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The Scotsman Editorial

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Enjoy part of today's Editorial in The Scotsman...

"Keep those very valuable doors locked

For homeowners, today brings good news and bad news. The good news is that in the last quarter average property prices in Scotland rose 5.8 per cent on a year ago to £163,360 - the highest ever recorded. The bad news is that more neds are breaking into those homes. A Scottish government survey shows 13 per cent more homes were broken into and 19 per cent more people reported that valuables had been stolen from them.

House break-ins are one of the more bleak of our economic indicators. When the economy was growing and banks were shelling out credit cards to anything with a pulse, there was less compulsion to do the heavy work of breaking and entering. Now, when the credit shutters are down, unemployment is rising and jobs are scarce, house break-ins are on the rise.

It is scant comfort to the victims that their house has held its value over a period that was never going to be buoyant for house prices. Indeed, the figures from banks and other mortgage providers have turned into a confusing cascade of numbers and trends. Recent surveys have pointed to a distinct softening of prices. But the latest survey, from the Registers of Scotland, is the definitive work, based on local authority areas across the country, and the figures are independently audited.

For home owners, the trends may be quite unrelated but the lesson to be drawn is the same: do not stint on house security - and make sure those home contents policies are kept up to date"

Predictable take on the stats, but does the Scotsman also have a vested interest in Yale?

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Enjoy part of today's Editorial in The Scotsman...

"Keep those very valuable doors locked

For homeowners, today brings good news and bad news. The good news is that in the last quarter average property prices in Scotland rose 5.8 per cent on a year ago to £163,360 - the highest ever recorded. The bad news is that more neds are breaking into those homes. A Scottish government survey shows 13 per cent more homes were broken into and 19 per cent more people reported that valuables had been stolen from them.

House break-ins are one of the more bleak of our economic indicators. When the economy was growing and banks were shelling out credit cards to anything with a pulse, there was less compulsion to do the heavy work of breaking and entering. Now, when the credit shutters are down, unemployment is rising and jobs are scarce, house break-ins are on the rise.

It is scant comfort to the victims that their house has held its value over a period that was never going to be buoyant for house prices. Indeed, the figures from banks and other mortgage providers have turned into a confusing cascade of numbers and trends. Recent surveys have pointed to a distinct softening of prices. But the latest survey, from the Registers of Scotland, is the definitive work, based on local authority areas across the country, and the figures are independently audited.

For home owners, the trends may be quite unrelated but the lesson to be drawn is the same: do not stint on house security - and make sure those home contents policies are kept up to date"

Predictable take on the stats, but does the Scotsman also have a vested interest in Yale?

What a load of shite.

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OK, let's analyse...

Editorial in The Scotsman...

Keep those very valuable doors locked

House break-ins are one of the more bleak of our economic indicators. - but you've just said yourself that houseprices are at all time high. So all is OK, isnt't it??

When the economy was growing - hello?! it's still growing according the all the official statistics you keep flashing in your paper

Banks were shelling out credit cards, there was less compulsion to do the heavy work of breaking and entering. - so, instead of building prisons we should be handing out more credit cards??? :blink::blink::blink::blink:

Now, when the credit shutters are down, unemployment is rising and jobs are scarce, house break-ins are on the rise. - so, lack of easy credit is causing ALL our problems... That's like saying that the lack of booze is causing hang-overs

The latest survey, from the Registers of Scotland, is the definitive work, based on local authority areas across the country, and the figures are independently audited. - poor John Lennon - should have spoken to RoS instead of writing 'Gimme Some Truth'

Do not stint on house security - and make sure those home contents policies are kept up to date - wow, this last bit sounds like Fitter Happier by Radiohead:

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Does the Scotsman qualify why a rise in house prices is a good thing? They never do, do they. Good for a true owner with no mortgage that is looking at downsizing or emmigrating - or BTLers if you read between the lines, basically. Bad for the vast majority - i.e. everyone else. But nevermind the vast majority of the population that is either renting (or indeed on the social and thus out of it completely), a mortgage debtor or even a good portion of those actual home owners whose 30-something kids are still living at home thanks to the bloated HPI. At least in Scotland, those stay at home kids are not saddled with crippling student debts as well I suppose.

It's the economy stupid. It really is.

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Does the Scotsman qualify why a rise in house prices is a good thing? They never do, do they. Good for a true owner with no mortgage that is looking at downsizing or emmigrating - or BTLers if you read between the lines, basically. Bad for the vast majority - i.e. everyone else. But nevermind the vast majority of the population that is either renting (or indeed on the social and thus out of it completely), a mortgage debtor or even a good portion of those actual home owners whose 30-something kids are still living at home thanks to the bloated HPI. At least in Scotland, those stay at home kids are not saddled with crippling student debts as well I suppose.

It's the economy stupid. It really is.

Neverending House Price Growth is the official religion of Edinburgh.

Those who openly disagree are burnt like witches (i.e. risk social isolation).

Edited by Pole

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Neverending House Price Growth is the official religion of Edinburgh.

Those who openly disagree are burnt like witches (i.e. risk social isolation).

Not now we're well past the mania phase. A new renaissance (new paradigm :P) will strike the witch burners if it hasn't already. How many of the HPI soothsayers in Edinburgh already are living The Emperor's New Clothes for real?

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''For homeowners, today brings good news and bad news. The good news is that in the last quarter average property prices in Scotland rose 5.8 per cent on a year ago to £163,360 - the highest ever recorded.''

This is what people wanted to know.

Dont go off on a tangent about anything else.

We have a winner.

Close the thread.

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Does the Scotsman qualify why a rise in house prices is a good thing? They never do, do they. Good for a true owner with no mortgage that is looking at downsizing or emmigrating - or BTLers if you read between the lines, basically. Bad for the vast majority - i.e. everyone else. But nevermind the vast majority of the population that is either renting (or indeed on the social and thus out of it completely), a mortgage debtor or even a good portion of those actual home owners whose 30-something kids are still living at home thanks to the bloated HPI. At least in Scotland, those stay at home kids are not saddled with crippling student debts as well I suppose.

It's the economy stupid. It really is.

Exactly.

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The NEDS will be disappointed when they break into any house bought after 2004. So much income spent servicing the mortgage that few will have spare cash to put anything of value inside. Apart from the life-essential plasma tv and games console.... :rolleyes:

Fur coat and nae knickers :P

Any NED with 1/10th of a brain should get a copy of the LR report and target only pre-2004 tenants. Those crap new build slave boxes just ain't worth the hassle. B)

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Any NED with 1/10th of a brain should get a copy of the LR report and target only pre-2004 tenants. Those crap new build slave boxes just ain't worth the hassle. B)

but they were all built on the cheap....makes them easier to get into - simples

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The NEDS will be disappointed when they break into any house bought after 2004. So much income spent servicing the mortgage that few will have spare cash to put anything of value inside. Apart from the life-essential plasma tv and games console.... :rolleyes:

Fur coat and nae knickers :P

Any NED with 1/10th of a brain should get a copy of the LR report and target only pre-2004 tenants. Those crap new build slave boxes just ain't worth the hassle. B)

You speak from your own, bad experience don't you? :D

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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