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Deloitte To Bypass Graduates And Recruit From Schools.

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Sounds like a plan.

For lots of jobs a degree is just a bit of paper...

Clearly Deloitte think that accountancy is one of those jobs and they should know. It wouldn't suprise me if even an A-Level in mathematics is an over-qualification, as how many accountants have to do calculus and lots of algebra?

Of course you have to be intelligent, a good worker, thorough and motivated to be good, but a degree is an expensive way to prove that.

edit: grrr my spelling.

Edited by SomethingHasToGive

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Yes, that's the thing, it is going to be cheaper to employ people who haven't got degrees because they won't need to be paid as much as they don't have student debts to repay. So anybody who has spent several years at Uni has simply been working towards making themselves less employable in the future.

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Crikey, who wants to be an accountant at the age of 17?

I didn't want to be anything aged 17. Careers teacher found me a nuisance as I told her i wanted to be an astronaut.

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I didn't want to be anything aged 17. Careers teacher found me a nuisance as I told her i wanted to be an astronaut.

In our school careers guidance was "Have you considered the priesthood?"

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This is a very good idea , I think they will get some good candidates by offering a good job three years early and a load of debt early, they all used to recruit at 18 anyway in accounting firms ...

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I didn't want to be anything aged 17. Careers teacher found me a nuisance as I told her i wanted to be an astronaut.

lol

Our careers advisor plugged our details in to a computer which suggested we all become art gallery attendants, and not bother with university.

If only I'd listened.

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So, go on then Father Rare Bear - did you consider it? ;)

The only thing I wanted to become was a pilot. Measles screwed up my eyesight and put a stop to that.

The funny thing about him asking about the priesthood bit was that when I replied no all he said was that there were quite a lot of leaflets about careers in the school. True enough and fairly prominently placed were quite a few about the British Army. This was in a Catholic school in NI in the mid '60s.

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It's a good idea. I generally avoid people with degrees, especially mba's. You have to get them to unlearn all that unnecessary crap and teach them how you want things done.

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It's a good idea. I generally avoid people with degrees, especially mba's. You have to get them to unlearn all that unnecessary crap and teach them how you want things done.

It depends.

I used to work for an electronics manufacturer. Those with higher degrees in subjects related to the industry just need teaching how the business worked, as they were placed within a section of the company which suited their knowledge.

However, when it came to the annual intake of general 'graduate trainees', I couldn't agree more. Those who had joined after higher degrees were generally the biggest pain in the backside.

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Funny how things go full circle. Let's hope we see more of this sort of thing, and government support for it.

Wouldn't that be great? To feel that at 16 you could get a job like it was in my day?

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You didn't need to be a graduate to be an ACA at one time and I think having a degree only saved one year in the professional exams and you had to do a conversion course if you had a "non relevant degree." So you could be almost qualified, and be ahead of your graduate friends.

I think the demand for graduates came from the professional organisations. For instance at one time you could be come a non graduate Chartered Engineer and now I think it would be impossible coming up via the "technician" route.

Edited by Sir John Steed

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The big 4/5/6/etc accounting firms have always made at least some of this type of hire, especially in provincial offices.

I guess they're saying they might do it a bit more often but it's hardly a mega-story IMO.

Agreed. As a (then) big six milk round graduate it was clear that graduates were over-educated for the work they were doing. I got my graduate conversion diploma and I was essentially at the same level as someone who left after A Levels with a year's foundation behind them. Three or four years of education for a one year head start.

Essentially the large accountancy firms are using the university system as a lawsuit free IQ test.

As far as an A Level intake I'd be amazed if Deloitte was not doing this already, I know one big four firm is. I suspect that this is a bit of free publicity on the back of the fees. If they can get a few bright debt-frightened kids then that's a bonus. That''s why I went for accountancy rather than law training, the lack of debt.

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You didn't need to be a graduate to be an ACA at one time and I think having a degree only saved one year in the professional exams and you had to do a conversion course if you had a "non relevant degree." So you could be almost qualified, and be ahead of your graduate friends.

I think the demand for graduates came from the professional organisations. For instance at one time you could be come a non graduate Chartered Engineer and now I think it would be impossible coming up via the "technician" route.

You can still come in from A Level:

http://www.icaew.com/index.cfm/route/159082/icaew_ga/en/Qualifications/Train_for_the_ACA/Entry_routes/A_Level_to_ACA

Most really small firm trainees are A Level as they don't have the university reach (and pay a bit less). A friend of mine did that and made partner in another firm. I'm still at manager level.

One of the tragedies of residential university is that most graduates have lost many of their home town contacts and not built any contacts at their university town. So unless you have an accountant in your family it's going to have to be milk round or bust.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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