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Irish Parliament Votes Today On Budget

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They are merely voting to 'buy time,' their situation is unsustainable and anyone who believes a debt problem can be fixed with more debt isn't firing on all cylinders.

Agreed but I do wander how many Turkeys will actually vote for Christmas. I would be very surprised if anyone who votes Yes gets returned at the Election.

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Agreed but I do wander how many Turkeys will actually vote for Christmas. I would be very surprised if anyone who votes Yes gets returned at the Election.

FF have got to accept that there is no way they will win the election early next year. If they have some honestly and love for Ireland in their souls they will conclude that doing the best for Ireland should come before trying to get some extra MP's elected.

They could produce a budget that may save Ireland i.e cut expenditure down to income by slashing public sector pay, pensions, putting up taxes to appropriate levels. Do it in one hit, take the pain and start growing from next year on.

Then pigs might fly.

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FF have got to accept that there is no way they will win the election early next year. If they have some honestly and love for Ireland in their souls they will conclude that doing the best for Ireland should come before trying to get some extra MP's elected.

They could produce a budget that may save Ireland i.e cut expenditure down to income by slashing public sector pay, pensions, putting up taxes to appropriate levels. Do it in one hit, take the pain and start growing from next year on.

Then pigs might fly.

I think theyd be trying to fend off assassination attempts, rather than worrying about reelection.

Edited by Lepista

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Let's face it, in the unlikely event sanity prevails and Cowen loses it, there will be another vote in a few weeks, with or without an election in between.

The only answer they will be permitted to give, today or at a future date, is 'YES'.

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The official unit of currency in Ireland is now the Euro which has replaced the Irish Pound (in the Irish language Punt - pronounced "poont"). However, the REAL until of currency in Ireland is the "brown envelope". This requires some explaining. Ireland has more bureaucracy per head of population than most countries (this is opinion and not backed up by lies, damn lies or statistics). Because of the multi-layered nature of this bureaucratic system, most issues that require handling become caught up ever increasing circles of shuffling and buck passing. This includes issues such as, but not limited to, planning permission, issuing of permits for various purposes and a whole series of other activities which I may not mention for fear on ending up in court. It seems that the only way to extract oneself from the infinite vortex is by waving a brown envelop (filled with cash) at an appropriate section of the bureaucracy Strangely, everybody in Ireland has known about this for many years - nay decades, hence my surprise at the national shock when it was revealed that a former Taoiseach (that's Prime Minister in English) received 8.5 million in hard currency (brown envelopes) over twenty years.

http://www.geoghegan.org/ireland/index.html

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A few Irish numbers:

Ballooning wages and a growing deficit: Ireland by numbers

£104.6bn - The amount of Irish government debt.

65.5pc - Government debt as a percentage of GDP.

£22.9bn - Ireland's government deficit.

14.4pc - Deficit as a percentage of GDP.

-7.6pc - Real GDP growth in 2009.

13.2pc - Ireland's unemployment rate.

€7.65 (£6.45) - Ireland's new minimum wage, set out as part of a four-year national recovery plan. The minimum wage was introduced in 2000, and was set at €5.59. It was increased six times since its introduction and stood 55pc higher than its original level when it rose to €8.65 in July 2007, making it the second-highest minimum wage in Europe at the time.

€17.7bn (£14.92bn) – the level of social welfare spending in 2008, an increase of 160pc on spending levels in 2000.

€196 (£165) – The current weekly rate of unemployment benefit. Social welfare payments have almost doubled between 2001 and 2009.

66 - The new age at which people will qualify for the state pension - to be introduced in 2014. Plans have also been outlined to increase the age to 67 in 2021, and 68 in 2028.

€35,904 (£30,255) - The average annual wage in Ireland.

€46,132.84 (£38,874) – Average earnings of a primary school worker in 2008.

59pc – The amount public service pay has increased by from 2000 to 2009.

€18,300 (£15,421) - The amount PAYE Irish workers can earn before paying income tax. The entry point to income tax has increased from €7,238 since 2000. The standard and higher tax rates have also fallen from 26pc and 48pc in 1997/98 to 20pc and 41pc by 2007.

As a result of these changes, the proportion of income earners exempt from income tax increased from 34pc in 2004 to an estimated 45pc in 2010.

4.5pc – The number of workers employed in the agricultural industry. Ireland's service industry employs 75.9pc of the workforce, while industry employs 19.6pc of Ireland's workforce.

30m - The number of Europeans catered for by Irish beef. Ireland is the largest beef exporter in Europe, and the fourth largest in the world. One in five burgers served in McDonald's restaurants in Europe are made from Irish beef.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financetopics/financialcrisis/8186310/Ballooning-wages-and-a-growing-deficit-Ireland-by-numbers.html

They shouldn't have to pay all that unemployment benefit when 45% of workers are outside paying tax!

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Lots of empty seats, what speeches I've listened to seem to be fairly routine and lacking in vigour.

Let's face it, how many of these ministers will actually be affected?

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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