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Realistbear

Sterling Down 200 Bp Vs. The $ -- Is It Ready For Another Collapse?

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even less so for the soon to be bankrupt USA, enough with the dollar ramping already,sheesh...

Enough? :blink:

This is a very important topic and affects us all in one way or the other. As the last man standing in the HPI stakes the UK is alone in not having seen its currency hit as a result of the global collapse among all nations who fed at the HPI trough.

When the houses go Sterling goes with them. Always been that way IMO.

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If the ultimate hard money is bullets, the US has the greatest reserves, no?

No, that will be Germany. 4th Reich may be here sooner than we expect it. Who knows, 4th time lucky for them--watch out Poland!

1 GBP 1.56145

Hovered at 1.5604 but got bought back from the brink. 300bp down in a day is crash speed.

The US have already paid their dues with a 40-50% HPC--we should be

man enough as a nation to take the punishment and not run from a massive HPC:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-12-15/industrial-production-in-u-s-rises-more-than-forecast-on-electronic-goods.html

Industrial production in the U.S. increased more than forecast in November and consumer prices slowed, indicating the recovery is gaining momentum without generating inflation.

Output at factories, mines and utilities rose 0.4 percent, the biggest gain since July, after a revised 0.2 percent drop in October, a Federal Reserve report showed today in Washington. The consumer-price index climbed 0.1 percent in November after a 0.2 percent gain the prior month, the Labor Department said.

Edited by Realistbear

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No, that will be Germany. 4th Reich may be here sooner than we expect it. Who knows, 4th time lucky for them--watch out Poland!

1 GBP 1.56145

Hovered at 1.5604 but got bought back from the brink. 300bp down in a day is crash speed.

:lol:

She'll not take much more of this, Jim!

Scotty1.jpg

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1 GBP 1.55984

Haven't seen this much action to the downside in a single day for a very long time.

Could the spotlight be turning on the UK? Some of the larger FX traders (PNB especially) said this would happen toward the end of this year. Euro has taken a beating, then the $ and now us?

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Without even bothering to look, I bet* that NOK, JPY, EUR are also weaker and that CAD is (ever-so-slightly) stronger.

Oh, and that XAU sold too.

(* it's rigged bet, ask yourself what you'd be buying if you were selling mid and long-dated US Treasuries)

If you want to think about things that might actually move GBP, try thinking about BP's asset disposals.

Which their new CEO says "won't fundamentally change the company".

Edited by ParticleMan

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1 GBP 1.55984

Haven't seen this much action to the downside in a single day for a very long time.

Could the spotlight be turning on the UK? Some of the larger FX traders (PNB especially) said this would happen toward the end of this year. Euro has taken a beating, then the $ and now us?

Sterling's had an oh so easy ride so far...

I just wonder if Bennie is creating a bond crisis before the new Congress takes office...

You know, let's 'em know who's boss...

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Wow not the £ crashing again against the dollar

1980 £1=$1.60

1990 £1=$1.60

2000 £1=$1.60

and now 2010

£1=$1.60

It is a rollercoaster ride and no mistaking.

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it's a perfct buy signal. Ftse will soar tomorrow...:ph34r:

This used to be the way it went--all fundamentals, especially negative ones, were a buy signal. Because the traders are simply pushing one currency and then another without regard to fundamentals?

1 GBP 1.55945

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Wow not the £ crashing again against the dollar

1980 £1=$1.60

1990 £1=$1.60

2000 £1=$1.60

and now 2010

£1=$1.60

It is a rollercoaster ride and no mistaking.

Tree years ago it was 2.13. Earlier this year (just before the Koalishon) it hit 1.37 momentarily. If your timing gets lucky you can do well.

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Enough? :blink:

This is a very important topic and affects us all in one way or the other. As the last man standing in the HPI stakes the UK is alone in not having seen its currency hit as a result of the global collapse among all nations who fed at the HPI trough.

When the houses go Sterling goes with them. Always been that way IMO.

the most important issue is the enormous debt of the USA (and the west in general) and there structural inability to cope very well with everything when the bubble finally pops like iceland etc

britain will cope better that the US just by virtue of our smaller land mass and relatively better infrastructure etc..

however a bi-flationary collapse of the entire western debt based monetary system is now inevitable.

thus in light of this the movements on the forex markets are akin to the deck chairs shifting around on the deck of the titanic, and thus your constant posting of seemingly good news for holders of US denominated assets is smacking of a fundamental miss understanding of the gravity of the situation, or a V.I. or both.

the only real issue left is will the next war start before or after the final collapse event.

as far as the US having the most things that go boom the internal conflict that would result from the war will lead to the probable collapse of the union and the USA ceasing to be the "leader of the free world" (banking cartel enforcer)

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Wow not the £ crashing again against the dollar

1980 £1=$1.60

1990 £1=$1.60

2000 £1=$1.60

and now 2010

£1=$1.60

It is a rollercoaster ride and no mistaking.

With a range of £1 = $1 to £1 = $2.20 during that period, no?

