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Caribbean Beauty

53 Year Old Travel Company Dies

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This ancient travel business with 4 branches has gone to its final place in the sun, having traded since long before both our PM and leader of the opposition were born, withstanding several recessions along the way. But those of us in the travel industry know that this is not like any prior tough trading period - since such firms with actual shops and real humans working in them are also battling against the power of the internet direct-booking revolution. Luckily I am on the winning side of the internet battle, but it is still upsetting to think of the poor sods losing their income just before xmas:

Jobs lost as Davis World Travel ceases tradingDec 16, 2010 10:29

Independent Davis World Travel has shut its four branches with the loss of 20 jobs after going into liquidation after 53 years of trading.

The Hampshire-based agency ceased trading yesterday with administrator Begbies Traynor saying the company had become "another victim of the recession".

The jobs have gone at its outlets in Lee-on-Solent, Gosport, Fareham and Portchester and a corporate travel centre also in Fareham.

Formed in 1957, Davis World Travel was a member of Advanrage and had a turnover of around £5-6 million generated through bookings for traditional package holidays as well as city breaks and cruises.

Begbies Traynor has set up a helpline for information other than specific advice surrounding travel plans at 023 8038 2702. Other enquiries should be directed to davisworldtravel@begbies-traynor.com.

Antony Fanshawe, of the Southampton office of Begbies Traynor, said: “Despite its long-standing pedigree, this company has been a victim of a sea change in the way we book holidays.

“Add to this the events of the last year, the recession, volcanic ash, airline strikes and the impending threat of increased air taxes and the result has been devastating for this business. The directors decided they had no option but to place it into liquidation.

“This is another business which has fallen prey to global events since the beginning of the recession.

“As well as the ramifications this liquidation has for holidaymakers, we have also to remember that 20 people have lost their livelihoods – it’s always sad to see job losses but it’s especially difficult at this time of year.”

Abta said any retail claims arising from the failure of Davis World Travel will be handled by its claims department.

"If any principals dealt with this company on the CAPS payment system they should contact Advantage Travel Centres Ltd in the first instance," Abta said.

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My girlfriend works for a subsidiary of Thomas Cook, they are laying people off left right and centre, they are discounting like mad, having now started a price war no one can afford with their competitors and yet are still missing their minimum sales targets by 33% this year.

There is going to be a blood bath in the travel industry . Looking forward to some bargain holiday deals in the meantime though. :D

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My girlfriend works for a subsidiary of Thomas Cook, they are laying people off left right and centre, they are discounting like mad, having now started a price war no one can afford with their competitors and yet are still missing their minimum sales targets by 33% this year.

There is going to be a blood bath in the travel industry . Looking forward to some bargain holiday deals in the meantime though. :D

Yes, both Thomas Cook and Tui are suffering too, the 2 big boys. And the German version of APD will surely damage TUI just as the UK APD is damaging the UK market.

One day soon we will all have to make our own "dynamic packages" using the power of the web - not just the present growing band who never use High Street agents at present, but everyone. Who will need any high street agent then?

Just a few years away or less is the ongoing development of website robotic assistants improving some more, with better voice recognition and levels of "intelligence" which will render thick chavette teen-agents* - who have often never left their home town - totally outclassed in the holiday advice stakes, and enabling folks to engage in travel counselling and holiday planning from the comfort of their own home. Then all agents will go the way of off licenses. Doomed.

*excludes your girlfriend!

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the everlasting search for low prices mean that service is the item many people will do without.

box shifting leads to 0 service and a whole raft of jobs to go.

the travel business cant offer a service as well as an ultra cheap deal.

Course, if deflation was allowed to take place, then the fact that less money buys more would allow service to remain a part of the price. but while inflation is rampant, then falling price allows less margin and therefore less jobs.

the fallacy with inflation paying everything off is illustrated perfectly here...it might allow a few debtors to get away with some stress, but it impoverishes the nation.

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My girlfriend works for a subsidiary of Thomas Cook, they are laying people off left right and centre, they are discounting like mad, having now started a price war no one can afford with their competitors and yet are still missing their minimum sales targets by 33% this year.

There is going to be a blood bath in the travel industry . Looking forward to some bargain holiday deals in the meantime though. :D

Best wishes to her, her job is simply going the same way mine went. Every company asks the same question- "Can we reduce our costs by automating it or offshoring it?"

Travel agents are doomed because if I want a holiday I can find one on the net, I can see photos of the hotel, read reviews by previous guests, find out everything I need to know and then book it without even going outside into the December rain and snow. If ever there was an example of an industry challenged by technology it is travel agency.

