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frugalboy

Un's Human Development Index - Where's The Uk?

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But we did manage to beat Portugal. Of course there's more to this list than economics, it also looks at education and health, but I mean really....

UK at no. 26 and Ireland at no.5?? :lol::lol::lol::lol:

Those jokers at the UN probably believe the ECB when they say it's all contained.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Human_Development_Index

Edited by frugalboy

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But we did manage to beat Portugal. Of course there's more to this list than economics, it also looks at education and health, but I mean really....

UK at no. 26 and Ireland at no.5?? :lol::lol::lol::lol:

Those jokers at the UN probably believe the ECB when they say it's all contained.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Human_Development_Index

Where's the problem? UK massively overcrowded, long history of substandard 'low-cost' housing, lots of people on long, ghastly daily commutes, roads off-limits for the vulnerable leaving children stuck at home, etc, etc. Ireland has open space, shorter history of bad housing, smaller-scale commutes, children who can go out, etc, etc.

The fact we're rich in the money to buy consumer goods isn't everything.

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Where's the problem? UK massively overcrowded, long history of substandard 'low-cost' housing, lots of people on long, ghastly daily commutes, roads off-limits for the vulnerable leaving children stuck at home, etc, etc. Ireland has open space, shorter history of bad housing, smaller-scale commutes, children who can go out, etc, etc.

The fact we're rich in the money to buy consumer goods isn't everything.

In that case then, remove Scotland, and England would struggle to make the top 50!

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Where's the problem? UK massively overcrowded, long history of substandard 'low-cost' housing, lots of people on long, ghastly daily commutes, roads off-limits for the vulnerable leaving children stuck at home, etc, etc. Ireland has open space, shorter history of bad housing, smaller-scale commutes, children who can go out, etc, etc.

The fact we're rich in the money to buy consumer goods isn't everything.

Hmm if that's the level of detail they went in to then maybe there would be a case but it's based on three very simplistic criteria.

* A long and healthy life: Life expectancy at birth

* Access to knowledge: Mean years of schooling and Expected years of schooling

* A decent standard of living: GNI per capita (PPP US$)

So in theory you could have a country with a bunch of idiots who need to stay in school for 20 years but with decent healthy genes and massive natural reserves in first place, and a country who live the high life eating Foie Gras and their educational standards are so good they only stay in school until 16 when they have a very good grounding in last.

As a rough guide I'm sure most countries are about where they should be but there are many more criteria for a nice place to live, for example I'd much rather be sitting with my feet up by the sea in Spain (20) for 75 years that freezing my ******** off in Norway (1) for 80, or getting bitten by Spiders and Snakes in Australia.

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Where's the problem? UK massively overcrowded, long history of substandard 'low-cost' housing, lots of people on long, ghastly daily commutes, roads off-limits for the vulnerable leaving children stuck at home, etc, etc. Ireland has open space, shorter history of bad housing, smaller-scale commutes, children who can go out, etc, etc.

The fact we're rich in the money to buy consumer goods isn't everything.

Obviously doesn't take into account kiddy molesting priests otherwise Ireland would be a lot further down!

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Where's the problem? UK massively overcrowded, long history of substandard 'low-cost' housing, lots of people on long, ghastly daily commutes, roads off-limits for the vulnerable leaving children stuck at home, etc, etc. Ireland has open space, shorter history of bad housing, smaller-scale commutes, children who can go out, etc, etc.

The fact we're rich in the money to buy consumer goods isn't everything.

I'm not saying the UK deserves to be in the top 10 (or even top 20), I was just quite surprised at some of the countries who are supposedly way ahead of us on the measure of "human development". If they're so developed then why are their economies such basket cases. I agree it's not all about wealth, but having a functioning, largely debt-free economy is key to long term human well being. Or to put it another way, if a country is providing first class health care and education using borrowed money, should you really rate them highly? Because it's only a matter of time before it all blows up.

It's also quite depressing for a country that was probably no.1 on pretty much every measure just a few generations ago to have fallen so far so fast (if you believe the rankings). I first came across the rankings here:

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2010/11/forget-gdp-here-are-the-most-advanced-countries-in-the-world/66460/

The slide show starts at no.23 (Italy) and as I clicked through, I kept expecting the UK to be coming up soon. When I saw Greece, Spain, Iceland and Ireland (to name but a few such basket cases) but no UK, it dawned on me how much Labour have really squandered any chance of reversing our decline. Or maybe the UN's still making us pay for our colonial adventures :unsure:

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  • 246 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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