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Kyoto

Painting A Floor

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Ive never done any DIY in my life, but may have to break down and do some this weekend.

Wonder if anybody can help....

We have a wooden floor in one room which was painted white but has started chipping, showing the brown floor boards below for around 1 3rd of the space.

What are our options to paint it again?

Can we go right over the top or do we have to sand it back down?

Is it practical to sand it back by hand or do we need to hire a machine?

Do we have to prime on top of the white paint?

What paint is best to use?

Thanks in advance!

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Ive never done any DIY in my life, but may have to break down and do some this weekend.

Wonder if anybody can help....

We have a wooden floor in one room which was painted white but has started chipping, showing the brown floor boards below for around 1 3rd of the space.

What are our options to paint it again?

Can we go right over the top or do we have to sand it back down?

Is it practical to sand it back by hand or do we need to hire a machine?

Do we have to prime on top of the white paint?

What paint is best to use?

Thanks in advance!

I am not qualified to help with the DIY, but if you do end up sanding by hand, then you must wear knee pads. You can wind up with some nasty pain if you don't. Possibly an extreme example, but a friend of mine got a really nasty condition that lasted weeks as a result of being on his hands and knees for a long time without protection. (Don't say you weren't warned)

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a friend of mine got a really nasty condition that lasted weeks as a result of being on his hands and knees for a long time without protection. (Don't say you weren't warned)

It lasts for more than weeks, and its called Herpes.

:D

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If you go down the sanding root then you will need to hire a sander as it is a lot of work on hands and knees, which will cripple you, otherwise.

The problem with the sanding is that it will blow up vast amounts of paint and wood debris that will get absolutely everywhere.

You will need google, a GOOD mask, gloves, some kind of overals and good boots. You don't want to be breathing in this stuff.

You will need to empty the room completely and have the ability not to just close the door on the rest of the house but also to seal it up as the dust will pour through any gaps around the door to the room and even up/down/through a chimney stack. A very messy job.

Also, if the paint is old lead paint then I would be reluctant to sand it down as you do not want the smallest amount of this stuff getting in your lungs.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=sanding+floor&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&client=firefox-a&rlz=1R1GGGL_en-GB___GB364

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If you go down the sanding root then you will need to hire a sander as it is a lot of work on hands and knees, which will cripple you, otherwise.

The problem with the sanding is that it will blow up vast amounts of paint and wood debris that will get absolutely everywhere.

You will need google, a GOOD mask, gloves, some kind of overals and good boots. You don't want to be breathing in this stuff.

You will need to empty the room completely and have the ability not to just close the door on the rest of the house but also to seal it up as the dust will pour through any gaps around the door to the room and even up/down/through a chimney stack. A very messy job.

Also, if the paint is old lead paint then I would be reluctant to sand it down as you do not want the smallest amount of this stuff getting in your lungs.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=sanding+floor&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&client=firefox-a&rlz=1R1GGGL_en-GB___GB364

OK you just talked me out of that. Guess we can just paint right over the top then?

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OK you just talked me out of that. Guess we can just paint right over the top then?

you might want to sand a little first to rough of the surface so the new paint has something to stick to.

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OK you just talked me out of that. Guess we can just paint right over the top then?

Buy a £13 MACallister hand sander from B&Q - worth every penny. Initially remove all loose or flaking paint with a hand scraper. Use the sander only to 'feather' the raw edges of the existing paint.

Slide the back of a hammer down all floorboards to identify any old nails standing 'proud'. If found, bang 'em down.

Fill any holes in boards with cheap woodfiller, smoothing off.

Hoover room.

Cheap tin of white water-based wood primer. Paint only the brown bits to 'kill' dark colour. Give two three coats. When dry, rub down these patches to smooth. Gently sand down any filled holes to flush.

Buy a high quality (Dulux?)tin of white wood-suitable interior gloss paint. Paint whole floor. 3" brush. Two coats if needed. Slide sheet of newspaper under skirtings, fold upwards and paint to it, to avoid paint on skirtings. Ventilate room well.

Job done. Accept grateful thanks/bunk up from partner.

Cost incl. sander? under £30.

When dry, insert vase of twigs and add £5K to house value...

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Spend the money. Get a man in.

Life's too short to waste a weekend (or more) sanding and painting.

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When dry, insert vase of twigs and add £5K to house value...

Juvenal, you're a legend. I may even split the £5k with you after that!

Thanks!

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Dont sand it down.

Once you start then you have no option but to do the whole lot and that is a big job.

Get some medium/fine sand paper and lightly sand the floor. Lightly as in just to score the top coat of paint on the floor and smooth it out.

You are scratching the top coat to give your paint a good surface to stick to.

