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ralphmalph

Interesting Interactive Graph Of Debt And Banks In Europe

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http://www.dbresearch.com/servlet/reweb2.ReWEB?rwnode=DBR_INTERNET_EN-PROD$NAVIGATION&rwobj=FLASHMAP_EUROBANKING.calias&rwsite=DBR_INTERNET_EN-PROD

Banking sector loans as a percentage of GDP, loans vs deposits, bad loan percentage. All you ever wanted to know.

Edit: Tip to use click on country name then when you select the stat you want a nice graph(s) appears at the bottom.

Edited by ralphmalph

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That has Lithuania as the highest % of non performing loans in 2009. It seems this has continued and they are proposing banks only

get the resale price which is a really good idea.

VILNIUS, Nov 4 (Reuters) - Lithuania's parliament on Thursday began a debate on a bill that could limit banks ability to recover loans if borrowers default on mortgage payments.

Nordic banks, such as SEB and Swedbank were badly hit last year by a rise in bad loans in the Baltic region as economies shrank by double digit amounts.

Parliament is considering changing the law so that banks would only get the money raised from selling real estate from borrowers the banks had foreclosed on, even if this were less than the outstanding loan.

Currently, banks can claim other assets to make up the difference.

"Today banks suffer no loss in any case ... while debts are being passed on to children and grandchildren," opposition lawmaker Valentinas Mazuronis, who supported the proposal, said.

The amendment was backed both by opposition and ruling coalition members after the first reading, however some lawmakers warned it may lead to a rise in interest rates on loans.

"Of course, borrowing in the future would become more expensive, as banks would demand to have more own capital in respect to property being mortgaged," Stasys Kropas, the head of Lithuanian banks association, told Reuters.

Residential real estate prices in the country's five biggest cities have dropped about 40 percent from a peak in end-2007, Ober-Haus, the largest real estate agency in Lithuania, said.

The drop left many with mortgages that exceeded their property's market value.

In the third quarter, nearly 20 percent of banks' 59.1 billion litas ($24.2 billion) in lending in Lithuania was either impaired or borrowers were late with their payments, the central bank said.

The parliament plans to have a second reading in December. ($1=2.441 Lithuanian Litas) (Reporting by Nerijus Adomaitis; Editing by Jon Loades-Carter)

Fomr forexpros.com http://www.forexpros.com/news/interest-rates-news/lithuania-mulls-limits-to-banks-rights-in-foreclosure-172044

Edit: Ireland may be linked

Irish Bank Shares Sink on Dilution Fears‎

Wall Street Journal - David Enrich

The Irish banks strayed far from their domestic mission during the now-collapsed real-estate boom, funding lavish commercial-property ventures and

home loans abroad. Now, the banks could see a variety of their far-flung operations on the chopping block, according to government and industry officials.

That could include dumping operations such as a partnership with the U.K. Post Office and a mortgage-lending company in Lithuania

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704243904575630641660021192.html

:blink:

AIB Bank to acquire mortgage lending business in Baltic republics of Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia

By Finfacts Team

Jun 29, 2007 - 1:04:00 PM

http://www.finfacts.ie/irishfinancenews/article_1010473.shtml

Riga, capital of Latvia

AIB Bank announced today that it has entered into an agreement to acquire AmCredit, the mortgage finance business of the Baltic-American Enterprise Fund (BalAEF).

The business, which has a strong track record in mortgage lending, operates in Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia. It was established in 1997.

BalAEF is a Delaware corporation chartered in 1994, pursuant to legislation enacted by the U.S. Congress to promote private sector development in the Baltic States.

The International Finance Corporation (the private sector arm of the World Bank Group) has played an important role in its development over the years.

AmCredit, which has 13 outlets and 145 staff, will give AIB entry to three high growth markets underpinned by an experienced workforce, robust systems and processes and an established brand.

The consideration for the transaction, which will comprise both up-front and earn-out components, is expected to be in the order of �40m.

AmCredit currently operates as a single product mortgage business.

Edited by northwestsmith2

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That has Lithuania as the highest % of non performing loans in 2009. It seems this has continued and they are proposing banks only

get the resale price which is a really good idea.

Fomr forexpros.com http://www.forexpros...eclosure-172044

Edit: Ireland may be linked

:blink:

Funnily enough non performing debt was the first drop down I went for.

1 Lithuania 19.3%

2 Latvia 16.4%

3 Romania 15.3%

4 Ireland 9%

5 Greece 7.7%

6 Poland 7.6%

7 Italy 7.0%

8 Hungary 6.7%

9 Bulgaria 6.4%

10 Slovakia 5.3%

11 Estonia 5.2%

12 Spain 5.1%

13 Czech Rep 4.6%

14 France 3.6%

15 UK 3.5%

Clearly we only ever engaged in prudent lending in the UK and it is a vicious lie that low interest rates are keeping the over borrowed afloat.

Spain , the UK not to be seen in the top 10????:blink:

Edited by Mikhail Liebenstein

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Funnily enough non performing debt was the first drop down I went for.

Clearly we only ever engaged in prudent lending in the UK and it is a vicious lie that low interest rates are keeping the over borrowed afloat.

Spain , the UK not to be seen in the top 10????:blink:

Seeing that land registry chart the UK market is just living off itself like you say low interest rates and sale numbers collapsed for properties under

200K. Not sure why Lithuania is getting defaults, they have low rents, high levels of renting and pro tenancy so it could be foreign investors and a smaller

market of buyers. Rents never got caught up for some reason.

Edited by northwestsmith2

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Clearly we only ever engaged in prudent lending in the UK and it is a vicious lie that low interest rates are keeping the over borrowed afloat.

Spain , the UK not to be seen in the top 10????:blink:

Not exactly.. we are probably just the only country where the government pays the mortgage of those who don't perform. I wonder what level our would be if you took away mortgage support..

[Edit to add: Great find by the way Ralph, thanks for sharing]

Edited by libspero

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Not exactly.. we are probably just the only country where the government pays the mortgage of those who don't perform. I wonder what level our would be if you took away mortgage support..

[Edit to add: Great find by the way Ralph, thanks for sharing]

Is this just real estate lending, or is consumer debt included?

There's alot of UK consumer debt being paid off through debt management plans at token rates, well below accruing interest. Common to find £60k of credit cards being carried at £100 per month. I guess the creditors don't have to report that as non-performing. Anyone know?

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The non-performing loans plots mostly cut off at 2008.

Lots of water under the bridge since then.

Yes the Baltic areas look terrible. But as I suggested on another thread, the IMF may not really care if they payback or not. This is America's cold war warriors buying allies/reverse-engineering the iron curtain. That was always the deal between NATO and the expanded EU.

I think the old East European countries can be discounted. Oooops . . . an unintentional pun :lol:

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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