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March of the Euro police: The shocking powers of prosecution the EU has over all of usBy Mary Ellen Synon

Last updated at 12:31 AM on 21st November 2010

Comments (37) Add to My Stories The man in charge: Europol Director Rob Wainwright, a Welsh-speaking former British civil servant

The full extent of the police and criminal prosecution powers that the European Union has over British citizens can be revealed today.

A Mail on Sunday investigation has uncovered an alarming array of new EU controls over justice and home affairs for which no one has voted, and most are unknown to the public.

These include:

Europol, the £60 million-a-year European criminal intelligence agency, whose officers have diplomatic immunity.

An 800-strong paramilitary police force called the European Gendarmerie Force.

The European Arrest Warrant, which now allows British citizens to be seized in the UK and sent without appeal to foreign jails for months or years without bail while awaiting trial.

Europol now has more than 650 officials at its headquarters in The Hague, from where it directs investigations across Europe.

When its Euro police officers are operating in the UK they have diplomatic immunity and cannot be touched by the British judiciary.

Europol’s director is Rob Wainwright, 43, a Welsh-speaking former British civil servant who joined Europol last year. He and his officials will move into a new £8.5 million building next year.

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Their official website even lists ‘Europol fictional appearances’, among them the film Ocean’s 12, in which Catherine Zeta-Jones plays a Europol agent.

MOS INVESTIGATION REVEALS THAT:

Europol’s officers have diplomatic immunity in UK and cannot be touched by our judges

An 800-strong paramilitary force has been trained and armed for ‘expeditionary’ missions

British citizens can be seized in UK and sent to foreign jails without appeal

The paramilitary police force has been trained in Italy and armed to be deployed as ‘an expeditionary police mission’ under military command if necessary.

The gendarmerie is not yet a full EU institution. However, its official purpose is ‘a consistent and co-ordinated deployment of EU police forces with a military status and full police powers. The EGF will be, first and foremost, at the disposal of the EU.’

Members are drawn from Italy, Spain, Portugal, Romania, France and the Netherlands.

Their logo is ‘a background of blue sky, the cruciform sword symbolises the force, the laurel crown the victory, and the flaming grenade the common military roots of the police forces’.

The European Arrest Warrant (EAW) can also be used to extradite Britons who have been tried and convicted in their absence by a foreign court.

Meanwhile, the European Commission plans to turn Eurojust – a judicial co-operation body set up in 2002 – into an EU prosecutor using powers given by the Lisbon Treaty.

Also new, the European Investigation Order (EIO) gives foreign police forces the power to compel British police to carry out investigations on their behalf. These may include interrogation of suspects, interception of communications and bank records, and the handing over of DNA samples and fingerprints.

Black Ops: Catherine Zeta-Jones as a Europol agent in Ocean's 12

British police can be forced to investigate offences which are not crimes in the UK, or which they consider to be minor offences.

Before the Home Secretary agreed in July for Britain to opt in to the EIO, Commander Allan Gibson, head of the specialist crime directorate at the Metropolitan Police, wrote to the Government and expressed concern that the investigation order did not allow that the ‘proportionality’ of a crime be considered.

He was also worried about the workings of the EAW, which ‘has been complicated by requests for fugitives suspected of low-level offences’.

Other new laws giving the EU power over Britain include the EU’s Data Retention Directive, which forces telecommunications companies to keep details of every telephone call, email and text message and all web traffic for at least six months, and to make the data available to law enforcement authorities.

Last week, Cecilia Malmstrom, the EU’s Home Affairs Commissioner, demanded that the EU also be given powers to analyse intra-European bank transfers.

And then there is the sinister new committee to be set up under Article 71 of the Lisbon Treaty, called the Committee on Operational Co-operation on Internal Security, known as COSI. Critics say this could be the beginning of an EU Home Office.

The treaty says COSI will be established to ‘ensure operational co-operation on internal security’.

According to a memo from the last Government, signed by disgraced former Labour MP and junior Minister Phil Woolas, the committee would decide how police, border, immigration and criminal justice authorities would deal with cross-border matters.

COSI will, for the first time, bring together three of the EU’s policing and criminal law organisations – Europol, Eurojust and Frontex, the EU’s border security force. Frontex is currently deployed on the border between Greece and Turkey with 19 patrol cars, nine vans equipped with thermal-imaging systems, and a helicopter.

Europol officials will move into a new £8.5million building next year

In July, the three organisations issued their first joint analysis – a report on the state of internal security in the EU. The report insisted that ‘a common integrated architecture is required’ to deal with crime and terrorism in the EU. The word ‘architecture’ is used in Brussels to mean ‘another EU institution.’

So can Britain stop any of this? The answer is almost none of it. The Lisbon Treaty removed Britain’s veto in justice and home affairs. Once Britain has opted in to any part of EU legislation on policing and criminal law, there is no opting out.

Investigation and prosecution programmes are multiplying so rapidly in the EU that, according to Stephen Booth of the think-tank Open Europe, 17 law enforcement systems and databases currently operate or are being developed.

Six of these systems require the collection or storage of personal data at EU level.

