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JoeDavola

Vitamin D Supplements

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Been meaning to give Vitimin D supplements a go for a while, but being the procrastinaor that I am never got round to buying them. I wanted to make sure whatever I was taking was good 'quality' (whatever that means) and I'm not sure what to get and where to get them. What I have gathered is that the capsules/gel are supposidly better than taking them in tablet form?

Went to H&B last weekend and they only seemed to have them in tablet form - and it's probably cheaper to buy online anyway. I'm thinking of taking about 4000IU a day.

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Been meaning to give Vitimin D supplements a go for a while, but being the procrastinaor that I am never got round to buying them. I wanted to make sure whatever I was taking was good 'quality' (whatever that means) and I'm not sure what to get and where to get them. What I have gathered is that the capsules/gel are supposidly better than taking them in tablet form?

Went to H&B last weekend and they only seemed to have them in tablet form - and it's probably cheaper to buy online anyway. I'm thinking of taking about 4000IU a day.

Go outside a bit more.

Turns out your not the only one though

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-11741262

More than 20% of children tested for bone problems in Southampton showed signs of the crippling disease rickets, a health trust has revealed.

Consultant orthopaedic surgeon Prof Nicholas Clarke checked more than 200 of the city's children for bone problems caused by a lack of vitamin D.

Looks like keeping the kids "safe" in the house wasn't the best idea after all. :ph34r:

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Pills? What a pain!

I bought a couple of these full spectrum light bulbs. They recreate natural sunlight in your home which in turn makes your body create vitamin D naturally. They are a bit bright (just like sunlight) so you may want to put them in a corridor or kitchen but they do work. The light reminds me of being on a hot, sunny beach. I suffer from SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) apparently, otherwise known as the winter blues/moody git syndrome, and these lightbulbs worked a treat during the winter months. Vitamin D deficiency is due to lack of sunlight so here is a great alternative to popping pills...

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Pills? What a pain!

I bought a couple of these full spectrum light bulbs. They recreate natural sunlight in your home which in turn makes your body create vitamin D naturally. They are a bit bright (just like sunlight) so you may want to put them in a corridor or kitchen but they do work. The light reminds me of being on a hot, sunny beach. I suffer from SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) apparently, otherwise known as the winter blues/moody git syndrome, and these lightbulbs worked a treat during the winter months. Vitamin D deficiency is due to lack of sunlight so here is a great alternative to popping pills...

Interesting. Do you have them on at night? Exposure to these bulbs at night is usually not recommended as your Melatonin production gets confused if you have strong light exposure at night. Do you not find that you have trouble getting to sleep?

As for Vitamin D - I am currently using a liquid D3, 5000IU per dose made by Nature's plus.

If you do take it I'd be really interested to know if your appetite increases on it. I find that mine does which has put me off taking it a bit, even though my last tests were so deficient in vit D that I should really be sticking with it.

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Go outside a bit more.

Turns out your not the only one though

http://www.bbc.co.uk...pshire-11741262

Looks like keeping the kids "safe" in the house wasn't the best idea after all. :ph34r:

So what do the Nordics take in their diet when it's twilight up there for about 3 hrs a day?

You don't see many 'rickety' ones.

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So what do the Nordics take in their diet when it's twilight up there for about 3 hrs a day?

You don't see many 'rickety' ones.

Cod liver oil or similar - like we used to here when I were a nipper

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Just open your ruddy curtains and your body will make all the Vit D required. Don't be fooled by these needless pills.

That said, if you do will buy the pills, I can sell you some other pills that will help your body absorb the vits, £10 for 50 :)

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I don't have a car, I basically walk everywhere. I'd guess I walk for about 7 hours a week. However, with the weather being the way it is, I'm not getting as much of a chance to get out. Plus, after a couple of months of watching everyone around me in the office getting sick, my immune system has finally given up and I seem to be catching a cold. My office has virtually no natural light and I've been too busy lately to go out for my lunch time walks.

I think I have SAD, if those lightbulbs that were mentioned actually do what you say they do then it would be amazing. I'm skeptical that they actually do that though, but I'll look into them.

