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Nick Clegg 'propped Up' Gordon Brown To Seal Tory Deal:

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Sorry Mods but this is very important to post in Politics. :blink:

Buckingham Palace helped David Cameron and Nick Clegg keep Gordon Brown in Downing Street in the days after he lost the Election to make it easier for the Coalition to take power, a former Cabinet Minister claims tonight.

The Palace, together with the ­Conservative and Liberal Democrat leaders, made Mr Brown believe he still had a chance of clinging to power – even though they knew he didn’t – because it was feared he might resign too quickly and leave Britain without a Government.

The ploy to prop up Mr Brown gave Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg vital extra hours to seal their political alliance and avoided plunging the Queen into a constitutional ­crisis, with no Prime Minister.

From Your Favourite Newspaper :D

Mr Laws, a senior Liberal Democrat who was present throughout the discussions, gives the first blow-by-blow insider’s account of the high-octane and often acrimonious exchanges between the party leaders and rival negotiating teams.

His book, 22 Days In May, exclusively serialised in The Mail on ­Sunday from today, reveals how:

* The Lib Dems never really wanted to do a deal with Mr Brown and be ‘chained to the Labour Government’s decaying corpse’.

* Ed Miliband was reduced to the role of ‘tea boy’ in the talks – and revealed that he could not upset the unions.

* Peter Mandelson responded to Mr Laws’s support for a mansion tax on £2 million-plus houses by ­protesting: ‘Surely the rich have suffered enough?’

* When the Coalition talks stalled, panicking David Cameron exclaimed: ‘People will soon be asking who the hell is running the country.’

* After being harangued by ‘impossible’ Mr Brown, Mr Clegg cried out: ‘That man!’ – and fellow Lib Dem Danny Alexander called the former Prime Minister ‘absolutely barmy’.

* Ed Balls, Ed Miliband and Harriet Harman deliberately sabotaged any prospect of a Lib-Lab pact.

The book, which makes extensive use of a near-verbatim record of the talks kept by long-serving Lib Dem aide Alison Suttie, marks Mr Laws’s return to the political limelight ­following his shock resignation from the ­Cabinet just weeks into the Coalition.

He was forced to step down when it emerged that the secretly gay MP had claimed £40,000 in second-home expenses for renting a room from his partner, James Lundie, a lobbyist.

As long as Mr Laws is not censured too severely when the results of an official inquiry are published, he is widely expected to return to the Cabinet within months. Mr Cameron has called him ‘a very effective politician’.

Clever these Lib/Dems just follow the dog who gives bigger and better bones. :lol:

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The Palace, together with the ­Conservative and Liberal Democrat leaders, made Mr Brown believe he still had a chance of clinging to power – even though they knew he didn’t – because it was feared he might resign too quickly and leave Britain without a Government.

considering what was going on in Greece at the time this sounds pretty good judegment - well done Queenie

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Journos trying to make it sound like they had the faintest clue what they were doing. And it's not what they were saying at the time - another convenient rewriting.

More stuff based on a few flimsy quotes and other suchlike from a bunch of "dissemblers" and twisters - and that's just the politicians.

Edited by billybong

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Now the NUS are going to campaign to oust the Lib/Dems, oh well, interesting times ahead, so glad I am now just an observer. :D Off tomorrow to inject some cash into the economy. ;)

Fair play to em for trying and the Liberals can't really complain after what they did with Woollas. NUS will have to run this one until the next election though.

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Clever these Lib/Dems just follow the dog who gives bigger and better bones. :lol:

Not to mention promising all sorts in the blithe confidence that they'd never be called upon to deliver.

Should imagine they'll be a mite more circumspect with their manifestos in future.

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Not to mention promising all sorts in the blithe confidence that they'd never be called upon to deliver.

I`m afraid at the next Election the Lib/Dems will sink into obscurity where IMPO they belong. A weak no clue party, full of members who seek to push their own minority agendas, not a Party who represents the electorate in general.

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I`m afraid at the next Election the Lib/Dems will sink into obscurity where IMPO they belong. A weak no clue party, full of members who seek to push their own minority agendas, not a Party who represents the electorate in general.

Sky News the Lib/Dems were ready to scrap their policy on Uni Fees 2 months before the Election in anticipation of joining a coalition Government. :rolleyes:

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Not to mention promising all sorts in the blithe confidence that they'd never be called upon to deliver.

Should imagine they'll be a mite more circumspect with their manifestos in future.

Haha, hasn't anybody realised they can't ever have a manifesto again. They can have ideas and hope that the senior partners in any coalition they may enter into like the ideas. The easy way out is to have the same ideas as any potential senior partner but then their reason to exist ends. No doubt they'll be plotting for a second term in coalition with the electoral pact that will require to guarantee. Very strong rumours here in Sheffield that Clegg is requesting that Tories do not oppose him in Sheffield Hallam at the next election. That can only backfire terribly. The Libs created a terrible strategic problem for themselves.

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Sky News the Lib/Dems were ready to scrap their policy on Uni Fees 2 months before the Election in anticipation of joining a coalition Government. :rolleyes:

They were being pragmatic perhaps. Clegg commented in the days before the election that he would work with the biggest party. Not like he didn't warn people. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

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Sorry Mods but this is very important to post in Politics. :blink:

From Your Favourite Newspaper :D

Clever these Lib/Dems just follow the dog who gives bigger and better bones. :lol:

Proper gamesmanship. I suspect Cameron may even have had a hand in this to help him convince the most reluctant members of his own party.

