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Record Numbers Of Grown-Up Sons And Daughters Moving Back In

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nice thread - but but - housing demand is inelastic, all these people should be renting executive apartments in city centres - it's all wrong, there should be a law!

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nice thread - but but - housing demand is inelastic, all these people should be renting executive apartments in city centres - it's all wrong, there should be a law!

" there ought to be a law, ought to be a whole lot a laws....if you want blood(bath) you got it......." :lol::lol: bring it on , nothing short of total collapse in the ponzi market will satisfy me now.

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nice thread - but but - housing demand is inelastic, all these people should be renting executive apartments in city centres - it's all wrong, there should be a law!

+ 1

Good thread Peter.

Housing demand IS VERY elastic. In all sort of manners. For instance, a 2 bedroom flat can accommodate 1 to 4 people. Affordability rules here too, as in any market.

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The proportion of men in their 20s living at home has risen from 59 per

cent to 80 per cent in the past 15 years

That can't be right.

Can it?

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"The proportion of men in their 20s living at home has risen from 59 per cent to 80 per cent in the past 15 years, while the number of women has risen from 41 per cent to 50 per cent." ­

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1335223/Why-record-numbers-grown-sons-daughters-moving-in.html#ixzz173K3qdoB

I infer from this that 80% of men in their 20s are currently living with their parents - that can't be right. I can't find the original report.

It annoys me that the media typically summarise reports and/or statistics without providing a link to the original source they're quoting from - bad practise whatever you look at it

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MUMMY’S BOY

DEBT-RIDDEN STUDENT

PERPETUAL CHILD

BOOMERANG DAUGHTER

You can just feel the anger seething in that article. The boomer bible is worried no-one's going to buy up their debts for them :lol:

Makes me so proud to hear of people finding any way they can to bring the pyramid down. We've picked up our ball and we're going home :lol:

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Sounds like an admission of defeat to me. Deep down, you KNOW house prices are not going to crash.

So what? They aren't going up either.

Way I see it, is rather than using my capital to buy a house, which means I would no longer have much of an opportunity to diversify, continuously rebalance and grow that fund at 20% or more per annum, I'll rent on the cheap and be well placed either way.

If they crash, I'll really be in the money, which I think over the next 3-4 years will happen. I don't expect 40% off next year, but I'm happy betting on 20% or more in 4 years.

By which time i'll have doubled my deposit and will be in a position to buy somewhere decent outright (I'm talking a 3/4 bed detached rather than a hovel). Or, if we still have incredibly volatile financial markets, maybe I'll continue to rent as the markets are effectively paying me to do so.

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read some of the daily mail comments from gordons generation.

'Please don't tar all us students with the same brush!! I have been unemployed for a year now and live at home. I have a Masters in Physics from a Russel group University. I would be glad to get ANY sort of work, there are too many applicants for the "graduate" jobs but I don't even get interviews for the local minimum wage jobs as I am too qualified. What are we supposed to do? I hate living at home but short of going on benefits I am forced to stay.'

holy f***** smoly.

getting on benefits is the only solution.

But I thought we had a knowledge based economy? I would have thought with his physics degree he would be welcome at B&Q as he would be able to tell people how to correctly hold the hammer and how to apply the correct force to hammer home the nail.

Clearly not trying hard enough.

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Hi

noted this picture from the article. the lady in orange has an enviable figure, and her companion seems fascinated by it...

Both are welcome to come and live with me :)

article-1335223-0C542F05000005DC-47_468x301.jpg

post-8507-0-29302100-1291381914_thumb.jpg

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Not without systemic banking collapse they won't. I hope your deposit is not in the bank.

IC...saying that, though, a housing market 6 times the size of ours has crashed, and is still falling..yet the US is still there with 6 big banks to our 3, steady jobs and steady currency.

odd.

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I'm one of these people! 26, good job and degree, big student loan, slightly bigger savings (after 3 years' work). Simple fact is - house prices are too high, never mind cost of living added on top! My siblings that are able to work don't - there are no jobs, and they are now trapped on benefits, almost doomed to stay at home forever. One is now pregnant - it sounds like a horror story.

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A lot of my friends from university moved back to their parents house after graduation, most only for a few months until they got sorted with house shares or moved in with partners, but for some it lasted until they were almost 30.

