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What's Your Personal Inflation Rate ?

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Put simply, higher taxation and higher personal inflation = less money for the masses to spend (or want to spend) on housing

So what's your personal inflation rate been like over the last 2 years? Post your version here.

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/PIC/index.html

Here's mine - no childcare, no car, renting, no spend on useless tat, although big spender on airfares due to family abroad

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This calculator thing is BS, because it doesn't take account of changing values over the time period it charts (i.e. it assumes that your outgoings in each category are the same throughout, which in many cases they won't be), and of course it doesn't take into account any tax outgoings apart from council tax.

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I find it hard to calculate as my biggest monthly expense was my mortgage which has come down from £1300 to £330 a month so there would have to be massive price rises before those savings were lost.

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I find it hard to calculate as my biggest monthly expense was my mortgage which has come down from £1300 to £330 a month so there would have to be massive price rises before those savings were lost.

...you're in negative inflation ..... :rolleyes:

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This calculator thing is BS, because it doesn't take account of changing values over the time period it charts (i.e. it assumes that your outgoings in each category are the same throughout, which in many cases they won't be), and of course it doesn't take into account any tax outgoings apart from council tax.

Agreed, the calculator has its limitations, and fails to take into account tax changes, or indeed the type of mortgage that a single individual holds, amongst other failings.

But it illustrates in graphical form why homeowners got bullish and a bit smug in 2009. Rising house prices and a reduced cost of living. "What recession?" was the quip of many of my middle class work colleagues at the time. Those same people are now seeing a different world.

Edited by Diet Cola Addict

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Agreed, the calculator has its limitations, and fails to take into account tax changes, or indeed the type of mortgage that a single individual holds, amongst other failings.

But it illustrates in graphical form why homeowners got bullish and a bit smug in 2009. Rising house prices and a reduced cost of living. "What recession?" was the quip of many of my middle class work colleagues at the time. Those same people are now seeing a different world.

Not many of them will have changed their attitude, unless they've had people close to them lose jobs. The mortgage is still £1000 a month less than they were paying 22 months ago, and they are probably still spending this "extra" money on frivolous things rather than paying the mortgage off as hard and fast as they can, which they should be doing. The eventual creep of interest rates will hit these people hard, and damn them to extra pain. But it's their own fault if they haven't been sensible enough to pay a good £25-30K off the capital in this time.

My personal inflation rate was pretty much the same as the first guys. Consistently above until the interest rate cuts worked their way through, and now below by a point or two.

Edited by lardboy

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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