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Pole

The Century Of The Self

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This four part BBC documentary (2002) should be watched by everyone who wants to understand the world economy, politics and our society a little bit better.

The documentary shows how by employing the tactics of psychoanalysis, politicians appeal to irrational, primitive impulses that have little apparent bearing on issues outside of the narrow self-interest of a consumer population. He cites Paul Mazur, a Wall Street banker working for Lehman Brothers in the 1930s: "We must shift America from a needs- to a desires-culture. People must be trained to desire, to want new things, even before the old have been entirely consumed. [...] Man's desires must overshadow his needs."

It's been published on GoogleVideo (links below).

I've watched it three times and keep returning.

Enjoy!

Part 1:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6718420906413643126#

Part 2:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-678466363224520614#

Edited by Pole

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Blimey, just on the first one but the economic parallels between the problems now and the 20s crash are amazing, never realised the Wall Street crash occurred because the mood that built the boom was "it's different this time", seeing the riots etc caused by austerity measures genuinely gave me the shivers

From Wikipedia:

"The crash followed a speculative boom that had taken hold in the late 1920s, which had led hundreds of thousands of Americans to invest heavily in the stock market. A significant number of them were borrowing money to buy more stocks. By August 1929, brokers were routinely lending small investors more than two thirds of the face value of the stocks they were buying. Over $8.5 billion was out on loan,[4] more than the entire amount of currency circulating in the U.S. at the time.[5] The rising share prices encouraged more people to invest; people hoped the share prices would rise further. Speculation thus fueled further rises and created an economic bubble. Because of margin buying, investors stood to lose large sums of money if the market turned down—or even failed to advance quickly enough. The average P/E (price to earnings) ratio of S&P Composite stocks was 32.6 in September 1929,[6] clearly above historical norms. Most economists view this event as the most dramatic in modern economic history. On October 24, 1929, with the Dow just past its September 3 peak of 381.17, the market finally turned down, and panic selling started."

Sounds eerily familiar!

Thanks for posting this!

Edited by madpenguin

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Other videos to look out for:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_Nightmares

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trap_%28television_documentary_series%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandora%27s_Box_%28television_documentary_series%29

I have watched them all.

I have only got a rather poor copy of 'The Century Of The Self' from tinternet.

I don't think it was put out on DVD format due to copyright of some of the sources used for the programmes.

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This four part BBC documentary (2002) should be watched by everyone who wants to understand the world economy, politics and our society a little bit better.

The documentary shows how by employing the tactics of psychoanalysis, politicians appeal to irrational, primitive impulses that have little apparent bearing on issues outside of the narrow self-interest of a consumer population. He cites Paul Mazur, a Wall Street banker working for Lehman Brothers in the 1930s: "We must shift America from a needs- to a desires-culture. People must be trained to desire, to want new things, even before the old have been entirely consumed. [...] Man's desires must overshadow his needs

In Part 1, Bernaise is credited as showing the American corporations how they could make people want things they didnt need, by linking mass produced goods to thier unconscious desires, and out of this rose the methods to control the masses......

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

However Agricola, a Roman General, who was credited [in the conquest of Britain] after suppressing Boudica's uprising in the year 61.

Began a policy of bringing the comforts of Roman civilization to the barbarous British to control the masses.

Tacitus, the son in law of Agricola, wrote of his policies:

'His object was to accustom them to a life of peace and quiet by the provision of amenities.

The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilization', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement.'

And I bet similiar methods were used in ancient antiquity, prior to recorded 'civilisation' and will also be used ten thousand years hence.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I think Ive seen this. Vaguely remember it. Will watch it again.

Edited by Dan1

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Anyone with a brain should be watching the series 'American Dream' on BBC2 now.

S'that why youre on here? :P

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Anyone with a brain should be watching the series 'American Dream' on BBC2 now.

was but got bored, just seemed like an excuse to use some old home movies. What was the point i missed?

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In Part 1, Bernaise is credited as showing the American corporations how they could make people want things they didnt need, by linking mass produced goods to thier unconscious desires, and out of this rose the methods to control the masses......

No, no - you must keep repeating....it's a free market and you have a choice.....

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In Part 1, Bernaise is credited as showing the American corporations how they could make people want things they didnt need, by linking mass produced goods to thier unconscious desires, and out of this rose the methods to control the masses......

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

However Agricola, a Roman General, who was credited [in the conquest of Britain] after suppressing Boudica's uprising in the year 61.

Began a policy of bringing the comforts of Roman civilization to the barbarous British to control the masses.

Tacitus, the son in law of Agricola, wrote of his policies:

'His object was to accustom them to a life of peace and quiet by the provision of amenities.

The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilization', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement.'

And I bet similiar methods were used in ancient antiquity, prior to recorded 'civilisation' and will also be used ten thousand years hence.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I think Ive seen this. Vaguely remember it. Will watch it again.

It's nice to cross the channel a couple of times a year for a puff of UK consumerism but even nicer to leave the consequences of consumption to those who have gorged themselves in search of fake sunshine in favour of the real thing.