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Fair play to em for trying and the Liberals can't really complain after what they did with Woollas. NUS will have to run this one until the next election though.

The Woolas business is about the only thing that's ever made me warm ever so slightly to the LDs.

Thoroughly nasty, obnoxious, slimy little sh*t of a man.

IMPO of course. :)

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Fair play to em for trying and the Liberals can't really complain after what they did with Woollas. NUS will have to run this one until the next election though.

Woolas told direct lies about his opponent being arrested and his campaign team was caught trying to "get white people angry". Doesn't actually compare.

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I`m afraid at the next Election the Lib/Dems will sink into obscurity where IMPO they belong. A weak no clue party, full of members who seek to push their own minority agendas, not a Party who represents the electorate in general.

You mean there IS a party who represents the electorate??

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Clegg won't be leading the lib-dems at the next election. Or, if he does, he will step down immediately afterwards. I should think he knows this and has already planned his exit strategy.

I would bet money on it.

Edited by tallguy

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Sorry Mods but this is very important to post in Politics. :blink:

From Your Favourite Newspaper :D

Clever these Lib/Dems just follow the dog who gives bigger and better bones. :lol:

I agree with what Dragon What'sHerName said on AM this morning.

"So what, isn't this how politics works?"

tim

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Clegg won't be leading the lib-dems at the next election. Or, if he does, he will step down immediately afterwards. I should think he knows this and has already planned his exit strategy.

I would bet money on it.

Surely that will depend entirely on how well they are doing in the polls at the time.

tim

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Journos trying to make it sound like they had the faintest clue what they were doing. And it's not what they were saying at the time - another convenient rewriting.

More stuff based on a few flimsy quotes and other suchlike from a bunch of "dissemblers" and twisters - and that's just the politicians.

+1

The campaign to remove Brown after the election was constitutionally wrong and deeply misguided.

The Queen chooses a Prime Minister, on the advice of parliament.

The Prime Minister chooses a government to govern the country on behalf of the Queen and the electorate.

The government stays in power until such time as any parliament in existence advises the Queen to pick a new Prime Minister.

A parliament is dissolved when the Prime Minister recommends to the Queen that it is dissolved, or the Prime Minister looses a vote of confidence.

Most importantly, when parliament is dissolved, the government is not dissolved.

The government, and the Prime Minister remain in place with all theoretical powers. In practice, it is agreed that the government will not enact divisive legislation, and preferably will not take any significant actions until the next parliament is in place.

The prime minister and government remain in place so they can run the country. This is a good thing, for example if somebody declares war on us, or we face a sovereign debt crisis.

When a new parliament is elected, and the new parliament is able to propose a new prime minister; then, and only then, the old prime minister will go to the Queen, tender his resignation, and suggest that the Queen ask the new leader proposed by parliament to be the new Prime Minister.

This system means that the actual time gap between on PM resigning and the next one taking over is a matter of a couple of hours.

The suggestions in the paper that Gordon Brown was wrongly trying to 'cling' to office are not just rubbish, they are dangerous and foolish rubbish that would put the country at risk.

The conservatives didn't 'win' the last election. They won the most seats in parliament. Not the same.

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Surely the Libdems are finished after this. They are supposed to have the balance of power, so why are they not using it? They are being asked to renege on a firm pledge on tuition fees, and defend this to the media. This must be highly embarassing for them. Why are they not threatening to bring down the government?

After this, they can have all the PR they want but they'll still be wiped out.

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* The Lib Dems never really wanted to do a deal with Mr Brown and be ‘chained to the Labour Government’s decaying corpse’.

I think the Mail said this, but it doesn't match their text. For example:

"Monday, May 10

At sunrise there was all to play for. By sundown the die was cast."

The Lib Dem MPs (not leadership) and former leaders were overwhelmingly in favour of the Lib-Lab option, but the combination of the numbers not making sense without the nationalists or Ulster Unionists and the hostility of Ed Balls and people like David Blunkett and Jack Straw meant that the Tories were the only option. That's why it took five days to get what was obvious in the first five hours.

The Tories did not need extra parties to form a government and their nutters were easier to sit on. If both parties were at the same standing and showing the same willingness to deal then Clegg could not have secured a Tory deal, no matter how much he wanted one. After a while in power a party gets restless for opposition, and that's what happened to the Labour Party.

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Who cares.

Before this is all over I doubt whether any of the major parties is going to survive in its current form.

I think to many people are mesmirised by the feebleness of the last Labour government

They mistake the newness of the Coalition and its different agenda for political strength.

The reality is that it has not really been tested yet.

When it is I think we might find the current majority in Parliament is far from bullet proof (in fact it is less than Brown's administration before it expired)

Once they have been rocked by a few storms such as bad local election results for the Lib Dems or blow ups on key issues such as Europe I expect some members of both coalition parties to go AWOL either officially or unofficially.

The governments main trump card is that the official opposition is so weak and discredited. Whether that happy state of affairs is likely to continue is not clear. However, it does not guarantee smooth sailing since I think the main challenges to the coalition are going to come from elsewhere. Indeed, it may ultimately involve a completely diffrent shape of politics altogether.

Edited by realcrookswearsuits

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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