Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Is Unemployment A Price Worth Paying?


Recommended Posts

That's right. The only way to fix the problem is to make people dead. I predict WWIII in my lifetime.

That is the traditional solution Johnny, but luckily enough at 51 I I am too old to be conscripted to stand in a trench in Belgium for six months, and technology has moved on anyway, so I will probably die in the same bomb attack which kills everybody, even the top 1% of earners, Johnny! ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Better another unemployed than another public sector employee

But that is a no brainer

The less public sector employees the less burden on the rest of us

You got the no brains bit right, or at least not one that you put to effective use. :angry:

Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Governor shows himself perfectly happy in the spectacle of Britain possessing the finest credit in the world simultaneously with a million and a quarter unemployed. I would rather see Finance less proud and Industry more content”

Churchill

Half the people who spout on about Churchill these days would struggle to agree with a lot of the things that he did and said in his time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the real unemployment. Just because someone gets up early, sits in traffic and then sits at a desk it doesn't mean they are doing anyone any good. I estimate the number of people who are just sitting there absorbing money in your typical workplace is greater than 50%, ive certainly never been in any workplace where it was less.

That I can broadly agree with. I have never worked in the public sector but I have worked for huge corporations as well as small concerns where I was alongside the owner and just a few other employees. Even in the smallest companies there was waste and folk who did not pull their weight. It was in the big companies that the real problem existed. Far too many layers of middle men creating things that "needed doing" that were not needed at all and all the time doing very little of worth themselves. The problem with the public sector is only that it is also a large concern. An awful lot of nonsense is spouted about not getting away with that kind of thing in the private sector but according to my experience there is not much difference when organisations become large.

Link to post
Share on other sites
What is important is the number of people who are contributing, not whether they are classified as unemployed or not.

The aim of productivity is to reduce that number as fast as possible- and we expend a lot of R&D resources to make sure this happens.

Given that 'productivity' is one of the main preoccupations of our society, you could argue that unemployment should be seen as a metric of success- not failure- what other indicator more clearly demonstrates increased productivity than the elinimation of jobs?

We could have the minister appearing on the six o'clock news proudly heralding the latest increase in unemployment as proof of just how the nations productivity is increasing, 'even less people needed in the production of goods and services that make this nation strong' he could cry, smiling into the camera- 'and we intend to further increase the number of unemployed by ever greater deployment of technology and innovation- thus increasing producivity still further.'

Human labour is a sign of failure in the productive process- a cost centre that impacts negatively on the bottom line and one that all goverments seek to reduce- not that they put it in quite that way, of course. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

The deficit is actually only around 4 billion a month. It's still lots, but not as bad as everyone thinks.

This is the TRADE DEFICIT. This is the amount of money that Britain actually needs to borrow from foreigners. This is the figure we should be focusing on. But whilst we are doing that, we can start cutting the army, navy, air force, GPs, bankers, lawyers, dentists, lanlords, defence companies, and the multitude of other parasites that legally suck the money out of the rest of the economy whilst the rest of us are so busy fighting amongst ourselves that we don't notice what is happening.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do we need full employment anyway?

Surely with technological and productivity related improvements a smaller proportion of the population can sustain the country?

What's wrong with having more leisure?

Isn't that the purpose of increasing productivity?

Why can't we all work three days a week....because some want to work seven and some would rather work none. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

The deficit is actually only around 4 billion a month. It's still lots, but not as bad as everyone thinks.

This is the TRADE DEFICIT. This is the amount of money that Britain actually needs to borrow from foreigners. This is the figure we should be focusing on. But whilst we are doing that, we can start cutting the army, navy, air force, GPs, bankers, lawyers, dentists, lanlords, defence companies, and the multitude of other parasites that legally suck the money out of the rest of the economy whilst the rest of us are so busy fighting amongst ourselves that we don't notice what is happening.

I quite like not being ill and not having toothache.

Why are these highly trained health workers parasites?!

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's right. The only way to fix the problem is to make people dead. I predict WWIII in my lifetime.

I agree, although I think they will be cleverer with their technique of choice this time. This time I think it'll be a deliberately introduced virus into the general population. They've already collected enough transmission vector data with their trial runs of bird and swine flu, now we'll see the real, lethal to the non-elite deal.

Imagine how the elite will live after a 99.99% die-off with the benefits of modern science, medicine, technology and the remaining fossil fuels?

Like gods, that's how.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, although I think they will be cleverer with their technique of choice this time. This time I think it'll be a deliberately introduced virus into the general population. They've already collected enough transmission vector data with their trial runs of bird and swine flu, now we'll see the real, lethal to the non-elite deal.

Imagine how the elite will live after a 99.99% die-off with the benefits of modern science, medicine, technology and the remaining fossil fuels?

Like gods, that's how.

Why don't we just ship them off to Australia like we used to?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, although I think they will be cleverer with their technique of choice this time. This time I think it'll be a deliberately introduced virus into the general population. They've already collected enough transmission vector data with their trial runs of bird and swine flu, now we'll see the real, lethal to the non-elite deal.

Imagine how the elite will live after a 99.99% die-off with the benefits of modern science, medicine, technology and the remaining fossil fuels?

Like gods, that's how.

Yes, it wouldn't be difficult. All you would need would be pre-vaccination for those in charge of the project and the others necessary to implement it..

Unfortunately for Johnny, I think he would be less likely to receive such a vaccination than somebody capable of throwing corpses into a furnace ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.