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my last tests were so deficient in vit D that I should really be sticking with it.

How do you get tested for various vitimin deficiencies? Is this something you can get done on the NHS or do you have to pay to get it done privately?

The reason I ask is that I went to my GP a couple of years back complaining of being tired ect...and she sent me for a blood test - I had the blood test and then they never bothered getting back to me! I think the logic may have been that if nothing was wrong there was no point in contacting me but I still would have liked to have known either way.

If there's a reasonably affordable private option then I'd probably go for that, such is my lack of faith in the NHS for these matters. IMHO people should be having these blood tests every year, and receive advice on diet/lifestyle based on the results - instead of waiting till your ill and pumping you full of drugs.

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Just open your ruddy curtains and your body will make all the Vit D required. Don't be fooled by these needless pills.

Vitamin D is produced by the action of ultraviolet B light on the skin. Window glass blocks UVB, so opening the curtains won't help; you've got to go outside, and even then the winter sun in much of the UK isn't intense enough to do any good.

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Try eating the pips of apples. (No more than the contents of three apples per day).

The Vitamin D14 (I believe) is a protection against cancer.

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To answer the OP - I get my Vitamin D from an ebay shop here in the UK.

I buy the brand Healthy Origins as they make Vitamin D in the D3 form that the body needs, their capsules come in softgel form so the D3 is easily absorbed by the body and the sofgels are gluten free/veggie friendly.

I buy them in the 2,400 IU per capsule size which allowed me to take 2 to 3 capsules per day for 3 months when I began last January. I recently bought a bottle with 5,000 IU capsules as I seem to have now settled on about 5,000 IUs per day so decided to just take one capsule when my 2,400 IU bottle runs out.

The Mail had an article about Jon Sopel this week - he had fallen off his moped in London and fractured his hip. When they tested his D levels they discovered he was low. Only this morning a doctor in Southampton was on the radio talking about a 200% increase in rickets in children - it is because the kids are being kept out of the sunshine and covered in sunscreen.

I am convinced my asthma started as a result of myself not going outside in the Summer since the mid-1990s without slapping myself in sunscreen.

Once the Sun goes below the horizon in Sept you cannot make D3 in your body from the Sun until the Sun rises above the horizon in late March/early April. As a rule of thumb, if your shadow is longer than your height then you cannot make D3 in your body from sunshine even if you walk around naked all day every day. Even in a UK Summer before 10AM and after 3PM you cannot make D3.

Google:

VitaminDHealth

VitaminDCouncil

Grassroots Health.

Edit:

The Vitamin D Council has a good page on doseage.

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So what do the Nordics take in their diet when it's twilight up there for about 3 hrs a day?

You don't see many 'rickety' ones.

That is because their diet is incredibly high in D3 - they eat mainly oily fish and reindeer both of which are full of D3.

Same with the Induit - many of the modern illnesses of man are unknown to them due to the fish and seal diet.

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To answer the OP - I get my Vitamin D from an ebay shop here in the UK.

Cheers - picked up a bottle of the 5000 IU ones. I've got mixed feelings on vitimin supplements, can never make my mind up whether to start tking a multivitimin or not, but from what I've read, Vitimin D does seem to be one worth taking (especially in the climate I live in!). Was surprised (almost suspicious) at how cheap they were but then again maybe these things don't have to be expensive to work - I'm a fan of Mark 'Primal Blueprint' Sisson's overall approach to health and fitness, but his multivitimin works out at a shocking £80 a month - I admit I'd pay that if I thought it was giving me greater benefits than lesser multivitmins - and with some studies showing multivitimins can possibly e bad for you, or just give you very expensive urine, I've decided to hold off on taking them for now.

For anyone interested, here is the pricey multivitimin I'm referring to; a total of 12 capsules a day:

http://primalbluepri...er-Formula.html

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Cheers - picked up a bottle of the 5000 IU ones. I've got mixed feelings on vitimin supplements, can never make my mind up whether to start tking a multivitimin or not, but from what I've read, Vitimin D does seem to be one worth taking (especially in the climate I live in!). Was surprised (almost suspicious) at how cheap they were but then again maybe these things don't have to be expensive to work

OK, a couple of points.

