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And It Possibly Stops .....

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It seems that the view commonly held here that the media has driven the property frenzy is finally entering the mainstream.

About time too.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/bbc/8117986/BBC-has-one-year-to-improve-formulaic-and-derivative-TV-channels.html

The BBC Trust, which scrutinises the corporation’s output on behalf of the licence fee payer, said daytime television on the BBC had become too dominated by shows about "collectables hunting and property".

Although it did not identify specific programmes, daytime BBC shows such as Bargain Hunt, Escape to the Country, Cash in the Attic and Homes Under the Hammer are likely to be at risk in the wake of the report.

The Trust also said that BBC One needed to show more "range, variety and surprise" in its early evening programming.

"Some viewers believe parts of the schedule on each channel lack quality and have become too weighted towards… ‘collectables hunting’ and property," said the Trust.

"Audiences have told us that their quantity makes some parts of the BBC’s daytime schedule seem too formulaic and derivative."

Instead, the Trust wants the BBC to do more current affairs and drama during daytime. The review is also likely to spell the end of American repeats such as Diagnosis Murder and Murder, She Wrote.

The report criticised the lack of "fresh and new" programmes in the early evening on BBC One, saying that the channel had broadcast only 61 different programme titles between 7pm and 9pm in 2009 - down from 115 in 2005.

Some of this drop can be attributed to the establishment of The One Show in its five-day-a-week slot at 7pm.

But the Trust said that distinctive new shows, such as science magazine Bang Goes the Theory, are too few and far between.

“We would expect to see signs of improvement in audience perceptions by the end of 2011 and will consider at that point whether we need to ask for further action from BBC management to address audience concerns,” said the Trust.

The Trust also said that it was prepared to see BBC Two’s ratings continue to fall in exchange for more original programmes on the channel, citing Rev and Grandma’s House as successful recent examples of BBC Two comedy.

BBC Four, the corporation’s most intellectual TV channel, must refocus on arts, music and culture, as well as its successful one-off dramas such as Enid and American imports such as Mad Men. “We see the main challenge for BBC Four over the coming years as being to increase the impact it delivers, particularly in its core areas of specialism,” said the Trust.

The report also said that BBC Four should show less comedy and entertainment shows, such as The Thick of It and We Need Answers.

“Our research shows that audiences demand more from the BBC, with viewers looking for ideas they can’t find anywhere else,” said Diane Coyle, a BBC trustee. “The [bBC] executive needs to be more ambitious and take more creative risks to satisfy viewers’ expectations.”

BBC management argued that progress is already being made.

“The Trust has asked us to build on the strong performances of BBC One, Two and Four to deliver even more fresh and new content to our audiences,” said Jana Bennett, the BBC’s head of television. “Programmes such as Wallace & Gromit’s World Of Inventions, Five Daughters and The Trip are clear examples of our renewed commitment to this kind of programming.”

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Running the test card all afternoon may have been a little boring but at least it didn't contribute to the destruction of a country's economy.

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Running the test card all afternoon may have been a little boring but at least it didn't contribute to the destruction of a country's economy.

I think Andy Pandy was possibly gay. Bill and Ben without doubt. As for the Little Weed?

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There's enough rubbish on freeview that those that much watch television in the day are catered for. Why can't the BBC either run educational programmes or nothing at all?

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"range, variety and surprise"

- wow they are auctioning garages and a 4 bed property property in Taunton this week...

- wow they have a young couple and a pair of retired teachers on the show...

- wow the estate agent has managed to value it at £600,000! Wow!

---

The property porn, is something I have been warning about on HPC for years. They're utter idiots or VIs who have turned a blind eye.

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It just goes to show how powerful media and the continual broadcasting of propaganda is, on a nation. The reins of power must be given to responsible, accountable people who must declare their vested interests!

If the theme was promoting the enlightenment of beastiality, instead, god forbid what kind of nation we would be now.

