would be my guess.

Of course this policy falls down when the SHTF.

Indeed. And perhaps longer term too - if you piss your customers off too often they will find an alternative.

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Yes they could fly.

Or they could drive. :ph34r:

Well, I was speaking more generally than just the trains. But even there there are alternatives. Expansion of the intercity bus routes perhaps.

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Our trains here in the south-east are particularly badly affected by snow and ice because they collect their current from a third rail rather than an overhead catenary which makes it susceptible to this weather as well as electrocuting several incautious teenagers every year... I very much doubt a railway system would be allowed to build a third rail system nowadays.

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Our trains here in the south-east are particularly badly affected by snow and ice because they collect their current from a third rail rather than an overhead catenary which makes it susceptible to this weather as well as electrocuting several incautious teenagers every year... I very much doubt a railway system would be allowed to build a third rail system nowadays.

My understanding is that it's not allowed, but extension of existing systems is (basically the SE and Merseyside). I don't know if that includes underground systems.

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I don't know - it kind of makes some sense to me - they can remove the dodgier trains from the schedule, there is more slack between trains to deice points/tracks whatever, and more time to deal with any incidents that there are. Presumably if a train gets stuck and others stop on the track behind it then they will start to have problems with freezing over and whatever as well.

What this really tells us I think is that our network is run too close to maximum capacity on a general basis. It is always easier to deal with problems if there is some slack in the system, and so they have given themselves the slack, whilst presumably hoping that more crowded trains will carry the passengers. At the very least the trains will be heavy and less likely to have slippage problems! In the longer term though this bad weather has shown left right and centre that too many industries/walks of life/whatever, operate too close to the edge on a regular basis.

When the cult of efficiency trumps common sense.

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Is that done to maximise profits? Rather than wasting resources on a balance sheet?

Of course this policy falls down when the SHTF.

Ahhh yes the good 'ol

Snow hit the fan excuses

The wrong type wiped out Christmas Eurostar services t'other year as it entered the air intakes!

I really don't know why people bother to travel at this time of year.

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I don't know - it kind of makes some sense to me - they can remove the dodgier trains from the schedule, there is more slack between trains to deice points/tracks whatever, and more time to deal with any incidents that there are. Presumably if a train gets stuck and others stop on the track behind it then they will start to have problems with freezing over and whatever as well.

What this really tells us I think is that our network is run too close to maximum capacity on a general basis. It is always easier to deal with problems if there is some slack in the system, and so they have given themselves the slack, whilst presumably hoping that more crowded trains will carry the passengers. At the very least the trains will be heavy and less likely to have slippage problems! In the longer term though this bad weather has shown left right and centre that too many industries/walks of life/whatever, operate too close to the edge on a regular basis.

Rail-roading

- the parallel rail 'lin'-ed universe forced with rods of IRON fastened down over the SLEEPERS in the miDDle!

Freighter/Frater!

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On a more positive note - NO trains have been cancelled on the Manchester to oldham line due to leaves on the line.

Every autumn train service has been cut in half because it's better to cut the number of trains than have them all late...

This is because they've ripped up the lines and stations and are bringing trams to oldham.

They reckon trams will make it up the slope leaves or no leaves...

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On a more positive note - NO trains have been cancelled on the Manchester to oldham line due to leaves on the line.

Every autumn train service has been cut in half because it's better to cut the number of trains than have them all late...

This is because they've ripped up the lines and stations and are bringing trams to oldham.

They reckon trams will make it up the slope leaves or no leaves...

On a less positive note, Northern Rail cancelled a pile of Trans Pennine Express rains to Leeds this afternoon, so I couldn't get out to my Mum's. However, they left them all showing as 'on time' on the board, forcing passengers to stand on a freezing platform, in the vain hope that a train might show up. They eventually sent a 2 carriage train for about 1 zillion people, which terminated at Rochdale :angry:

Then it turned out there were no cabs to take us any further, as many of the local cabbies were at the mosque due to it being Friday (according to Sikh bloke in taxi queue).

Nearly 2 1/2 hours for a journey which should take 22 minutes from Victoria. Useless feckers.

Merry Christmas HPC-ers. God Bless Us, Every One!

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Our trains here in the south-east are particularly badly affected by snow and ice because they collect their current from a third rail rather than an overhead catenary which makes it susceptible to this weather as well as electrocuting several incautious teenagers every year...

When I was in high school one of the chav elements decided that it would be fun to drop an iron bar across some electrified rails on the local suburban line in order to create a short circuit, and thus chaos. Unfortunately, his disinclination to pay attention in physics lessons (or any lessons, for that matter) resulted in him attempting this prank in the pouring rain, and getting a taste of what

must have felt like. In the aftermath of that we were all frogmarched into the school hall and shown a particularly grisly educational film about the inadvisability of playing on railway lines, complete with shots of decapitated heads, electrocuted corpses and blood-splattered sleepers. After one of the Kentucky fried teenagers met his maker in glorious Technicolor, I remember someone in the row behind me commenting that it served him right for wearing [insert unfashionable brand of trainers here]. That remark earned him a week's suspension.

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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