One example would be a friend who is a teacher, she graduated in 2002 and got a job working in St Albans. She spent the next 6 or 7 years moving between short term rents with friends, her own rental flat and eventually her parents home. Living at her parents home she could pay a rent to cover her parents costs (although they hated her paying anything) and save about £800 a month on rent and bills. Doing this for 3 years meant she saved enough for a deposit for when she and her boyfriend got married.

I quite like the idea of selling our house, my parents house, the inlaws house and my wife's grans house and buying a mansion to divide into apartments. Inter-generational living (with strict rules/boundaries) is the way ahead!

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The costs are simply too high both for renting and buying. But if you want high house prices that's the price we pay.

The whole system economy is unsustainable, living expenses are too high.

Correct....our population has increased faster than the homes built, homes that have been built are smaller and inferior....fewer living wage paid jobs, more and more minimum wage jobs and part time work....better education and qualifications for worse career prospects.

More loft and garage extensions, more mobile homes, more people owing more than one property and more and more never getting the opportunity to ever own one........they call it unsustainable progress. :blink:

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That can't be right.

Can it?

I does sound very high but, at work, of the born-and-bred locals it's probably more than half of 20-somethings living at home. The idea of 'wasting' 350 to rent a room in a grubby HMO when it's so much nicer at Mum's doesn't seem to appeal to them. I see their point but I haven't lived at home properly since I was 18 - even living in a slum I felt I was living a life of sorts, not answerable to anyone.

Edited by CrashedOutAndBurned

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I'm mightily relieved and very, very thankful that my son is about to receive a 200k+ payout from his grandfather's estate otherwise I would despair of him ever leaving home even though he's earning reasonable money as an electrician.

He's 28 and really needs to be in his own place but like so many others he wouldn't have been able to buy without this legacy and we have the highest rents outside of London where we live. Evenso just when I thought he'd be off like a shot, no; I've educated him too well over house prices and he says he's going to wait maybe a couple of years before buying and he does so like to save he's not going to rent in the meantime either but stay at home :angry: so it looks like I've got the pleasure of his company plus g/friend part of the time for a long while yet :o

Apologies for punctuation, I never did get the proper hang of it at school :ph34r:

Edited by Solitaire

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the ponzi has finally run out of suckers.

Well.............. This is why the CML [Council of Mortgage Lenders Liars] are fighting to the death for the continuance of

PREDATORY LIAR LOANS;

THEY are what got the whole hpi thing going - and what KEPT it going.......

Edited by eric pebble

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So what? They aren't going up either.

Way I see it, is rather than using my capital to buy a house, which means I would no longer have much of an opportunity to diversify, continuously rebalance and grow that fund at 20% or more per annum, I'll rent on the cheap and be well placed either way.

If they crash, I'll really be in the money, which I think over the next 3-4 years will happen. I don't expect 40% off next year, but I'm happy betting on 20% or more in 4 years.

By which time i'll have doubled my deposit and will be in a position to buy somewhere decent outright (I'm talking a 3/4 bed detached rather than a hovel). Or, if we still have incredibly volatile financial markets, maybe I'll continue to rent as the markets are effectively paying me to do so.

Thats pretty much guaranteed if current rates of inflation hold out.

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I'm mightily relieved and very, very thankful that my son is about to receive a 200k+ payout from his grandfather's estate otherwise I would despair of him ever leaving home even though he's earning reasonable money as an electrician.

He's 28 and really needs to be in his own place but like so many others he wouldn't have been able to buy without this legacy and we have the highest rents outside of London where we live. Evenso just when I thought he'd be off like a shot, no; I've educated him too well over house prices and he says he's going to wait maybe a couple of years before buying and he does so like to save he's not going to rent in the meantime either but stay at home :angry: so it looks like I've got the pleasure of his company plus g/friend part of the time for a long while yet :o

Apologies for punctuation, I never did get the proper hang of it at school :ph34r:

Let's just hope inflation/devaluation and/or bank collapse don't destroy his wealth while he's waiting for the collapse! He definitely needs to spilt it 4 ways, 50k into different banking institutions, so it's covered by the FSCS. But, if I were him I'd be putting at least 10% in physical gold bullion, otherwise the chances are he'll end up being very sorry in a couple of years time.

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I'm mightily relieved and very, very thankful that my son is about to receive a 200k+ payout from his grandfather's estate otherwise I would despair of him ever leaving home even though he's earning reasonable money as an electrician.

[..]

he does so like to save he's not going to rent in the meantime either but stay at home :angry: so it looks like I've got the pleasure of his company plus g/friend part of the time for a long while yet :o

When he gets the £200k, why not up the rent? :)

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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