1. You need some magnesium, some boron, a tiny, tiny amount of Vit A and some calcium in your diet to make D3 work. You also need to have some fat with the D3 when you take it as D3 is fat-soluable so you need to rethink things like cheese, hood quality bacon, etc, if you have eliminated them from your diet.

2. You most likely will find in the first 2 to 4 week that you will have a huge craving for chocolate and/or cheese. You either go with the flow or you don't but don't be surprised if you notice this.

The VitaminDCouncil, as I stated previously, has excellent info on all this stuff.

I could bore you for hours about D3. Suffice to say I have become convinced that a lack of D3 is a major cause of cancers, allergies and asthma in the Western World today. It has transformed my health in ways I cannot believe.

You will need to take this for a minimum 3 months for it to build up in your body but perhaps longer depending how deficent you are in it. But you may well notice improvements in as little as a fortnight.

Professor Michael Hollick of Boston University School of Medicence - world expert - recommends about 50,000 IUs per week for 3 to 6 months before dropping down the dose.

On days when you sunbathe without sunscreen do not take any D3 supplement. Do not burn.

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That is because their diet is incredibly high in D3 - they eat mainly oily fish and reindeer both of which are full of D3.

Same with the Induit - many of the modern illnesses of man are unknown to them due to the fish and seal diet.

I eat a fair amount of fish in my diet, so hopefully I can bypass the need for supplements? I spend all my time outdoors, but wear sunscreen on sunny days to counteract skin damage. I would say that even being outdoors constantly, during winter months the lack of clear sunlight has a major effect on mood.

I recall working a night-shift for a long long time many years ago. In retrospect I was going stir crazy. I used those UV bulbs, but it wasn't enough. I craved sugar and put on weight as a result. When I finally met my manager again during daytime hours I could tell he was taken aback by the change in my appearance and mood. I did enjoy the night-shift tbh, but most people acknowledge it's dangerous to health.

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OK, a couple of points.

1. You need some magnesium, some boron, a tiny, tiny amount of Vit A and some calcium in your diet to make D3 work. You also need to have some fat with the D3 when you take it as D3 is fat-soluable so you need to rethink things like cheese, hood quality bacon, etc, if you have eliminated them from your diet.

OK - a month or so ago I did a nutrient breakdown of my typical diet on fitday.com and I don't think I was all that lacking in anything, although I seem to remember strangley enough that I wasn't getting enough calcium, so I'll address that.

I get my fat from nuts and mackrel and various other things, so I should be ok there - the diet I'm following isn't one where I'm trying to be low-fat.

Do you get all of the above from diet only or do you take further suplements?

2. You most likely will find in the first 2 to 4 week that you will have a huge craving for chocolate and/or cheese. You either go with the flow or you don't but don't be surprised if you notice this.

That should be interesting - as it is, chocolate is one of my weak spots when it comes to diet. Now of course the answer is just don't buy chocolate, but when my parents come round to visit once a week mum always brings piles of chocolate with her which she leaves in the flat. And I can't just eat one biscuit, I have to eat the whole packet in one sitting. I had actually thought of taking the weekly choclate stash and giving it to the homless guys round the corner from me.

I could bore you for hours about D3. Suffice to say I have become convinced that a lack of D3 is a major cause of cancers, allergies and asthma in the Western World today. It has transformed my health in ways I cannot believe.

When I'm in a sunny climate, the type of sun and warmth that we probably get for 10 days a year here in Belfast, I feel like a different person (in a good way). I don't know where that has anything to to with D3 but it's one of the reasons I'm giving D3 supplements a go.

Professor Michael Hollick of Boston University School of Medicence - world expert - recommends about 50,000 IUs per week for 3 to 6 months before dropping down the dose.