The budget devoted to justice and home affairs is set to increase by 13 per cent in 2011 to £944 million, which, as it was in 2010, would be the highest percentage increase among all the different areas.

Conservative MEP Timothy Kirkhope said he was worried about the escalating cost of these agencies.

‘It is important that the costs of all EU agencies, and expenditure on justice and home affairs, reflects the economic challenges within Europe.’ He also warned against ‘a move towards a European harmonised criminal area’.

The shape of things to come: A prototype of a new Euro police car

But Baroness Ludford, Lib Dem MEP and her party’s spokesman on European justice and human rights, dismissed concerns about a harmonised criminal area.

‘Terrorists and mafia bosses pay no attention to national borders, so Europe’s cops and judges have to play in a team to stop the bad guys dodging the law by skipping across borders, which is the purpose of the European Arrest Warrant,’ she said.

However, Mr Booth said: ‘The EAW was a knee-jerk response to 9/11 that has turned out to be completely disproportionate. The premise underlying it is that all member states’ judicial systems are equivalent, when clearly they are not.’

These programmes are part of the drive to form what the Lisbon Treaty calls ‘an area of freedom, security and justice’. This means an EU-wide area of policing, prosecution and law enforcement without frontiers.

Laws governing freedom, security and justice are established in the treaty as a ‘shared competence’. This means EU law can now suppress existing legislation in justice and home affairs in a member state and replace it with European legislation.

Part of the drive to establish this ‘area’ is the insistence that each member state recognise the laws of other member states.

Labour MEP Claude Moraes insisted an EU Home Office was not being created: ‘It is all about political co-operation between member states,’ he said.

But Nigel Farage, MEP and leader of UKIP, disagreed: ‘Are we seeing the creation of an EU Home Office? Yes, absolutely. There is not a single aspect of our lives that these people do not wish to control.’

The Commission intends to forge a ‘common European culture of policing’ by ensuring that over the next five years one-third of all police officers and border guards are trained in European affairs.

And propaganda for a European policing without frontiers is relentless. This summer in The Hague, Europol supported an exhibition of designs for a European police car. Under the headline ‘One European police force?’ Dutch and German designers produced prototypes that, one day, could patrol British streets

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“No man survives when freedom fails, the best men rot in filthy jails, And those who cry ‘appease, appease’ Are hanged by those they tried to please.” Hiram Mann

Are we going to stand up to these cosmocrats.

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Guest spp

Are we going to stand up to these cosmocrats.

So the NWO is just a conspiracy...think again! :angry:

Edited by spp

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I bet in a few years time few people will realise Europol even exists. There might be one or two cases hyped up and misrepresented by the little-Englander right-wing tabloid press, but that's about all. I imagine what Europol will get involved in is combating international like drugs, identity fraud, car parts, copyright etc.

Anyway, after the savage cuts being made to our own police forces, we might be glad to have a few Euro gendarmes patrolling our streets.

Edited by blankster

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I bet in a few years time few people will realise Europol even exists. There might be one or two cases hyped up and misrepresented by the little-Englander right-wing tabloid press, but that's about all. I imagine what Europol will get involved in is combating international like drugs, identity fraud, car parts, copyright etc.

'Europol’s officers have diplomatic immunity in UK and cannot be touched by our judges

An 800-strong paramilitary force has been trained and armed for ‘expeditionary’ missions

British citizens can be seized in UK and sent to foreign jails without appeal'

Are you for real!

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'Europol’s officers have diplomatic immunity in UK and cannot be touched by our judges

An 800-strong paramilitary force has been trained and armed for ‘expeditionary’ missions

British citizens can be seized in UK and sent to foreign jails without appeal'

Are you for real!

Yes - I'm an HPC senior veteran, over 4600 posts, a longstanding supporter of the EU, and also a leftist and proud to stand up and say so, even on a right-wing forum :lol:

Edited by blankster

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Yes - I'm an HPC senior veteran, over 4600 posts, a longstanding supporter of the EU, and also a leftist and proud to stand up and say so, even on a right-wing forum :lol:

What was the difference between hitler and stalin?

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1. Useful Idiot

Unthinking proponents of socialism and/or communism. You can usually find them swarming the internet, participating in riots to promote tolerance, attempting to think up questions for themselves to answer, or sitting in Starbucks with their friends discussing the failings of capitalism over a light frappuccino.

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stalin was a decorated FBI agent who managed to singlehandedly catch the tooth fairy, hitler wasnt and didnt

not sure that is really what the question was about.

Im sure Its more to do with Moustache Appreciation.

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I'm thinking that this might not be such a bad thing.

As we stand today, what really stops a criminal committing their crime and then running off back to their own country. The current system of extradition warrants isn't any good for anything but really big crimes. And even then it takes years and years to make progress.

OK, it probably needs adjustment so that fair trial and treatment occurs (countries different trial and handling procedures is daft), but maybe it could be an improvement.

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I'm thinking that this might not be such a bad thing.

As we stand today, what really stops a criminal committing their crime and then running off back to their own country. The current system of extradition warrants isn't any good for anything but really big crimes. And even then it takes years and years to make progress.