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Recently Sarah Beeny had the gaul to suggest that her Channel4 show Property Ladder had played no part in the ramping of property during the boom.

Regardless, every minute Property Ladder was shown was a minute less other programming ideas were denied an opportunity of entering the public psyche. Why for instance are there so few programmes aimed at encouraging enterprise, public understanding of the law or programmes that encourage the computer illiterate? (The BBC used to show programmes such as "On The Move" which addressed adult illiteracy).

If Beeny was right that Property Ladder played no part in the property boom, then why do companies pay to advertise?

All that Bargain Hunt, Escape to the Country, Cash in the Attic and Homes Under the Hammer ever did was to encourage a something-for-nothing culture; parasitic, short-term, short-sighted shameless money-grabbing; these were shows that encouraged the self-entitled I-don't-need-to-work-to-make-a-decent-living spiv-cum-rentier mentality that has sunk the country.

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Running the test card all afternoon may have been a little boring but at least it didn't contribute to the destruction of a country's economy.

ooooof

harsh, but fair

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So the food programs are ok?

In a nation of obese people it's probably not ok...

The other channels have loads of stuff

"hobby programs" - the sort of stuff where someone builds a kit car

I don't imagine a knitting club would be *that* interesting though - but you never know.

I think more garden programs - about gardening for beginners might be useful but something that's not so naff as gardener's world (although the nutters growing exhibition veg show was fantastic)

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Not sure when it started as I'm out doing stuff at the weekends normally but they now have this stuff on Saturday and Sunday during the morning.

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Why for instance are there so few programmes aimed at encouraging enterprise

That's a good point. Seen very little on TV about people starting their own business etc...

Except for the likes of Dragons Den/Apprentice - but that is pure entertainment. Well it's supposed to be anyway.

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That's a good point. Seen very little on TV about people starting their own business etc...

Except for the likes of Dragons Den/Apprentice - but that is pure entertainment. Well it's supposed to be anyway.

Each passing series has been more to catch the wider audience... dumbing both down until Duncan Bannatyne is a parody of himself.

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So the food programs are ok?

In a nation of obese people it's probably not ok...

The other channels have loads of stuff

"hobby programs" - the sort of stuff where someone builds a kit car

I don't imagine a knitting club would be *that* interesting though - but you never know.

I think more garden programs - about gardening for beginners might be useful but something that's not so naff as gardener's world (although the nutters growing exhibition veg show was fantastic)

We need more programs on how to save money not spend it...such as how to cook good healthy food for a family for under £5 about buying in season, how to cook in bulk, freeze and preserve. How to save money on heating and cooking....or how basic cheap things such as vinegar, bicarbonate of soda, borax powder, salt etc can replace expensive cleaners.

More on good ethical companies and their products.

More on how to grow your own food without spending too much, where to buy the seed and soil and fertilizer, more about composting and recycling.

Less of ramping up property, celebrities and overpriced luxury....more of how to live on less and feel better for it both in a healthy way and in a financial way. ;)

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So the food programs are ok?

In a nation of obese people it's probably not ok...

The other channels have loads of stuff

"hobby programs" - the sort of stuff where someone builds a kit car

I don't imagine a knitting club would be *that* interesting though - but you never know.

I think more garden programs - about gardening for beginners might be useful but something that's not so naff as gardener's world (although the nutters growing exhibition veg show was fantastic)

There's endless possibilities for potential highly-constructive non-property TV programming; one excellent source of material could be to consider what is Britain's vision for the future? What does the country want to achieve and when does it want to achieve it? What kind of a nation does the British public want Britain to become? How will it achieve those aims? We can't change the weather, but apart from that, the future is ours to make.

Where are TV programmes on philosophical debate and social morality etc? Where are the programmes that raise awareness among the public of the success of other countries and consider how the UK might learn from them?

