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New Year Train Fare Rises

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Car insurance up too. VAT to 20% in the new year, noticing much more than the official 4.5% RPI inflation on food and drink in the supermarket. Can you hear the sucking sound of disposable income being pulled out of the economy. Stagflationary depression here we come.

Edited by General Congreve

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With all this deflation looks like they'll have to cut interest rates again. Anyone for 0.1%-0.25% ??

Don't stop there though .... Better print up a load more cash too, to help people cope with all these deflationary price rises.

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glad I cycle to work. If i choose not to cycle any particular day, it costs GBP16.20 to be squashed on a train and then the tube for an hour

I have cycled more this this year, too. It's a triple-win: cheaper, healthier, and faster.

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Essentially it's a pay cut of several hundred quid a year for anyone with a season ticket... I just checked and an annual season ticket from Swindon to Zone 1 is already over £7,000.

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Essentially it's a pay cut of several hundred quid a year for anyone with a season ticket... I just checked and an annual season ticket from Swindon to Zone 1 is already over £7,000.

That is nuts. It's like being in a lose-lose situation. You spend your life squashed on very expensive commuter train to work long hours in the city, then come home to Swindon. What is wrong with people?

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hmm... another above inflation rise... how can next year be better than this if we are seeing prices rise more quickly than inflation... madness.

How can unemployment not be higher, how can the Eaton boys not get the blame for this... worrying times... especially if Spain folds in the new year... if Spain goes we are in a depression my friends....

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Apart from taking some cash out of the system, it's not really going to have an overall effect on house prices. Places like Swindon and Ipswich (where I live) will see prices go down quite a bit more, and places closer to London like Reading and Chelmsford will hold the value better.

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Why can't we just keep speculation and profit away from the basic essentials in life?

A bit of a roof over ones head, affordable energy, and a decent and affordable transport system to get us around our small island aren't much to ask.

Speculators, bankers and businesses can make money in so many ways, why not just keep these basics for the people without allowing businesses to price them to breaking point.

Sigh. Train prices make my blood boil more than house prices ever did.

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Why can't we just keep speculation and profit away from the basic essentials in life?

A bit of a roof over ones head, affordable energy, and a decent and affordable transport system to get us around our small island aren't much to ask.

Speculators, bankers and businesses can make money in so many ways, why not just keep these basics for the people without allowing businesses to price them to breaking point.

Sigh. Train prices make my blood boil more than house prices ever did.

Because we don't create enough wealth fundamentally. We have to fight it out, lie, cheat steal in the rat race, for that last grain of rice...

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Stories like this remind me that things are quite dire in the UK. While in the EU and USA inflation is well below target and trending down, giving them all the room in the world to print as problems arise.. In the UK we are already above target.

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Does this mean I don't have to subsidise the train as much? Always thought it was ridicules that I was being tax to subsidise people that earned a lot more money than me in the city.

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Stories like this remind me that things are quite dire in the UK. While in the EU and USA inflation is well below target and trending down, giving them all the room in the world to print as problems arise.. In the UK we are already above target.

There's never any 'room to print'. Deflationary pressures come about because the market is trying to rebalance. Printing money to try to keep asset prices stupidly high is only ever going to result in massive cost of living inflation because in order to try to support higher order assets, the cost of lower order consumer goods must first be inflated to the heavens.

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Does this mean I don't have to subsidise the train as much? Always thought it was ridicules that I was being tax to subsidise people that earned a lot more money than me in the city.

The majority of workers have to earn more to pay the ridiculous rail fares...

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Does this mean I don't have to subsidise the train as much?

Take a wild guess. "Shifting the burden from the taxpayer to the passenger" just means increasing the burden on passengers while the taxpayer burden remains the same.

I don't think I've seen a single public spending figure that shows less pounds being spent on something next year than this one and I'd be amazed if this was any different.

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There's never any 'room to print'. Deflationary pressures come about because the market is trying to rebalance. Printing money to try to keep asset prices stupidly high is only ever going to result in massive cost of living inflation because in order to try to support higher order assets, the cost of lower order consumer goods must first be inflated to the heavens.

To give the US as an example there has been a huge, even historic decline in asset prices, while the basket of goods has remained about the same in price, over the last couple years.

Printing money to try to keep asset prices stupidly high, sounds like a very bad plan.

A question I have about the train fares going up.. where is the money going. Are the people who work in the trains, especially I am assuming the tremendously overstaffed bureaucracy getting generous pay increases and benefits? Are the contractors and their employees making more money? Are the private owners of the trains simply increasing fares because they can and seeing very large gains in profit?

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Does this mean I don't have to subsidise the train as much? Always thought it was ridicules that I was being tax to subsidise people that earned a lot more money than me in the city.

I'd agreed with you on almost anything else, but affordable transport infrastructure is almost as condusive to the national good as something like healthcare. If there is an argument

I don't use them as they are too expensive, but would like to and would have no objection to tax money going into them (not into the hands of private companies.)

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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