Yes I've read about the idea of megadoses, some even greater than the figure you are quoting - I think I'll just start on 5000 a day, and see what side effects I get - if I'm ok after a couple of weeks then I'll maybe up the dose a bit. In about 3 months time I'll see about getting some blood tests - something that I'll have to do privately as my GP is crap but I'd like to have as complete a picture of my health as possible.

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I eat a fair amount of fish in my diet, so hopefully I can bypass the need for supplements? I spend all my time outdoors, but wear sunscreen on sunny days to counteract skin damage. I would say that even being outdoors constantly, during winter months the lack of clear sunlight has a major effect on mood.

I recall working a night-shift for a long long time many years ago. In retrospect I was going stir crazy. I used those UV bulbs, but it wasn't enough. I craved sugar and put on weight as a result. When I finally met my manager again during daytime hours I could tell he was taken aback by the change in my appearance and mood. I did enjoy the night-shift tbh, but most people acknowledge it's dangerous to health.

You make about 10,000 IUs of D3 in the UK between about mid April and end of September if you spend about 20 to 30 minutes in the Sun with arms, legs and upper torso uncovered and no sunscreen.

Sunscreen stops about around 98% of D3 creation so, whilst it is important not to burn, you can begin to see the dangers of sunscreen. Since the introduction of sunscreen asthma, allergies and some cancers, even autism, have soared in this country.

To get enough D3 from, say salmon, you would need to be eating about 3 whole salmon per day every day. Hence why supplementation here in the UK during the winter is vital.

Yes, sunlight has a massive affect on mood. In reality, here in the UK we should stay in the UK in the Summer and plan a holiday to the Sun in Jan/Feb time.

Yes, many Docs specialise in the problems to your physical and mental health that can result from working at night.

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OK - a month or so ago I did a nutrient breakdown of my typical diet on fitday.com and I don't think I was all that lacking in anything, although I seem to remember strangley enough that I wasn't getting enough calcium, so I'll address that.

I get my fat from nuts and mackrel and various other things, so I should be ok there - the diet I'm following isn't one where I'm trying to be low-fat.

Do you get all of the above from diet only or do you take further suplements?

That should be interesting - as it is, chocolate is one of my weak spots when it comes to diet. Now of course the answer is just don't buy chocolate, but when my parents come round to visit once a week mum always brings piles of chocolate with her which she leaves in the flat. And I can't just eat one biscuit, I have to eat the whole packet in one sitting. I had actually thought of taking the weekly choclate stash and giving it to the homless guys round the corner from me.

When I'm in a sunny climate, the type of sun and warmth that we probably get for 10 days a year here in Belfast, I feel like a different person (in a good way). I don't know where that has anything to to with D3 but it's one of the reasons I'm giving D3 supplements a go.

Yes I've read about the idea of megadoses, some even greater than the figure you are quoting - I think I'll just start on 5000 a day, and see what side effects I get - if I'm ok after a couple of weeks then I'll maybe up the dose a bit. In about 3 months time I'll see about getting some blood tests - something that I'll have to do privately as my GP is crap but I'd like to have as complete a picture of my health as possible.

I take a calcium supplement - 1 Osteocare tablet per day.

Your Mum loves you - let her Mother you and be glad of it. One day she won't be there doing those things for you. Enjoy an treasure every moment. I would give anything to have my Mum back doing those things.

Nuts, mackerel - very good for you.

Yes, the D3 is why you feel wonderful after a few days in the Sun in Belfast. You may - just may - find you have the same initial kick within a week or two of starting D3. I normally feel terrible around this time of year due to SAD but so far this year, touch wood, I do not.

You need to read the info at the Vitamin D Council's webite, the same at Grassrootshealth and have a look for lectures on Youtube by Professor Michael Hollick.

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sorry for late reply to questions..

How did I get test on the NHS for Vit D? I have an autoimmune condition which new research is finding VitD deficiency common in and there are 2 other different conditions in my parents/grandparents that also came up in the studies, I also had a bone scan as bone thinning often happens with this condition and they found ostopenia. Therefore, when having my usual tests I managed to persuade a registrar to add VitD in - no one offered it to me, I had to ask. Once it came up as deficient now they will test regularly. Although my consultant is not in the least bit interested in the results and just tells me to get it monitored by the G.P.. He seems happy to stick with the old conventional medicines.

