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TylerDurden

Charity Rant

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Ok, I'm going to have a rant now. Feel free to correct me if any of my views are incorrect.

It has now got to the stage where almost every single day I come home from work to find the packets of bags from charity's sitting on my doorstep.

I noticed today how it's become an automatic bend/swipe/throw into the recycling bin. I no longer even read who there from or when they shall be collecting. (This is due to once filling two bags and leaving them outside never to be collected, However I never gave it a second chance to find if this is the norm?).

So does anyone care to hazzard a guess on just how much this must be costing the economy?? I've no idea but I'm guessing most end up in the bin or recycling plant. Which costs money. I bet the landfills are absolutely brimming with these bags of plastic. Plastic that will never dissapear, or will cost taxpayers money to recycle into more bags to be unwantedly shoved through our letterboxes to complete the cycle.

The big bins in shopping centre carparks where you take your gear along and decide which charity to help out seems by far the best way to do this. Who are these crazy dingbats wandering around my estate every single day shoving rubbish through my letter box. Do they get payed? do they volunteer? I can't think of a less rewarding way to volunteer your time.

I get equally as annoyed with the flyers, but at least they're relatively harmless to create and dispose of. They wouldn't sit around in landfills for a thousand years, advertising charities that had no intension of collecting your unwanted old t-shirts.

Am I really the only one who this winds up???

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last time we had chairty colleciton bags in our street they forgot to collect on the appointed date and we ended up with all the belongings strewn around the street by foxes and cats

elderly neighbour spent a good hour going up and down the street clearing all the crap up and putting it in the bin - he told me when I saw him after work

useless c*nts

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I believe many round my way are fake, and the stuff ends up on ebay, market stalls or exported and sold in the 3rd world. Have you seen the state of some of the people and vans collecting the bags?

Judgemental view coming up: They don't look like charity workers to me, although they DO look like they may be doing community service.

I chuck most of them away as well. Some I keep to put oily / paint-soaked rags or wallpaper in after DIY.

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I believe many round my way are fake, and the stuff ends up on ebay, market stalls or exported and sold in the 3rd world. Have you seen the state of some of the people and vans collecting the bags?

Judgemental view coming up: They don't look like charity workers to me, although they DO look like they may be doing community service.

I chuck most of them away as well. Some I keep to put oily / paint-soaked rags or wallpaper in after DIY.

It's a fantastic business model, get all your stock for the cost of a plastic bag and a leaflet. Nothing to do with my idea of a charity but a great business all the same.

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In the name of God... Please... HOW??

Very difficult, the other day I caught a culprit red handed, said "can you read?"...then I thought why waste my breath. ;)

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Very difficult, the other day I caught a culprit red handed, said "can you read?"...then I thought why waste my breath. ;)

I tried that once - and the rather predictable reply was "No" (and the bugger wouldn't take the crap back.)

More irritating in my opinion are those bloody betterware catalogue. Not only do you have to pick them up and throw them away, but then the damn person sticking them through the door sticks notes through the letter box and knocks on the door at all hours to get them back.

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I tried that once - and the rather predictable reply was "No" (and the bugger wouldn't take the crap back.)

More irritating in my opinion are those bloody betterware catalogue. Not only do you have to pick them up and throw them away, but then the damn person sticking them through the door sticks notes through the letter box and knocks on the door at all hours to get them back.

:lol: I know the ones you mean, they push a note through the letterbox almost accusing you of sealing it if not left in the plastic bag on the doorstep where they left it without permission....I don't like unsolicited rubbish left where not wanted, thank you very much. ;)

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We've had several pieces of crap from a local "avon lady". Not quite sure what they are, but I thought they were something from the past, like tupperware parties. I noticed it because one note (possibly the first) was one of those "we tried to call but you were out" things, and looked legitimate until I'd wasted the time to read it. They go in the recycling box, of course.

Anyone take the trouble to post back junkmail with "return to sender"? Too lazy myself, but the parents at least sometimes do it.

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Most charity shops(I'm a volunteer at one)will be pleased to receive those uncollected empty plastic charity bags..saves us having to buy bin-liners to package large items for customers.(I receive 2 or 3 a week of these things,and have noticed the empty bags are never collected from the doorstep.)

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Rant meet website:

http://www.charitybags.org.uk

"The price fetched by second-hand textiles fluctuates (in a similar way to other commodities such as oil and wheat). As at September 2008, virgin clothes (see definition below) were fetching £600-800 per tonne. This was three times the price of two or three years before.

This rise has caused an increase in the number of commercial collectors in the UK (including misleading and bogus 'charitable' collectors). It's also led to an increase in the theft of bags left out for house-to-house collections."

I know the main problem used to be that the clothes were just bulk shipped to developing countries, destroying the native clothing manufacturers.

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I use the free bags as rubbish bags.

I put all of the leaflets and junk shoved through my letter box by the posty into the post box at the end of the road. :D

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I put all of the leaflets and junk shoved through my letter box by the posty into the post box at the end of the road. :D

That is one of the best ideas I've heard in ages, I'll start immediately. :ph34r:

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Anyone take the trouble to post back junkmail with "return to sender"? Too lazy myself, but the parents at least sometimes do it.

I do! I find it very satisfying! :)

I think it's doubly satisfying knowing that I'm doing something that, if many people did it, it might help put an end to (or at least reduce) unsolicited junk.

90%+ of junk mail probably ends up in the bin unopened, and even the stuff that is opened (by mistake or otherwise) ends up in the bin anyway. On average, that must increase the cost of taking our waste away.

So... someone sends us huge amounts of crap, and then we're charged for it to be taken away.

By sticking junk mail back into the postal system ('return to sender'), either the sender and/or the Post Office have to pick up the tab. This makes sending junk mail more expensive -- because the Post Office would have to charge more for posting it (knowing they would be going to deliver all junk mail twice) and the sender would have to pay commercial waste disposal rates to try to get rid of it.

It should be a legal requirement that all unsolicited post should bear the sender's return address. Most does seem to, but not all -- leading me to believe that it's not currently a requirement.

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What would put an end to it is people not putting clothes in them. I never have any even if I was inclined to leave them out. My clothes are either still used or too fallen apart for anyone to want them anyway. I suppose they might be expecting just piles of children's clothes.

The bags go straight in the bin. Not the recycling; I've just about given up bothering doing that since the council went wheely bin beserk, complete with impossible-to-remember schedule.

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I use the free bags as rubbish bags.

I put all of the leaflets and junk shoved through my letter box by the posty into the post box at the end of the road. :D

Nice touch!

Charity bags are a good size for shredded documents I find. About half go straight in the bin and on to landfill...

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Pity that junk mail with prepaid reply envelopes to encourage you to reply has more of less vanished (I assume; I generally don't bother looking in it to see). I once hear of someone taping them to bricks to send them back.

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I don't mind the bags, they are quite inoffensive in themselves.

Unlike, Eastern Eurpoean door to door chuggers for charities you've never heard of :angry:

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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