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LuckyOne

God Given Rights .......

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Our family had a confusing and controversial conversation this evening.

At first, we discussed the "divine right" of the Royal Family to rule over its subjects. We struggled to understand this.

We then migrated to the "god given right" to a university degree at well below market cost that many people in this country assume. We struggled to undertand this too.

Our conclusion was that the "right" of the Royal family to rule and the "right" to a below market cost education are two sides of the same coin. We also concluded that the left and the right are conceding logic to rhetoric without understanding the flaws in their logic.

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Our family had a confusing and controversial conversation this evening.

At first, we discussed the "divine right" of the Royal Family to rule over its subjects. We struggled to understand this.

We then migrated to the "god given right" to a university degree at well below market cost that many people in this country assume. We struggled to undertand this too.

Our conclusion was that the "right" of the Royal family to rule and the "right" to a below market cost education are two sides of the same coin. We also concluded that the left and the right are conceding logic to rhetoric without understanding the flaws in their logic.

Wouldn't the right to a degree be more to do with the withholding of information and charging for it. A social contract allowing such behaviour by the state on behalf of the people.

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Our family had a confusing and controversial conversation this evening.

At first, we discussed the "divine right" of the Royal Family to rule over its subjects. We struggled to understand this.

We then migrated to the "god given right" to a university degree at well below market cost that many people in this country assume. We struggled to undertand this too.

Our conclusion was that the "right" of the Royal family to rule and the "right" to a below market cost education are two sides of the same coin. We also concluded that the left and the right are conceding logic to rhetoric without understanding the flaws in their logic.

Our family was fighting over the last Tesco Value meatball...

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Our family had a confusing and controversial conversation this evening.

At first, we discussed the "divine right" of the Royal Family to rule over its subjects. We struggled to understand this.

We then migrated to the "god given right" to a university degree at well below market cost that many people in this country assume. We struggled to undertand this too.

Our conclusion was that the "right" of the Royal family to rule and the "right" to a below market cost education are two sides of the same coin. We also concluded that the left and the right are conceding logic to rhetoric without understanding the flaws in their logic.

All rights are generally a matter of opinion. Not even the right to life is without opinion - see any capital punishment or war debate for example.

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I've always wondered at which point in my life I agreed to abide by the law of the land.

Why should I pay tax?

Why shouldn't I steal from other people?

Why shouldn't I kill someone if I wish to do so?

Extreme examples but when did I sign the contract of life?

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the "divine right of kings" went out in the 17th century you know......

Ultimately all rights are bestowed on you by someone who is able to enforce that they are respected.

We might argue that we all have a right to life and freedom etc, but in the absence of freedom the fact is that you can't enforce your right so it is in effect irrelevant.

For all its ills that is why I am glad the USA is the dominant superpower of the world and not Russia or China for example

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I've always wondered at which point in my life I agreed to abide by the law of the land.

Why should I pay tax?

Why shouldn't I steal from other people?

Why shouldn't I kill someone if I wish to do so?

Extreme examples but when did I sign the contract of life?

Look up the 'freeman' movement. They reckon that your birth certificate creates the legal 'you' that means you are subject to laws passed by parliament and that the real you can only be subject to common law. It's not the question you asked, i'm sure, but an interesting one nonetheless.

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Our family had a confusing and controversial conversation this evening.

At first, we discussed the "divine right" of the Royal Family to rule over its subjects. We struggled to understand this.

We then migrated to the "god given right" to a university degree at well below market cost that many people in this country assume. We struggled to undertand this too.

Our conclusion was that the "right" of the Royal family to rule and the "right" to a below market cost education are two sides of the same coin. We also concluded that the left and the right are conceding logic to rhetoric without understanding the flaws in their logic.

Is a degree provided below market cost? Really? Perhaps it is in a course that needs elaborate technology and laboratories but for the typical essay-based arts or humanities subject a 'degree' consists of little more than a reading list and having someone mark your essays.

It may not be as fun as living away from home at Uni, but many degrees lend themselves brilliantly to distance learning. A lecture attended by 50 people could be attended by unlimited numbers via the web.

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I used to believe the monarchy was worse than having a president.then I met a bloke in the pub who used the Cherie Blair argument.I became a hypocrite and a monarchist.

