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Hpc As Counter Culture


cakehead
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I think anything that has some truth and meaning in it tends to survive, though in different forms. If you take Christianity for example, it started as millenarian movement expecting the imminent end of the world; when the 'event' failed to happen it got postponed indefinitely and finally (for liberal Christians, anyway) became a spiritual rather than physical millenium, happening right now rather than in some unspecified point in the future.

I think the HPC website/movement, whatever you want to call it, is going through a similar process, albeit in a much more condensed form.

HPC was the reverse of a doomsday cult, starting with a mild correction in houseprices with the 1990s as a worst case scenario and then

moved onto the collapse of the banking system and a depression not seen since WWII.

Which is where we are now.

Edited by northwestsmith2
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It is about protecting yourself and preparing yourself for the new way of living.....we saw that things were not quite as they should be, starting with a hidden unbalanced, manipulated market that we can all now start to see in it's full shameful glory.

“You don't know who's swimming naked until the tide goes out”. said warren buffet. ;)

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I'm looking for a solution.

I'm thinking of starting by developing a board game called the 'anti Monopoly' or 'Win Win'.

The aim of the game is for the players to stay in as long as possible and for their economies to develop as quickly as possible.

The players are given a board with a map of the world on it. They will be given populations, resources and will develop productive capacity. They will also be given some tokens which they can use to buy things from other countries or they can borrow other people's tokens if the owner wishes.

What the players have to do is to draw up a set of rules that will govern how they interact.

The 'team' that does the best wins.

Can't be hard can it?

Bags I alone get to lend everyone the tokens and charge them interest.

Anyone refusing to borrow tokens from me just can't play the game.

Well, we do want it to be a bit realistic, surely? :ph34r:

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Anywhere

Not with you old chap. If a man buys a two bedder in '97 for 50k, expecting to buy a three bed house in 2001 for 70k, only to find it costs £140,000, he's stuck. His house may have doubled in value theoretically but so has the place he aspires too. He could rent, but the cost saving is not sufficient to cover his outgoings and maintain the lifestyle he was careful to preserve with his original prudence. Plus there's no reason to assume the price trajectory is not going to continue and make his 140k dream a 280k nightmare six years later.

That's one reason why markets stagnate. It's not only FTBs who are unable to buy, home owners who'd move in other circumstances are equally banjaxed. He could have sold up in 2001 and moved to the US I suppose.

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Not with you old chap. If a man buys a two bedder in '97 for 50k, expecting to buy a three bed house in 2001 for 70k, only to find it costs £140,000, he's stuck. His house may have doubled in value theoretically but so has the place he aspires too. He could rent, but the cost saving is not sufficient to cover his outgoings and maintain the lifestyle he was careful to preserve with his original prudence. Plus there's no reason to assume the price trajectory is not going to continue and make his 140k dream a 280k nightmare six years later.

That's one reason why markets stagnate. It's not only FTBs who are unable to buy, home owners who'd move in other circumstances are equally banjaxed. He could have sold up in 2001 and moved to the US I suppose.

I know, I didn't start posting the proverbial yesterday :rolleyes:

There's always choices, depends whether you want to own an unsuitable for you asset or live the only life you're going to get.

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Speaking to agents, solicitors, mortgage brokers, family (as you might know I am looking around with offers) there is a ingrained mentality, STiLL, that if you buy a house, you do it up you make a profit, guaranteed.

Anything else. Like a possibility of another 20% drop, and they look at you as if you have three heads. A house is not a cash cow! Why can we be not be more creative and wealthier if we use other ways to generate "wealth"? It just smacks to me we are poorer country more than ever.

---

We should be called The three headed cult.

Edited by Money Spinner
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Not with you old chap. If a man buys a two bedder in '97 for 50k, expecting to buy a three bed house in 2001 for 70k, only to find it costs £140,000, he's stuck. His house may have doubled in value theoretically but so has the place he aspires too. He could rent, but the cost saving is not sufficient to cover his outgoings and maintain the lifestyle he was careful to preserve with his original prudence. Plus there's no reason to assume the price trajectory is not going to continue and make his 140k dream a 280k nightmare six years later.

That's one reason why markets stagnate. It's not only FTBs who are unable to buy, home owners who'd move in other circumstances are equally banjaxed. He could have sold up in 2001 and moved to the US I suppose.

I'm that nearly that man buying in early '99 and wanting to go up a bedroom but it's now nearly impossible. I'm kicking myself for being sensible and not liar loaning back in the day and going for that extra bed. In hindsight the difference was chicken feed. Many people are in my situation. The house I'm in may be my first and last house.

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Isn't that the situation now?

BTW I just don't buy into the 3x-salary-is-the-norm idea.

3x mortgages were present at a time when income tax was 33% and interest rates were 10%. Back then you probably couldn't afford anything higher even if they would lend it to you.

Now, with income tax as low as 20%, and interest rates more like 5%, it's not really comparable.

Unless the mortgage lender is sure that income tax and IRs will remain at the current rates for the next 20/25 years, probably best that they stick to a tried and tested multiple I'd have thought.

Edited by NEO72
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