Sun - I made a big effort this year to get out more as I don't go in the sun much due to burning easily. Didn't work at all, levels didn't rise.

Other test I had regularly was B12 as people with my condition known to be low in it. I had hardly noticed it was being tested and never bothered to ask about it. I then read it was often low in the other conditions in my family so I asked for copies of my blood tests (always get copies from your GP/hospital - it can be changes as much as levels that are important to note and busy doctors just look for "out of range" and not in too much detail) - yes I was in range but had only been just in range for years I found out - when I began to supplement I noticed an improvement in my mood and less coughs/colds/cold sores - and blood tests now show me at the top of the acceptable range.

You can get private tests via Genova Diagnostics UK but you will also have to pay a private practitioner as well.

This G.P. helped some people I know get tests that discovered deficiencies that the NHS had completely overlooked, she is now suspended, I haven't had time to read more about why

Dr Myhill

I would not advise anyone to take high levels of supplements without blood tests. I have a genetic bias to some deficiencies, this won't be for all.

I would also remind people the benefit of good hygiene to keep away the bugs, always washing hands with hot soapy water, especially before eating and after coming off public transport in the cold season (and of course after a toilet visit, however brief), wiping down phone/keyboard at work if it is shared. Not eating at desk around people snuffling etc..This is not some OCD type behaviour, this is basic hygiene we were taught when I was young that seems to have been completely forgotten in these days of easily accessed modern medicine.

As for appetitie rising with VitD - I don't think it is down to other deficiences, unless the body needs more of another nutrient with vit D and therefore is demanding it. Vit D is a secosteroid. Those of us who have been put on high steroid doses for autoimmune illness know that steroids increase your appetite dramatically. My non science based but instinctive answer is that the VitD has a similar effect.

Think that was all the questions answered. Will be pleased to hear people's experiences if you do supplement.

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Although I roll my eyes at most phoney 'syndromes' I guess I do have SAD. When the clocks go back I'm hit hard. I really do feel like I could hibernate. Even a gloomy summer gets me down so winter couped up under artificial light pushes me over the edge.

However, there are some things that help.

Vit D - I tend to take this as cod liver oil. Just a big spoonful a day. there's some debate as to whether you should take it without Vit A to avoid an excess or whether A and D are synergistic. All I can say that when I took a big dose of D within a few days I'd get joint and muscle aches that would go if I cut the D. No ill effects from a good cod liver oil.

Vitamin B complex and 2-3mg of Vit C really do help and ward off colds and well has being key 'energy' vitamins.

One supplement I've discovered in the last couple of years is an amino acid - 5-HTP. This stuff you really feel - it's a real mood and energy enhancer but what I really feel with the winter blues is that I just can't be arsed or cope with anything. This really does regulate stress levels and keep your level headed and chilled and I can still work during the afternoons while in the bleak midwinter I would just waste the day craving sleep.

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One supplement I've discovered in the last couple of years is an amino acid - 5-HTP. This stuff you really feel - it's a real mood and energy enhancer but what I really feel with the winter blues is that I just can't be arsed or cope with anything. This really does regulate stress levels and keep your level headed and chilled and I can still work during the afternoons while in the bleak midwinter I would just waste the day craving sleep.

Out of interest, where do you get your 5-HPT from, what brand, cost, doseage? Just curious. Been debating the toss about trying some of this for several months.

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Wensley Dale, Stilton, Cheddar ... yes you guess it Cheese has high amounts in it.

That is worth knowing. Alas, cheese creates too much mucus for myself personally so I tend to avoid it unless it is emmental or leerdammer.

Is it in these cheeses do you know?

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I did a lot of research when the pig flu cam, a lot, and I concluded after MUCH reading that vit D is a winner.

Internet is full of info and very little research will bear fruit.

FWIW though, I did a lot and am 100% about the benefits.

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