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the most important issue is the enormous debt of the USA (and the west in general) and there structural inability to cope very well with everything when the bubble finally pops like iceland etc

britain will cope better that the US just by virtue of our smaller land mass and relatively better infrastructure etc..

however a bi-flationary collapse of the entire western debt based monetary system is now inevitable.

thus in light of this the movements on the forex markets are akin to the deck chairs shifting around on the deck of the titanic, and thus your constant posting of seemingly good news for holders of US denominated assets is smacking of a fundamental miss understanding of the gravity of the situation, or a V.I. or both.

the only real issue left is will the next war start before or after the final collapse event.

as far as the US having the most things that go boom the internal conflict that would result from the war will lead to the probable collapse of the union and the USA ceasing to be the "leader of the free world" (banking cartel enforcer)

I suppose it just one person't opinion vs. another. If we all agreed we would all be controlled by the controller.

If the US ends someone has to takeover and as much as Putin would like to I don't think a resurgent USSR is on the cards. Germany is not there yet despite their history of sudden invasions of all around them. We are past it. That leaves China but they are not realy into invading faraway places. The Japs had their fling in 1941 and only really succeeded in taking SE Asia and a big chunk of China and a few Pacific Islands.

Whose boot would you like to come under? China is the only viable candidate other than the US IMO.

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Tree years ago it was 2.13. Earlier this year (just before the Koalishon) it hit 1.37 momentarily. If your timing gets lucky you can do well.

Sterling hasn't retested the $1.37 level yet. It will.

Edited by Toto deVeer

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With a range of £1 = $1 to £1 = $2.20 during that period, no?

Parity was nearly reached in 1977 IIRC. Volatile history but if you look at it decade at a time not much has happened in the last 30 year.

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Tree years ago it was 2.13. Earlier this year (just before the Koalishon) it hit 1.37 momentarily. If your timing gets lucky you can do well.

Indeed I did, thanks to you, when I exchanged at $2 to the pound.

I thought Sterling was going to be the 'big boy' currency next year? :blink: I can see this thing going below $1.50 easily before year-end and then down to $1.30 during the great recovery.

Interest rates will have to rise or there's going to be a lot of people walking to work, if they have work, that is. :rolleyes:

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the most important issue is the enormous debt of the USA (and the west in general) and there structural inability to cope very well with everything when the bubble finally pops like iceland etc

britain will cope better that the US just by virtue of our smaller land mass and relatively better infrastructure etc..

however a bi-flationary collapse of the entire western debt based monetary system is now inevitable.

thus in light of this the movements on the forex markets are akin to the deck chairs shifting around on the deck of the titanic, and thus your constant posting of seemingly good news for holders of US denominated assets is smacking of a fundamental miss understanding of the gravity of the situation, or a V.I. or both.

the only real issue left is will the next war start before or after the final collapse event.

as far as the US having the most things that go boom the internal conflict that would result from the war will lead to the probable collapse of the union and the USA ceasing to be the "leader of the free world" (banking cartel enforcer)

So in this scenario, the UK comes out in front of the US who have the biggest, baddest defence force, the highest debt (which presumably would be "forgiven") and still a huge amount of untapped natural resources (oil, gas even gold) as compared with the UK which imports most stuff it meeds and has dwinlding oil reserves (in fact almost none worth speaking of)?? I love an optimist but you are definetly taking the proverbial. "Smaller land mass". Really don't connect the dots on that argument at all. Sorry.

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Parity was nearly reached in 1977 IIRC. Volatile history but if you look at it decade at a time not much has happened in the last 30 year.

Stop it RB, you are tempting the Gods. Merv will print and you will be paying £10,000 a month for a bedsit in Hastings.laugh.gif

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Sterling hasn't retested the $1.37 level yet. It will.

Unlike HPC's resident tasseographists I'd suggest that :-

1/ USD is more likely to surprise to the upside than trade sideways, sink, or plummet

2/ When it does, GBP will likewise strengthen - to around the USDGBP 1.60-and-change mark

3/ That the cause will be a near breakdown in EUR-denominateds

I'd flesh it out with the back story laid out for all to see in the DX chart, but it's well past beer thirty and I just can't be bothered.

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I suppose it just one person't opinion vs. another. If we all agreed we would all be controlled by the controller.

If the US ends someone has to takeover and as much as Putin would like to I don't think a resurgent USSR is on the cards. Germany is not there yet despite their history of sudden invasions of all around them. We are past it. That leaves China but they are not realy into invading faraway places. The Japs had their fling in 1941 and only really succeeded in taking SE Asia and a big chunk of China and a few Pacific Islands.

Whose boot would you like to come under? China is the only viable candidate other than the US IMO.

I will warm my boots up now.

Any HPCers up for a bit of henchmanning?

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The US have already paid their dues with a 40-50% HPC--we should be

man enough as a nation to take the punishment and not run from a massive HPC:

This is what should really scare the British mortgagee....I'm looking at California property that is barely priced above the land value and people are still not buying! If Britain gets even a taste of this it will be a wild ride. Only a fool would risk buying a home in Britain at the moment....still enough of them around. ;)

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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