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juvenal

Postal Scam In Operation Now.

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A card comes through your lettbox from PDS (Parcel delivery Service) concerning an undelivered package. It asks you to ring a number.

Don't!!

Calling this number means being billed for £315, yes - £315. Scam is coming from Belize and has been confirmed by Royal Mail.

I was notified of it by a major London financial firm.

Please pass info on.

Edited by juvenal

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http://blogs.mirror.co.uk/investigations/2010/11/pds-parcel-scam-has-been-sent.html

Each Christmas rumours circulate that an old scam has come back to life.

It concerns conmen trading as PDS Parcel Delivery who leave cards saying you should contact them on 0906 6611911 to arrange delivery of a (non-existent) package.

This line costs £1.50 a minute and was registered to crooks hiding behind an accommodation address in Belize, Central America.

The important word here is "was". This scam was shutdown by the watchdog for premium rate phone services in 2005. This phone number is no longer in use. Although rumours of this scam re-surface each Christmas, it is no longer running (at least, not with this number).

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Meanwhile an old man in a carpark in Devon was found to be charging visitors to the local attractions £3 for the use of the car park. When he left, Council leaders found they had no record of him and realised he had never worked for the Council but was pocketing... blah blah blah

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Meanwhile an old man in a carpark in Devon was found to be charging visitors to the local attractions £3 for the use of the car park. When he left, Council leaders found they had no record of him and realised he had never worked for the Council but was pocketing... blah blah blah

You sound like you've been watching 'Greg the Bunny'

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I had a card from a courier today, and in what looked like, but clearly wasnt, hand written message to say the parcel was across the Road at the neighbours.

Imagine my surprise when my neighbour came to the door in her neglige, and guess what...no parcel...How we laughed.

Edited by Bloo Loo

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It was a semi-geniune warning about a known scam, but the details itself are a hoax.

There have been dozens of premium rate scams along these lines, but the £ was in reality a lot lower.

The £315 should have given this away as a hoax.

Personally, I think the government should either outlaw premium rate numbers or give people 3 months to query the bill, with any queried payments being withheld from the recipient. Currently, in a ridulcous situation, the company running the premium rate line gets the money straight away from your phone company and you have to sue premium rate company, who usually have vanished by then. The whole idea was always so wide open to fraud I was tempted to setup a premium rate company myself... and I see myself as an honest person. It really is that bad.

Edited by RufflesTheGuineaPig

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It was a semi-geniune warning about a known scam, but the details itself are a hoax.

There have been dozens of premium rate scams along these lines, but the £ was in reality a lot lower.

The £315 should have given this away as a hoax.

Personally, I think the government should either outlaw premium rate numbers or give people 3 months to query the bill, with any queried payments being withheld from the recipient. Currently, in a ridulcous situation, the company running the premium rate line gets the money straight away from your phone company and you have to sue premium rate company, who usually have vanished by then. The whole idea was always so wide open to fraud I was tempted to setup a premium rate company myself... and I see myself as an honest person. It really is that bad.

You've saved me writing a similar post. Yes, it was always wide open to fraud, and frustratingly, the frauds would always have been so easy to stop if the will had been there.

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I had a card from a courier today, and in what looked like, but clearly wasnt, hand written message to say the parcel was across the Road at the neighbours.

Imagine my surprise when my neighbour came to the door in her neglige, and guess what...no parcel...How we laughed.

Can i have my drill back Sid.....?

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All premium rate numbers should have a 10 second free intro along the lines of :

"this number will be charged at a rate of £x.xx per minute, to continue please press 3 now"

it would also prevent the redirect dial-up account scams.

There is in fact no legitimate reason for premium rate numbers.

Want to offer a phone service? Fine, provide a freephone number and take credit cards.

Premium rate text services are just as bad, if not worse.

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There is in fact no legitimate reason for premium rate numbers.

Want to offer a phone service? Fine, provide a freephone number and take credit cards.

Premium rate text services are just as bad, if not worse.

banks find it hard to issue card facilities these days.

Ive tried three banks, all agreed provided I provided security....went to paypal.

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British Telecom tried a similar thing.

A card arrives through the letter box with a message saying call this number to pick up the package.

When you call, it turns out it is their new phone package, no actual delivery. Just a sales con.

After BT tried to blackmail me with a bad credit report and debt collectors when trying to collect £6 I didn't owe (their incompetence), I decided never to use them again. The amount of marketing rubbish I still get from them is rubbish although the rabbits like peeing on it after its been shredded.

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Sometimes there's a lot of dogma and prejudice here.

There are perfectly valid uses for premium rate numbers. For example, a professional person who charges clients by the hour can use it to charge by the exact time spent with his client, and save on all the overhead of keeping records. Has the added bonus that it doesn't penalise honesty, or unduly reward the awkward client who makes hundreds of calls each individually too brief to be bothered to record.

I've seriously considered it for precisely that purpose myself. Indeed, I may go for it, now my steady job is ended.

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I had previously thought of setting up a premium rate number, putting it on the back of my car with a "HOW'S MY DRIVING? CALL 0906xxxxxx" sticker, drive everywhere like a complete tw*t, and the resulting irate calls should generate enough revenue to cover any fines or insurance claims and still make a profit.....

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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