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eric pebble

We're All Doomed! The West's Decline.

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We're all doomed!

Scary reading.

"....one of the cleverest men I know — you have probably read one of his books or seen the film.

He spent the next hour talking me through his scenario for a collapse of the entire Western financial and commercial system: ‘Do you realise that every company in the land including the supermarkets operates on 24-hour inventories?

‘Nobody holds reserves of anything. Just imagine what life would be like, if you put your card into a hole-in-the-wall and nothing came out — there simply wasn’t any money.’"

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1336300/Were-doomed--We-havent-woken-poorer-West-going-future-.html#ixzz17PvrAW00

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We're all doomed!

Scary reading.

"....one of the cleverest men I know — you have probably read one of his books or seen the film.

He spent the next hour talking me through his scenario for a collapse of the entire Western financial and commercial system: ‘Do you realise that every company in the land including the supermarkets operates on 24-hour inventories?

‘Nobody holds reserves of anything. Just imagine what life would be like, if you put your card into a hole-in-the-wall and nothing came out — there simply wasn’t any money.’"

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1336300/Were-doomed--We-havent-woken-poorer-West-going-future-.html#ixzz17PvrAW00

I would go home and admire my pile of baked bean cans.

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If the wests financial and commercial surely the east would be following close behind. So a global collapse.

So what if no one holds inventories? Even if they had a weeks worth it would just delay the inevitable chaos by one week or probably less in the event if a collapse.

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I always assumed this was the scenario when oil runs out. But, of course, it could happen at any moment.

Those with shotguns are going to be in a better situation than others.

(Always did hate the neighbours cats - first to go in the pot)

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Supermarkets may have only a days supply of stuff, but so what, that stuff is still in the supply chain somewhere, just not at the supermarkets.

The risk is that a banking collapse causes credit to collapse, which means no one in the supply chain will sell to the next tier. That of course can happen, but shouldnt. The supermarkets can repair the chain by paying for stuff up front. It would cost them, but they could do it if necessary.

And if everyone came to the supermarket at once, like you get when there is rampant inflation, supermarkets can put their prices up pretty sharpish. I just hope though, that they can also switch the currency that they accept overnight, hyper-inflation is a real possibility now.

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snip:

And if everyone came to the supermarket at once, like you get when there is rampant inflation, supermarkets can put their prices up pretty sharpish. I just hope though, that they can also switch the currency that they accept overnight, hyper-inflation is a real possibility now.

So true.

Off topic but:

When I was a kid, we spent our days hunting and fishing and making bivouacs. We always had airgun pellets in our pockets, and catapults. We knew how to stalk and kill and cook. We would live rough and play rough. Supermarkets didn’t exist.

Kids don’t know any of this stuff anymore - so will all starve.

Sorry - better get back on the thread again.

(They'll all starve though :) )

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Supermarkets may have only a days supply of stuff, but so what, that stuff is still in the supply chain somewhere, just not at the supermarkets.

The risk is that a banking collapse causes credit to collapse, which means no one in the supply chain will sell to the next tier. That of course can happen, but shouldnt. The supermarkets can repair the chain by paying for stuff up front. It would cost them, but they could do it if necessary.

And if everyone came to the supermarket at once, like you get when there is rampant inflation, supermarkets can put their prices up pretty sharpish. I just hope though, that they can also switch the currency that they accept overnight, hyper-inflation is a real possibility now.

At this point the supermarket will be "cash only". I agree with you it is theoretically workable, but had the world governments let the banks go down in 2008 no one would have held enough cash to survive. Hence the bail out, hence the sh1t we are now in.

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At this point the supermarket will be "cash only". I agree with you it is theoretically workable, but had the world governments let the banks go down in 2008 no one would have held enough cash to survive. Hence the bail out, hence the sh1t we are now in.

The governments of the world could have taken the banks into public ownership, and given bondholders and depositors a haircut instead of fleecing taxpayers. They could have flooded the banks with equity, paid for and owned by the taxpayer, to make these banks solvent. That would have fixed the immediate problem of solvency.

Next they should have gone after and locked up the crooks that ran these banks. Putting them behind bars and seizing their ill gotten assets would have been a more permanent solution to the problem.

And the worst banks, NR and HBOS, should have been allowed to fail.

Edited by leicestersq

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some logic permeates the panic.

having said that,ol pedro will hole up with his two/three month supply of porridge and lentils(an excellent source of protein)

I hope you have a ton more water in addition to your drinking water to cook that shizzle in!

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The governments of the world could have taken the banks into public ownership, and given bondholders and depositors a haircut instead of fleecing taxpayers. They could have flooded the banks with equity, paid for and owned by the taxpayer, to make these banks solvent. That would have fixed the immediate problem of solvency.

Next they should have gone after and locked up the crooks that ran these banks. Putting them behind bars and seizing their ill gotten assets would have been a more permanent solution to the problem.

And the worst banks, NR and HBOS, should have been allowed to fail.

Agree with you absolutely 100%.

James Crosby - 30 years in jail. Public Execution.

ALL bankers - handcuffed to their desks - salary £18k max.

ALL banks turned into public utilities.

PLUS: ALL those responsible for the manufacture and distribution of PREDATORY LIAR LOANS: Death sentence.

Edited by eric pebble

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"....one of the cleverest men I know — you have probably read one of his books or seen the film.

He spent the next hour talking me through his scenario for a collapse of the entire Western financial and commercial system: ‘Do you realise that every company in the land including the supermarkets operates on 24-hour inventories?

He's either hugely misquoted, massively exaggerating or completely retarded.

I've worked for two of the largest 50 food producing companies in the world, both of which supplied the supermarkets extensively. We worked very hard to keep stocks to a minimal level, because it helped keep cost down, but even working with fresh goods the time line wasn't this short (although I accept there are exceptions).

Availability is actually one of the areas supermarkets compete on these days (as anyone in the groceries sector knows) which has meant supermarket supply chains aren't pushing as hard to minimise stock holdings and are instead optimising those holdings to maximise availability. But what do I know, it's not like my wage is paid by a company that relies on understanding this to survive...

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i do believe we are living through the fall of Rome, in a sense - 'Old Rome' has gone, and 'Byzantium' over the pond will too. not sure when though, these things take time

i love the picture of 'typical gardener' in the article. look at her, gently tugging on that root tuber. mmmm

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i do believe we are living through the fall of Rome, in a sense - 'Old Rome' has gone, and 'Byzantium' over the pond will too. not sure when though, these things take time

Nah, Rome is just rising again under the guise of the European union. It couldn't be done violently, so it is being done economically and politically.

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If it ever got to the point of cash being worthless and fighting over scraps of food in the street I think I would just end it all. I wouldn't want to do that without at least inflicting some pain on those who were responsible though, so the question is, how best would I go about taking down some bankers with me? It won't be easy.

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One of the cleverest men I know.

...

...

He himself has invested his considerable fortune in houses rather than pension funds or shares.

Sometimes the continuous ramping just gets tedious.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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