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The Renter

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Despite the predictably negative take on it from the Illustrator, someone here has written a nice piece on the renting/buying thing:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/nov/27/what-really-thinking-renter

Edit: It appears in the Weekend magazine section of todays paper

The majority of people, when they find out you are a renter, will adopt a superior or patronising tone. I've never quite understood this; the only thing home ownership has conveyed to me over the past decade is a willingness to take on irresponsible and exorbitant levels of debt.
Four short and sweet paras, classic in simply stating it as it is. :)

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I think this is probably the only time in history when an average working person has not been able to afford to buy a house

I didn't get past this sentence, because reading this I realised the writer isn't very knowledgeable and there was no point carrying on.

In 1900 only 11% of the population were owner occupiers. So it would be more accurate to say that the second half of the 20th century, when over half the population were owner occupiers, was the historic blip. At the moment UK owner occupancy rates are falling, my guess is they'll keep falling even as house prices fall.

Houses will become cheaper in real terms, but tighter credit will mean they're still unachievable for most people. We regard this as paradoxical and perverse, but all our ancestors would have shrugged and thought it quite normal.

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I didn't get past this sentence, because reading this I realised the writer isn't very knowledgeable and there was no point carrying on.

In 1900 only 11% of the population were owner occupiers. So it would be more accurate to say that the second half of the 20th century, when over half the population were owner occupiers, was the historic blip. At the moment UK owner occupancy rates are falling, my guess is they'll keep falling even as house prices fall.

Houses will become cheaper in real terms, but tighter credit will mean they're still unachievable for most people. We regard this as paradoxical and perverse, but all our ancestors would have shrugged and thought it quite normal.

by this same argument all technological improvements are historic blips and we will soon revert back to the norm of travelling by paddle steamer.

the social improvements seen over the last 100 years have been dramatic and we are seeing a reversal of those improvements with a move towards the third world model of pockets of fantastic wealth surrounded by oceans of poverty. my guess is in the next 10 to 20 years we will see a redistribution of that wealth again and an advancement of social progress again. most likely due to the destruction of the central banks.

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by this same argument all technological improvements are historic blips and we will soon revert back to the norm of travelling by paddle steamer.

the social improvements seen over the last 100 years have been dramatic and we are seeing a reversal of those improvements with a move towards the third world model of pockets of fantastic wealth surrounded by oceans of poverty. my guess is in the next 10 to 20 years we will see a redistribution of that wealth again and an advancement of social progress again. most likely due to the destruction of the central banks.

Through war. Like last time.

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Through war. Like last time.

You could be right, but I am not convinced the wars did not actually dampen the impacts of social revolution. 1914 got rid of a lot of potential revolutionaries in the UK, which was heading for serious political problems.

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You could be right, but I am not convinced the wars did not actually dampen the impacts of social revolution. 1914 got rid of a lot of potential revolutionaries in the UK, which was heading for serious political problems.

Nah it depends on who is in power. If labour is in power tory voters get sent out to die and asked to rush the enemy machine guns. if Tories are in power poor people are conscripted out to rush the enemy machine guns. Either way if you are not useful to the government you will be sent to rush the machine guns. With 95 years of machine gun tech and 1 million round a minute guns that exist today, it will be a method to cull the unwanted in society.

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by this same argument all technological improvements are historic blips and we will soon revert back to the norm of travelling by paddle steamer.

M shaped societies are pretty normal.

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You could be right, but I am not convinced the wars did not actually dampen the impacts of social revolution. 1914 got rid of a lot of potential revolutionaries in the UK, which was heading for serious political problems.

When I studied history this was my field, and the question is a vexed one.

I think the ruling elite saw what happened in the USSR and got their act together in a traditional British fashion, handing certain powers to the people while retaining as much as they could. Churchill, and the nascent welfare state and votes for women was the embodiment of this.

The damn burst after WWII tho.

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M shaped societies are pretty normal.

... when your society hasn't progressed past subsistence farming technologically. When 99% of labour is needed to grow food, it's no surprise that most people are poor. Industrialised countries like the UK have a large capital base geared towards mass production of food and manufactured goods. Mass production is not much good to elites: why would they want 4,000 plasma screens sat in their garage? Mass production implies a more even distribution of income than subsistence farming.

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... when your society hasn't progressed past subsistence farming technologically. When 99% of labour is needed to grow food, it's no surprise that most people are poor. Industrialised countries like the UK have a large capital base geared towards mass production of food and manufactured goods. Mass production is not much good to elites: why would they want 4,000 plasma screens sat in their garage? Mass production implies a more even distribution of income than subsistence farming.

Very well put

Mass production is anathema to exclusivity

It's a pity we can't produce everything of value, though

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  • 277 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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