After you have lightly sanded hoover and then wipe with a wet cloth. Make sure that you get up all the dust.

There are many paint options and it all depends on how long you can leave the room empty and unused and how much work you want to do.

Personally, I would go for an acrylic paint as they dry very quickly and are hard wearing. If you go to somewhere like B&Q then get someone to talk you through the options, tell them it is for a floor and how much time you have.

Have fun.

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TBF we probably need more information.

When you say 'chipping' is this because you have a south facing room and the paint has started to dry out? I.e. the paint gets hot (as it would do) and eventually, all paint will dry out and eventually chip off.

If it's that, I'd go for hiring a sander, get the equipment *gloves, mask etc) and do the job properly.

If you do go down the sander route (recommended), may I suggest you can also put string into the floor board gaps before filling.

Good luck.

If you are going to strip it then there are other methods that remove more paint quickly before getting to the sander.

If I went to all the effort of stripping boards back ( not just sanding them smooth before a varnish like most do) then there is no way that I would be putting paint back on them.

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Depending on the quality of the wood when you sand it back you might want to consider treating with oil or polyurethane instead.. nice natural wood floor :)

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Buy a high quality (Dulux?)tin of white wood-suitable interior gloss paint. Paint whole floor. 3" brush. Two coats if needed.

I'd never use two coats of gloss on anything. I'd do everything as you said, then undercoat, and then one coat of gloss.

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Good advice, but it is reliant on bumping into a painter and decorator in B&Q.

nah, go down to the trade counter and ask one of the old boys - they all know their stuff.

Failing that, they should be able to call someone for you that at the very least can summarise the differences and options.

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nah, go down to the trade counter and ask one of the old boys - they all know their stuff.

Failing that, they should be able to call someone for you that at the very least can summarise the differences and options.

Actually that's true. B&Q do have a reasonably good record of employing a few older blokes who know their onions.

Not sure if it's a publicity stunt though, and of course they can't select people based on their age anyway can they?

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Actually that's true. B&Q do have a reasonably good record of employing a few older blokes who know their onions.

Not sure if it's a publicity stunt though, and of course they can't select people based on their age anyway can they?

It isnt worth asking the majority of B&Q staff anything but if you go to the trade counter then the old boys there are all tradesmen. They couldnt put young and clueless on a trade counter and expect any business.

I would definitely go acrylic on this one for quick drying time, ruggedness and being odour free.

Nothing worse than having a rooms worth of furniture spread around the house for a couple of days and an entire room that you cant go in.

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Dont sand it down.

Once you start then you have no option but to do the whole lot and that is a big job.

Get some medium/fine sand paper and lightly sand the floor. Lightly as in just to score the top coat of paint on the floor and smooth it out.

You are scratching the top coat to give your paint a good surface to stick to.

After you have lightly sanded hoover and then wipe with a wet cloth. Make sure that you get up all the dust.

There are many paint options and it all depends on how long you can leave the room empty and unused and how much work you want to do.

Personally, I would go for an acrylic paint as they dry very quickly and are hard wearing. If you go to somewhere like B&Q then get someone to talk you through the options, tell them it is for a floor and how much time you have.

Have fun.

Deffo go with this prep. If it is flaking at all use a scraper to get rid of the worst first. Make sure he floor is dry first before applying top coat. Uner no circumstances hire a sander - it paint will clog the paper almost immediately and you will get nowhere with it unless you do the full monty on it.

Cut in the edges with a brush and use a small roller fine pile roller along the boards, don't overladen the roller and if you want to make it really easy use it on the end of a normal extension pole. Make sure you start at the far corner of the room and work your way out to the door! Do not be tempted to walk on the paint until totally dry, you'll ruin the job if you do.

Sadolin superdec (satin and gloss) is a brill acrylic paint, but nowhere near the cheapest, it is hard wearing and durable outside, not for decking but indoor floors should be ok, best ask though.

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Should've rented.

The bulls are using the wrong arguments, they'll never get anywhere with the guff they're spouting.

They need to fire off a load of interesting DIY threads and I'll be straight down the EA to see slick haired Nigel in the morning. Its killing me to not do odd jobs round this rented house.

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The bulls are using the wrong arguments, they'll never get anywhere with the guff they're spouting.

They need to fire off a load of interesting DIY threads and I'll be straight down the EA to see slick haired Nigel in the morning. Its killing me to not do odd jobs round this rented house.

Me too, actually. I've taken to surreptitiously doing small jobs that they probably won't notice.

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You will need google, a GOOD mask, gloves, some kind of overals and good boots. You don't want to be breathing in this stuff.

Google has maps, search, streetview, and now it even lends a hand with DIY.

Whatever next? ;)

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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