OK, it probably needs adjustment so that fair trial and treatment occurs (countries different trial and handling procedures is daft), but maybe it could be an improvement.

Sounds like we have another ultra-right wing organisation, flush with money, and above the law, forming without our say so, and planned to have dominion over us.

Anyone got any application forms?

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Sounds like we have another ultra-right wing organisation, flush with money, and above the law, forming without our say so, and planned to have dominion over us.

Anyone got any application forms?

just a small point, but where do these guys do their prosecuting?

Are they proscecuting a Hamburg shoplift in Paris Courts?

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just a small point, but where do these guys do their prosecuting?

Are they proscecuting a Hamburg shoplift in Paris Courts?

Shoplifting in Hamburg?, a preposterous slur

On the other hand prosecuting a Paris shoplift in Hamburg Courts might be believable

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At least our relationships within interpol are reciprocal, quite unlike our shameful extradition agreeements with the USA.

Besides which, the courts in Europe seem much more concerned with justice than making a few quid for lawyers, as happens in the UK.

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Their logo is ‘a background of blue sky, the cruciform sword symbolises the force, the laurel crown the victory, and the flaming grenade the common military roots of the police forces’.

It says much about the mentality of those who are setting up this wannabe Praetorian Guard that they include military symbolism to represent a policing unit.

This is nothing more than the creation of a 21st Century S.S. unit. If they ever choose to appear in the UK they should be expelled immediately.

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Try wiping the rabid froth away from your mouths and try looking at their website:

http://www.europol.europa.eu

Yeah they really look like bad guys don't they, latest outrages they have committed?, stopping inter country sex trafficking, and credit card fraud by SUPPORTING POLICE UNITS IN THE COUNTRIES CONCERNED.

These guys are coordinating action between different countries police forces against international crime, they are not going to send a gendarme to Scunthorpe to pick someone up for shoplifting

Yeah definitely look like the bad guys to me, I mean The Mail says they are doesn't it?

The Daily Mail, motto, never let the truth get in the way of a good story!

Sheesh! :D

Europol Mandate (From FAQ on their site)

Europol supports the law enforcement activities of the member states mainly against:

Illicit drug trafficking;

Illicit immigration networks;

Terrorism;

Forgery of money (counterfeiting of the euro) and other means of payment;

Trafficking in human beings (including child pornography);

Illicit vehicle trafficking;

Money laundering.

In addition, other main priorities for Europol include combating crimes against persons, financial crime and cybercrime. Europol comes into action when an organised criminal structure is involved or a case of terrorism or serious crime has occurred which affects two or more Member States.The recent extension of the mandate means that Europol may support Member States investigations into serious crime that is not necessarily carried out by organised groups; e.g. a serial killer operating in two or more Member States.

Europol supports member states by:

Facilitating the exchange of information, in accordance with national law, between Europol liaison officers (ELOs). ELOs are seconded to Europol by the member states as representatives of their national law enforcement agencies;

Providing operational analysis in support of operations;

Generating strategic reports (e.g. threat assessments) and crime analysis on the basis of information and intelligence supplied by member states and third parties;

Providing expertise and technical support for investigations and operations carried out within the EU, under the supervision and the legal responsibility of the member states concerned.

Europol is also active in promoting crime analysis and harmonisation of investigative techniques within the member states.

Edited by madpenguin

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just a small point, but where do these guys do their prosecuting?

there are 800 paramilitaries with diplomatic immunity. Lets just hope they dont end up doing their prosecuting in the woods.

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What paranoiac hokum! I don't think that they're going to be SS/NKVD doomtroopers, but more like Interpol, the FBI, or US Marshals.

then why do they have to be "like interpol"? what was wrong with interpol?

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then why do they have to be "like interpol"? what was wrong with interpol?

Because this organisation can have a specifically European cross border focus and go after organised crime, the fact the guy in charge is British, and speaks Welsh to boot :unsure: (Actually that is very worrying only the Welsh could dream up something so evil and inhumane as the Eistedford!) :P just goes to show the UK not only approves, but probably thought up the entire idea.

People in the UK have always disliked the thought of a police force, I once read how the Metropolitan Police was set up in the 1800's and you wouldn't believe the trouble they had getting it through parliament (pretty much the same arguments being used on here), that's why we've got the rag tag collection of county forces all with different equipment different training and procedures, a nationwide force that could save from uniformity of all this stuff would save us a fortune in tax, and increased efficiency being able to share information (As it is getting a serial killer who kills in 3 counties gets to be an administrative nightmare for the different forces involved)

So yeah, keep thinking this is the new SS, the more help we give to people peddling hard drugs and engaged in sex slave trafficking or terrorism the better, and when your favorite comic moans about high rates of gang related violence, hard drug usage, illegal immigrants and sex trafficking coming into the UK from the EU organised by inter country crime gangs you can cheerily write in and say "Well at least you protected us from the nasty Euro police"

once again from Europol's website :

Europol comes into action when an organised criminal structure is involved or a case of terrorism or serious crime has occurred which affects two or more Member States.

Edited by madpenguin

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