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Nearly 60% Of Germans Want Their Deutschmark Back Instead Of Ailing Euro

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Can't blame 'em.

I don’t know how they ever sold the single currency to the German people (if they in fact did and didn’t just ride roughshod through public opinion).

Sweeping generalisation here but the German attitude to work is polar opposite to the Greek or the Portuguese. Their respective economies will always be different. Basically whilst ever there’s monetary union Germany will forever be on the hook to bail out these nations.

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With the DM, Germany would be in a serious recession due to thw fact that the German exports would be too expensive to sell as well as they do with the Euro. If the Germans who said they want the DM back knew that, then they wouldn't have said that they want the DM back.

Edited by wise_eagle

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is Jean-Claude a UKIP plant?
:D

Of course he`s not, it just that the people of certain countries in the EU are waking up to what a disaster the EU is becoming for them. Sadly the dictators hidden away in their darkened rooms will soon be moving into their bunkers so bigger political bombs will have to be detonated to finally flush them out so once again they can reclaim their freedom. ;)

With the DM, Germany would be in a serious recession due to thw fact that the German exports would be too expensive to sell as well as they do with the Euro. If the Germans who said they want the DM back knew that, then they wouldn't have said that they want the DM back.

:blink::rolleyes:

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Jerman public opinion does not have a good track record.

More than 95% of 'em thought Adolf was the bees and ees until some wheel fell off somewhere just outside Moscow.

If the Jermans are starting to think the euro is bad .... it probably isn't.

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"95% of them may have had no choice"

Well it is very hard to assess how they felt as there was no free press, no elections, no polling and no way to measure things except "maybe" concentration camp rosters and party rallies.

But you know .... it happened.

And most sensible historians think the Hun was well chuffed with stuff until Moscow 1940 whatev' and bomber command getting of the ground.

It's a bit the same with WW1.

They were all after starting it and were all in favour of it until it went tits up, least ways their most pungent, "Erich Maria Remarque" says so.

Just because Jermans make good cars and consumer durables it does not mean they are blessed with collective wisdom. That explains why Jermany has shrunk by one third since it united.

If Jerman public opinion points one way, get in one of their cars and drive the other.

Edited by indirectapproach

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With the DM, Germany would be in a serious recession due to thw fact that the German exports would be too expensive to sell as well as they do with the Euro. If the Germans who said they want the DM back knew that, then they wouldn't have said that they want the DM back.

Nope, the Germans sell price inelastic exports

Germany competes on quality, not price.

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Nope, the Germans sell price inelastic exports

Germany competes on quality, not price.

Not allowing ponzi banking to take over has been a key benefit to their economy too. Did they run a propoerty bubble to pretend their economy was doing fine, no. Do they have "brownfield" development planning restrictions where de-facto their industrial insfrastrusture has to be ripped down to build housing? Have businesses in German been able to access finance over the decades without having to take up crapola schemes to guranteee large bosnueses to banks and reducing benefit to the business themselves, generally, yes. All this adds up and adds up to more than just exchange rate competitiveness.

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Not allowing ponzi banking to take over has been a key benefit to their economy too. Did they run a propoerty bubble to pretend their economy was doing fine, no. Do they have "brownfield" development planning restrictions where de-facto their industrial insfrastrusture has to be ripped down to build housing? Have businesses in German been able to access finance over the decades without having to take up crapola schemes to guranteee large bosnueses to banks and reducing benefit to the business themselves, generally, yes. All this adds up and adds up to more than just exchange rate competitiveness.

But then again the Germans are bailing out the Greeks to rescue their own banks. Aren't their some German spin off banks involved in the Irish ponzi property lending scheme?

Their own economy may have avoided the excess of the clever bankers, but the clever bankers sought huge profits else where in Europe. I suspect that the Germans banks aren't quite as sound as the German economy is.

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Not allowing ponzi banking to take over has been a key benefit to their economy too. Did they run a propoerty bubble to pretend their economy was doing fine, no. Do they have "brownfield" development planning restrictions where de-facto their industrial insfrastrusture has to be ripped down to build housing? Have businesses in German been able to access finance over the decades without having to take up crapola schemes to guranteee large bosnueses to banks and reducing benefit to the business themselves, generally, yes. All this adds up and adds up to more than just exchange rate competitiveness.