There may very well be programmes like this buried deep somewhere in the schedules but until they are shown peak time on the mainstream channels the public will remain ignorant of the nation's catastrophic predicament and bereft of alternatives ways of conducting the UK's affairs and of the prerequisites for implementing them.

Even if these concepts were to be implemented, given the extent of emigration, the plethora of TV channels and the popularity of the internet, it may already be too late to effect change by way of TV as has happened in decades gone by.

Edited by Dave Spart

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One thing that drives me up the phucing wall ,is the stretching out of multiple stories across the same programme

and never getting to the tedious end of a tedious bit of lightweight drivel+ endlessly repeating what has just

happened.

I only watch Cowboy Movies and Sport now.

BS

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Hmm. Tough call. I certainly don't want to be seen to defend the likes of the awful Kirsty Allsopp et al but I see these god-awful property programs as the symptom of a bubble, not the cause. Especially in Britain, where property ownership has bordered on a national obsession - due in no small part to the poor standard of rights assigned to tenants in rental properties.

Ultimately the BBC can broadcast as much property porn crap as it likes, and the bovine crowds will, I'm sure, lap it up. But then again, there's been vapid shite like "lifestyles of the rich and famous" on TV for decades. Whilst this might form an aspirational focal point for a financially illiterate, bored housewife with poor taste, it is, in and of itself, not a problem.

It is credit availability that is the real poison. If the banks weren't prepared to lend a sum 12 times one's (self-certified) salary at 125% load-to-value, and mitigate default risk on this dangerous level of consumer debt by repackaging it as investment-grade securities for big institutional investors (probably including your pension fund), then people wouldn't have been able to raise the finance required to cause property inflation. Liar Loans! (for E.P.)

It doesn't help that the financial services industry has given itself such an atrocious reputation (equitable life, Maxwell / mirror group pension fund, endowment fund mis-selling, etc. etc. etc. etc. etc...) over the years that no-one with half a brain trusts them or the consistently shitty, over-priced tat "products" they peddle. They are sharks that prey on the gullible and we all know it.

It doesn't help that regulation was totally ******ed up by Gordon Brown by his introduction of the infamous "tripartite" system whereby no-one knew what the ****** the other was supposed to be doing. Regulators need teeth, and the FSA was a toothless tiger, unfit for purpose.

It doesn't help that the labour government inexplicably gave such generous terms to the Buy-to-Let property speculation crowd.

It doesn't help that persistent central bank meddling by keeping interest rates too low for too long in order to staunch the effects of earlier financial mishaps (LTCM / Asia crash,, dot-com collapse etc.). To be fair, the US Fed led by Alan Greenspan was by far the worst offender here; but where the US leads in cheap money, the rest of the world has to follow in order to remain competitive.

It doesn't help that a significant portion of the bailouts (i.e. taxpayer's money) given to the banks to recapitalise themselves has been squandered as a bonus bonanza to their more senior partners. You couldn't make this up: the people responsible for the financial meltdown have gained the most from it. Talk about "moral hazard": It is in the banker's interests to actually do this all over again! This is the sort of stuff that could stoke up lynch mobs, and I wouldn't expect much public sympathy for their victims, Too bad that most of them are living on their multimillion pound yachts moored off the coast of Antigua, sipping a Martini, until the heat dies down.

It doesn't help that we bailed out the insolvent banks in the first place. All the bailouts have achieved is a temporary reprieve; rather than the banks owning worthless investments, the bill has merely been passed to the state. And now, nation states are starting to buckle under the weight of the debt.

We've been flushed down the toilet bowl by a confluence of factors. TV presenters of fetid lifestyle programs are kind of like the tip of the iceberg - like I say, the very public symptom of a bubble. They are no more to blame directly than the ignoramuses that took out mortgages they couldn't afford.

EDIT: Forgot to mention Gordon Brown's idiotic stealth tax on dividends within pensions, making pensions even more uncompetitive compared to alternative investments like property. Sigh. I know where most of the blame lies for the current crisis!

Edited by THEBIGMAN

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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