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Bad Weather Gdp Sweepstake Indicator

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So we've got a bit of snow, no other country on the planet gets it as bad as us. So will the snow now be blamed for poor Q4 GDP figures.

The country is coming to a standstill no one will be spending anything so what will happen to GDP and will the snow get the blame?

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Could this be reason for house price falls? Is there any way we can pin the recent sustained falls on poor weather... perhaps accurate long range forecasting is to blame, keeping those prospective punters sitting at home by the fire rather than trawling through estate agent windows? ;)

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All public transport in South Yorkshire has been cancelled. Snow is being measured in ft.

Yep I know, seen cars stuck on Herries Road near the NGH, wheels spinning going no where. It's going to cause major problems for the snow ploughs when they hit the roads.

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We're completely snowed in, no chance of getting to work, shops, or anywhere else. The world doesn't stop - yet. It also shows the error of those who believe a national holiday for a royal wedding is an economic disaster. If we get another month of the white stuff, that will be an economic disaster.

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We're completely snowed in, no chance of getting to work, shops, or anywhere else. The world doesn't stop - yet. It also shows the error of those who believe a national holiday for a royal wedding is an economic disaster. If we get another month of the white stuff, that will be an economic disaster.

Where are you ?

I'm in East Yorkshire.

I didn't even try and get to the office today.

Gonna pop out for a walk though soon.

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I saw a small shrub poking out the top of some snow and mistook it for damned twigs in a vase. If other people make the same mistake, it may raise the value of this entire country significantly.

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Where are you ?

I'm in East Yorkshire.

West Yorks, Pennine hills. We had a foot of snow the night before last and there's a blizzard as I look out the window. The gritters have given up. When I've done this morning's work I'll take a rucksack for an hour's walk to the shops.

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The country is coming to a standstill no one will be spending anything so what will happen to GDP and will the snow get the blame?

Don't forget the Royal wedding, everyone gets to do nothing that day too.

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Don't forget the Royal wedding, everyone gets to do nothing that day too.

I'm sure a few million Royal souvenir knick-knacks sold will make up the difference.

Mind you, they'll be made in China so GDP will be up but the balance of payments will suffer !

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1334890/UK-snow-40-workers-day-countrys-transport-paralysed.html

Britain: 40% of workers take the day off as snow storms paralyse the country... with more to come tonight

# 300 passengers spend night on train stranded between London & Brighton

# Forecasters say there's another EIGHT INCHES to come today

# Gatwick and Edinburgh airports closed for a second day

# Transport chief admits 'no excuses' for lack of grit on roads

# Teenage girl breaks pelvis in sledging accident

# Empty shelves at food stores as severe weather hits deliveries

Panic buying already. Excellent.

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No pay for snow absence from work

Has the snow and ice kept you off work today? A weather-enforced absence can be a blessing or a curse, the difference often being a simple question of cash. If you're lucky, your employer may turn a blind eye and continue paying you. If not, you may have to foot the bill for your absence through lost earnings.

After the harsh winters of recent years, many people have already found to their cost that an employer is not obliged to pay you if you cannot make it into work for weather-related reasons unless it is written into your contract. A survey by the Federation of Small Businesses during the bad weather earlier this year showed one in seven of its members' staff failed to make it into work during the snow.

Good employers will already have "bad weather" policies in place and will have told their workforce what is expected of them in such circumstances. A lucky few may be able to circumvent the problem by working from home, but for most it is simply not practical.

If your workplace is closed, on the other hand, there should be no question of you not being paid, assuming you were ready and willing to work but prevented from doing so by the employer itself. However, if certain functions of a business are halted by weather, you may be asked to work time-in-lieu at a later date. This is a policy enforced by Ocado with regard to its drivers who have been unable to complete their grocery delivery rounds this week.

The TUC urges employers to show compassion if workers cannot travel to work. "In many parts of the country the advice from the police is not to travel unless journeys are absolutely necessary," says TUC general secretary Brendan Barber. "It would be very unfair if an employer decided to dock pay from staff who failed to make it in because of the snow."

Through its workSMART campaign, the TUC also wants employers to rethink traditional 9 to 5 working patterns where possible and make use of available technology, so all parties can avoid disruption from what seems an increasingly common problem.

Some big employers have come up with innovative solutions. Sainsbury's and Tesco, for example, both offer snow-restricted employees the option of reporting for duty at their nearest store, if getting to the one where they usually work proves impossible. However if this is not possible then both, like Ocado, expect employees to either work back the lost hours in lieu, or else deduct them from holiday allowance or a pay packet.

• Have you been forced to stay at home today? If so, what stance is your employer taking? And is it reasonable that employers should not pay staff who can neither get to the office nor work from home?

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Cold weather 'threatening small businesses'

The continuing snow and icy weather conditions are jeopardising the future of hundreds of small businesses across the UK, business groups have warned.

The Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) told the BBC as many as 800-900 small businesses were under threat as a result of the cold snap.

Businesses where cashflow is vital, such as bars and restaurants, are really suffering, it said.

The Federation of Small Businesses said members were "particularly hard-hit".

Estimates vary widely about the full extent of the overall cost to the UK economy of the cold weather.

Douglas McWilliams, chief executive of the CEBR, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that about one-fifth of the economy had been affected, costing about £1bn every day.

However, Chris Gorman at the Forum for Private Business put the figure at nearer £250m, with 10% of the workforce being affected.

'On the brink'

Some industries will suffer a temporary hit, analysts say. For example, construction projects will be put on hold until the weather improves. This is precisely what happened during the cold spell in January this year.

But other sectors, particularly retail and leisure, could lose out on business entirely, with potentially severe consequences for some small businesses.

"Quite a lot of small businesses are quite close to the brink now," said Mr McWilliams.

"I think at least a few hundred, maybe as many as 800 or 900, could go bankrupt that otherwise wouldn't have because this is the straw that breaks the camel's back."

He said businesses that rely on cash were particularly vulnerable.

"If a restaurant loses a night's business, it's not going to get it back," he said.

Well prepared

The Federation of Small Business said it was "disappointed that we still haven't learnt the lessons from previous bad weather and that the country has yet again ground to a halt".

However, it said small businesses were better prepared for this cold snap than those in previous years.

It said that four in 10 of its members had made arrangements in advance for staff to work from home, three in 10 were offering flexible working hours and almost one in five had bought their own supply of grit to clear shopfronts and the roads outside their premises.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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