At a high street travel agents they probably need £10,000 worth of sales a month just to pay staff, rent, business rates, energy bills etc... I can get a week in Spain, flights and hotel next month for £95 online.

The only silver lining is that estate agents will be the next to go this way.

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I don't know what the answer is.

I was a continental truck driver for 25 years and I used to take stuff all over Europe and used to earn between £500 and £700 a week for doing it, depending how long I was away.

Go to Dover tonight and you will see a Bulgarian taking a load from Coventry to Milan and earning £150 a week, enduring near slave-like working conditions. We cannot compete with them, even if we worked for the minimum wage, because they are based in eastern Europe and pay eastern European pay rates and have commensurate operating expenses.

My ex-boss, who I keep in touch with, quoted a return trip to Italy last week for £3,500. Back in 1986 the rate would have been £2,400 but he was under-quoted by £1,400, so they can do it for £300 less than we were doing it for 25 years ago.

It's just the way it is, everybody, myself included, wants things cheaper. Nobody who goes shopping insists on only buying products delivered by British truck drivers, or would be prepared to pay a premium for it

For me, I don't care, I stashed enough away to see me through the 15 years of life remaining to me and I had a life of travelling at somebody else's expense. travel always having been my greatest love. I've been to some fantastic places with work.

It's my kids I feel sorry for, they are 12 and I simply cannot begin to imagine what they will be able to do for a living in six, seven, ten years time.

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I stashed enough away to see me through the 15 years of life remaining to me.

jesus harry - how have you worked that one out? :unsure:

It's my kids I feel sorry for, they are 12 and I simply cannot begin to imagine what they will be able to do for a living in six, seven, ten years time.

i know exactly what you mean - one woman at work who went to a decent university (unlike mine :lol: ) thinks her kids will be going to the same sort of place.

i keep my mouth shut. :ph34r:

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Here's a just for fun post.

People are still going on holiday, its just how they book. Sure get online. But LAND is finite. Theres only one Barbados, and people still go to it and spend money there. They should have bought Barbados, that'll give two fingers upto the competition, who can't now buy Barbados.

Rockerfeller said "competition is a sin".

Edited by Money Spinner

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I don't know what the answer is.

I was a continental truck driver for 25 years and I used to take stuff all over Europe and used to earn between £500 and £700 a week for doing it, depending how long I was away.

Go to Dover tonight and you will see a Bulgarian taking a load from Coventry to Milan and earning £150 a week, enduring near slave-like working conditions. We cannot compete with them, even if we worked for the minimum wage, because they are based in eastern Europe and pay eastern European pay rates and have commensurate operating expenses.

My ex-boss, who I keep in touch with, quoted a return trip to Italy last week for £3,500. Back in 1986 the rate would have been £2,400 but he was under-quoted by £1,400, so they can do it for £300 less than we were doing it for 25 years ago.

It's just the way it is, everybody, myself included, wants things cheaper. Nobody who goes shopping insists on only buying products delivered by British truck drivers, or would be prepared to pay a premium for it

For me, I don't care, I stashed enough away to see me through the 15 years of life remaining to me and I had a life of travelling at somebody else's expense. travel always having been my greatest love. I've been to some fantastic places with work.

It's my kids I feel sorry for, they are 12 and I simply cannot begin to imagine what they will be able to do for a living in six, seven, ten years time.

indeed. deflation, or the rebalancing of the economy is truly something we must avoid...cant have British workers being able to compete and firms growing, we MUST keep bankers in jobs and public sector feather bedded.

its the only way forward for the peoples republic of the UK....the Capitalist enemies of the US of Bulgchindia are decadent in their greed.

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And the German version of APD will surely damage TUI just as the UK APD is damaging the UK market.

It's got to be. When I first started making regular Teesside-Alaska filghts in 2006, the going rate was £350ish return. It's now around double that, with a £100 of that rise having happened over the last year. Looking at the breakdown of that, it's clear to see that tax is the main reason for the rise. The taxes and charges on a 2006 ticket were £140ish. On the ticket I've just bought, the tax and charge component is £320. Even though around two thirds of my flights are on business (or at least they include business, meaning that I don't pay for them), I'm very much noticing the ones I buy myself. Given that I wouldn't get to see my fiancée if I didn't go this is effectively a non-discretionary spend for me, but that level of taxation would be enough to deter me from taking a long-haul holiday, especially if it's more than just me travelling. For a family of four, that would be £1,300 on taxes and charges alone.