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This is a must watch for everyone wishing to understand the mad world we live in. Many pieces of the puzzle here.

Thank you very much for posting.

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Blimey, just on the first one but the economic parallels between the problems now and the 20s crash are amazing, never realised the Wall Street crash occurred because the mood that built the boom was "it's different this time", seeing the riots etc caused by austerity measures genuinely gave me the shivers

From Wikipedia:

"The crash followed a speculative boom that had taken hold in the late 1920s, which had led hundreds of thousands of Americans to invest heavily in the stock market. A significant number of them were borrowing money to buy more stocks. By August 1929, brokers were routinely lending small investors more than two thirds of the face value of the stocks they were buying. Over $8.5 billion was out on loan,[4] more than the entire amount of currency circulating in the U.S. at the time.[5] The rising share prices encouraged more people to invest; people hoped the share prices would rise further. Speculation thus fueled further rises and created an economic bubble. Because of margin buying, investors stood to lose large sums of money if the market turned down—or even failed to advance quickly enough. The average P/E (price to earnings) ratio of S&P Composite stocks was 32.6 in September 1929,[6] clearly above historical norms. Most economists view this event as the most dramatic in modern economic history. On October 24, 1929, with the Dow just past its September 3 peak of 381.17, the market finally turned down, and panic selling started."

Sounds eerily familiar!

Thanks for posting this!

Gearing is a killer, the more it is used - especially when it becomes endemic then the system will fail. Concetration of this debt into specific areas is even worse. Central bankers that say bubles cannot be detected/countered are liars, they are in many cases fountains of the bubbles themselves.

If you want to look at another parallel with the 30's check out earnings differntials - another sure sign that there is trouble in the system.

The housing bubble was intentionally stocked to hide the consequences of the tech bubble. The banks shifted from selling tech syndicated loans to mortgage backed trash - keeping the fees and bonuses going.

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2002/mar2002/lec2-m15.shtml

The World Economic Crisis: 1991-2001

“Between 1996 and 2001, banks lent $890 billion in syndicated loans, according to Thomson Financial. Another $415 billion of debt was provided by the bond markets and $500 billion was raised from private equity and stock market issues. Still more came from profitable blue-chips that drive themselves to the brink of bankruptcy or beyond, in the belief that an explosive expansion of internet use would create almost infinite demand for telecoms capacity.

“The global financial system became addicted to fuelling this bonfire. Nearly half of European bank lending in 1999 was to telecoms companies. Moody’s, the credit agency, estimates that about 80 percent of all the high-yield, or ‘junk’, bonds issued in the US at the height of the boom were to telecoms operators. Five of the 10 largest mergers or acquisitions in history involved telecoms companies during the boom.

http://www.interesting-people.org/archives/interesting-people/200109/msg00044.html

Glorious hopes on a trillion-dollar scrapheap

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So if (from the first video) cigarettes were originally seen as very much a symbol of freedom for women then I guess that the clamp down on smoking in recent years will have had its own symbology for people in general that the clamping downers would have been well aware of.

Reinforcing the sheeple do as you're told psychology.

Health issues aside.

Edited by billybong

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And if they were prepared to use subliminal symbology of cigarettes on women it's likely that on the same basis the prohibition of alcohol at about the same time (the 1920s) was used for some level of symbology to eventually increase sales and to manipulate eventual total consumption. Perhaps with some social engineering thrown in as well just for good luck.

Edited by billybong

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While the "We will force you to be free" episode of "The Trap" was good, also liked "The lonely robot" episode that was in the links on YouTube as it's very focused on New Labour and Tony Blair in particular.

Just shows what the little S@$# thought of us

Edited by madpenguin

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Thanks for posting these, Pole. Outstanding documentaries. I knew we were manipulated and controlled, but to that extent!

Those documentaries should give us more strength to go our own way.

And by that I mean we should become less materialistic and start fulfilling our real needs instead of fulfilling fake needs planted in our heads by PR specialists.

The only way out is to opt out of consumerism.

It's hard but certainly doable, step by step - no latest cars, no latest TVs, no latest gadgets, no trips to shopping centres every weekend.

Instead of that more human interactions, more conversations, more books and more quality time with your loved ones.

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Those documentaries should give us more strength to go our own way.

And by that I mean we should become less materialistic and start fulfilling our real needs instead of fulfilling fake needs planted in our heads by PR specialists.

The only way out is to opt out of consumerism.

It's hard but certainly doable, step by step - no latest cars, no latest TVs, no latest gadgets, no trips to shopping centres every weekend.

Instead of that more human interactions, more conversations, more books and more quality time with your loved ones.

He has his critics, and his well edited films can be subjective, but Adam Curtis is one of the best (and last) documentary film makers around. Not seen all of the Century of the Self yet, so thanks for posting. I’ve often linked snippets of The Trap on this forum, very informative.

He must be due another series out soon.

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The only way out is to opt out of consumerism.

Which was where we were heading mid to late nineties before the phantom crack up 'boom'. Not even the dot com crash could stop them. Ignorance can be bliss, but invariably invites oblivion eventually.

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  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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