Yep, I was a hardcore republican once. Then I realised it meant we could end up with someone like Tony Blair as president with Gordon Brown as PM, and I shifted my position pretty sharpish.

I don't like privilege whatsoever, but there comes a point where you realise putting up with smelly cheese is far better than drinking arsenic.

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Is a degree provided below market cost? Really? Perhaps it is in a course that needs elaborate technology and laboratories but for the typical essay-based arts or humanities subject a 'degree' consists of little more than a reading list and having someone mark your essays.

It may not be as fun as living away from home at Uni, but many degrees lend themselves brilliantly to distance learning. A lecture attended by 50 people could be attended by unlimited numbers via the web.

I agree.

Most courses at UK unis could be done by distance learning. Both of my kids are in their second year at "respectable" unis in the UK and spend a total of 8 hours a week in lectures and seminars. The difference between this and the OU is not statistically material.

A quick google search will reveal that I am a huge fan of the OU and the drive and ambition required to study in isolation.

The question does boil down to one that I asked on a different thread : Is education a product or an experience? The answer to that question leads naturally to a choice about delivery as well as the classification of unis and polys.

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Yep, I was a hardcore republican once. Then I realised it meant we could end up with someone like Tony Blair as president with Gordon Brown as PM, and I shifted my position pretty sharpish.

I don't like privilege whatsoever, but there comes a point where you realise putting up with smelly cheese is far better than drinking arsenic.

About right.

As to the education thing - why the heck should research publications be inaccessible, except at exhorbitant cost, to anyone outside of the academic system. The work going in to them (the expensive bit) has generally been publically funded, but the printing is private.

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Yep, I was a hardcore republican once. Then I realised it meant we could end up with someone like Tony Blair as president with Gordon Brown as PM, and I shifted my position pretty sharpish.

I don't like privilege whatsoever, but there comes a point where you realise putting up with smelly cheese is far better than drinking arsenic.

You're just waving a scarecrow there, picking the least competant people as potential presidents. At least the likes of Blair could be voted out after 1 term, like their US, French, or German equivalents are, if we didn't like them. But we'll be stuck with King Charles (and his plants) until he kicks the bucket, and we'll never be able to vote any of them out if we don't like them.

Time for the UK to be a proper grown up democracy, and for the populace to take full responsibility for those whom we should choose as our leaders.

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There's no right but it's in the countries interest to get the working class up the mobility ladder. Really a degree should be acheived by over 60% of the population.....but for this to happen we need to raise the standard of schools.

All this costs money, needs to be paid for and the fair way of doing it is through taxation. The simple way of doing this is to raise income tax for all.

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There's no right but it's in the countries interest to get the working class up the mobility ladder. Really a degree should be acheived by over 60% of the population.....but for this to happen we need to raise the standard of schools.

All this costs money, needs to be paid for and the fair way of doing it is through taxation. The simple way of doing this is to raise income tax for all.

Thats a bit like saying that 60% of the entrants in any competition should be in the first 3 places or that everyone should have an above average standard of living.

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We then migrated to the "god given right" to a university degree at well below market cost that many people in this country assume. We struggled to undertand this too.

How does that differ from a primary or secondary education? Why do we subsidise those?

The difference, it seems, is one of degree. A primary education is pretty fundamental to modern life, but could you say the same of keeping bored and disaffected teenagers in class against their will? Or, at the top end, of giving bright youngsters half a dozen of their best years twiddling their thumbs and learning that everything is trivial and they need never do a stroke of work because life spoonfeeds you the certainty of a position at the top?

Perhaps we should have a proper market, and with it the flexibility to choose. Academically it could make a lot of sense to go from primary straight to university and cut out the getting-bored middle. Maybe taking a job and getting world experience and maturity from about age 12, thus becoming an altogether more mature student at 18 (or 16, or 25, or 50 - let's make it much more flexible).

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Thats a bit like saying that 60% of the entrants in any competition should be in the first 3 places or that everyone should have an above average standard of living.

No it isn't.

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There's no right but it's in the countries interest to get the working class up the mobility ladder. Really a degree should be acheived by over 60% of the population.....but for this to happen we need to raise the standard of schools.

All this costs money, needs to be paid for and the fair way of doing it is through taxation. The simple way of doing this is to raise income tax for all.

Why 60%? Do 60% of our nations jobs require a degree (with associated debt/taxes)?

Hilarious!

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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