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It's got to be. When I first started making regular Teesside-Alaska filghts in 2006, the going rate was £350ish return. It's now around double that, with a £100 of that rise having happened over the last year. Looking at the breakdown of that, it's clear to see that tax is the main reason for the rise. The taxes and charges on a 2006 ticket were £140ish. On the ticket I've just bought, the tax and charge component is £320. Even though around two thirds of my flights are on business (or at least they include business, meaning that I don't pay for them), I'm very much noticing the ones I buy myself. Given that I wouldn't get to see my fiancée if I didn't go this is effectively a non-discretionary spend for me, but that level of taxation would be enough to deter me from taking a long-haul holiday, especially if it's more than just me travelling. For a family of four, that would be £1,300 on taxes and charges alone.

The boom is over. Looks like it's the end of the cheap travel era as well. I went to FL, USA in 2006, cost me about £450. Flight in 2010 was quoted at £800. We holidayed nearer to home..... B)

All we need is oil to spike to $130 by next summer and it's game over for many in the trade.

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It's got to be. When I first started making regular Teesside-Alaska filghts in 2006, the going rate was £350ish return. It's now around double that, with a £100 of that rise having happened over the last year. Looking at the breakdown of that, it's clear to see that tax is the main reason for the rise. The taxes and charges on a 2006 ticket were £140ish. On the ticket I've just bought, the tax and charge component is £320. Even though around two thirds of my flights are on business (or at least they include business, meaning that I don't pay for them), I'm very much noticing the ones I buy myself. Given that I wouldn't get to see my fiancée if I didn't go this is effectively a non-discretionary spend for me, but that level of taxation would be enough to deter me from taking a long-haul holiday, especially if it's more than just me travelling. For a family of four, that would be £1,300 on taxes and charges alone.

all well and good, but take heart, and be reassured that that tax is going 100% towards measures to slow Global warming.

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It's got to be. When I first started making regular Teesside-Alaska filghts in 2006, the going rate was £350ish return. It's now around double that, with a £100 of that rise having happened over the last year. Looking at the breakdown of that, it's clear to see that tax is the main reason for the rise. The taxes and charges on a 2006 ticket were £140ish. On the ticket I've just bought, the tax and charge component is £320. Even though around two thirds of my flights are on business (or at least they include business, meaning that I don't pay for them), I'm very much noticing the ones I buy myself. Given that I wouldn't get to see my fiancée if I didn't go this is effectively a non-discretionary spend for me, but that level of taxation would be enough to deter me from taking a long-haul holiday, especially if it's more than just me travelling. For a family of four, that would be £1,300 on taxes and charges alone.

Hi AB - so your fiancee is in Alaska? That makes her either a pretty Grizzly bear, or one of the Palin ladies? Evereyone else there is a hairy assed oil rigger or fisherman. We have a right to know.

PS - yes it is crazy, long haul flights seem to have doubled in price in less than 5 years - at the same time incomes and MEWing have collapsed. When you combine that with fear of job losses and iced up grounded planes and trains destroying holiday plans, I cannot see any hope or light at the end of the tunnel. I wish I could - our bookings are way down again, having recovered in the snow blast of this year (Jan-Feb). Looks like we are not going to see another snow stimulus of Caribbean sales this season.

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Hi AB - so your fiancee is in Alaska? That makes her either a pretty Grizzly bear, or one of the Palin ladies? Evereyone else there is a hairy assed oil rigger or fisherman. We have a right to know.

PS - yes it is crazy, long haul flights seem to have doubled in price in less than 5 years - at the same time incomes and MEWing have collapsed. When you combine that with fear of job losses and iced up grounded planes and trains destroying holiday plans, I cannot see any hope or light at the end of the tunnel. I wish I could - our bookings are way down again, having recovered in the snow blast of this year (Jan-Feb). Looks like we are not going to see another snow stimulus of Caribbean sales this season.

Australia and NZ still about 900-1100 return, same as we paid in 2006...just waiting for the refund on the BA fuel surcharge scam.

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Australia and NZ still about 900-1100 return, same as we paid in 2006...just waiting for the refund on the BA fuel surcharge scam.

That would be A380 economies of scale on the mega longhaul routes- even the airlines which are still sending Jumbos and cripple 7s to australasia have had their ticket prices downgraded by the new super size planes offering cheaper fares.

Let us hope these beasts start flying transatlantic and to the Caribbean, to impact on fares - but doubtful for the latter, since their airports/runways are not big enough.

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That would be A380 economies of scale on the mega longhaul routes- even the airlines which are still sending Jumbos and cripple 7s to australasia have had their ticket prices downgraded by the new super size planes offering cheaper fares.

Let us hope these beasts start flying transatlantic and to the Caribbean, to impact on fares - but doubtful for the latter, since their airports/runways are not big enough.

IC...very interesting point.

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  • 309 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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