Errrrr..............yes they did.

In Ireland, Spain etc etc.

Where do you think the piggies got all their money from? :blink: German banksters.

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It won't matter what the population think if they only have a selection of pro-Euro parties to choose from in their next general election.

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"Nope, the Germans sell price inelastic exports

Germany competes on quality, not price."

Not for so much of their stuff, which is why BMW have started making so many little cars.

Do you know what I mean by price inelastic?

Could you give me some examples of poorly differentiated Germany commodities that have a price elastic demand?

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Let's remind ourselves how well the Pound did against the D-Mark over the decades:

1960: 1 Pound = 11.71 DM

1970: 1 Pound = 8.74 DM

1980: 1 Pound = 4.23 DM

1990: 1 Pound = 2.88 DM

...bad for their exports ...which really took off when they joined the weaker Euro..... :rolleyes:

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"Do you know what I mean by price inelastic?

Could you give me some examples of poorly differentiated Germany commodities that have a price elastic demand?"

Well I assumed you meant price rises would have little or no impact on demand.

And I'm gonna do some guessing now but I bet that price has a part to pay in demand for BMW 3 series cars.

That might explain why you might find more BMW 3's per capita in Munich, where you can get them for about €27,000

http://www.autoscout24.eu/List.aspx?vis=1&state=A&make=13&model=1641&fuel=D&fregfrom=01%2f01%2f2009+00%3a00%3a00&fregto=12%2f31%2f2009+00%3a00%3a00&pricefrom=1000&kmfrom=20000&kmto=30000&cy=D&page=1&maxresults=500&results=20&ustate=N,U&zip=80331&um=True&sort=price&pool=1&zipc=D&zipr=50&mmvco=1&mmvmk0=13&mmvmd0=1641

than Windhoek, nice place, or it used to be when I was last there ten years ago, used to be a German colony and some of the old timers there still think it is, where they cost about €37,000

http://www.danricauto.com.na/BMW-3-Series-Namibia.html

If I am right about that, it would be because the BMW 3 series, the product that provides so much of BMW's profit is not a Veblen nor a Giffen good, which it isn't.

And that makes what you said wrong and what I said right, which it is.

Edited by indirectapproach

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"Do you know what I mean by price inelastic?

Could you give me some examples of poorly differentiated Germany commodities that have a price elastic demand?"

Well I assumed you meant price rises would have little or no impact on demand.

And I'm gonna do some guessing now but I bet that price has a part to pay in demand for BMW 3 series cars.

That might explain why you might find more BMW 3's per capita in Munich, where you can get them for about €27,000

http://www.autoscout24.eu/List.aspx?vis=1&state=A&make=13&model=1641&fuel=D&fregfrom=01%2f01%2f2009+00%3a00%3a00&fregto=12%2f31%2f2009+00%3a00%3a00&pricefrom=1000&kmfrom=20000&kmto=30000&cy=D&page=1&maxresults=500&results=20&ustate=N,U&zip=80331&um=True&sort=price&pool=1&zipc=D&zipr=50&mmvco=1&mmvmk0=13&mmvmd0=1641

than Windhoek, nice place, or it used to be when I was last there ten years ago, used to be a German colony and some of the old timers there still think it is, where they cost about €37,000

http://www.danricauto.com.na/BMW-3-Series-Namibia.html

If I am right about that, it would be because the BMW 3 series, the product that provides so much of BMW's profit is not a Veblen nor a Giffen good, which it isn't.

And that makes what you said wrong and what I said right, which it is.

...Munich is the home of BMW....would imagine in Windhoek the import duty is steep...... :rolleyes:

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Well I make that a price difference of 37%, which suggests Windhoek is still a pleasant place.

Ten years ago there were more beggars in London than in Windhoek but there were a lot of beggars in London back then,

Import duty seems surprisingly low.

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Well I make that a price difference of 37%, which suggests Windhoek is still a pleasant place.

Ten years ago there were more beggars in London than in Windhoek but there were a lot of beggars in London back then,

Import duty seems surprisingly low.

...think BMW also have an assembly plant in South Africa.... :rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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