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Did You Turn Up To Work Today And Found Out It Was Deserted?

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http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/8485421.80_jobs_under_threat_as_bailiffs_raid_Boyes_Conning_freight_site/

BAILIFFS have raided the site of a collapsed Hampshire freight business Boyes Conning leaving the future of more than 80 staff still working there on a knife-edge.

In a bid to recover estimated debts of £250,000 owed to the landlord of the site, bailiffs took over the premises of Boyes Conning in West End and turned away stunned staff when they arrived at work yesterday morning.

Latest : http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/8486539.Staff_wait_for_news_on_jobs_at_troubled_Boyes_Conning/

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Would have done one morning a couple of years ago if I hadn't flicked on the news. Saved me a journey up the A23.

More flippantly: yeah, this morning I did, although most of them appear to have flu / are skiving / are managers.

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Just today I spoke to a lorry driver in the south. Trouble with reduced hours and divorce, but he's getting more overtime and is able to service debt.

I asked him if things were looking up generally: "No, lots of trucking firms closing up. Don't have the money anymore."

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Transport firms are going bust left, right and centre at the moment. If the punters aren't taking it out of the front of the store, we aren't taking into the back of the store.

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Not enough facts to see what the angle is here but it seems like the landlord's must either have a new tenant lined up or be very stupid/naive.

I can't see how they think sending bailiffs to re-enter would be a good play.

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Transport firms are going bust left, right and centre at the moment. If the punters aren't taking it out of the front of the store, we aren't taking into the back of the store.

Were talking about second-hand truck prices being through the floor recently.

All of a sudden, this week, we've had numerous truck dealers ringing up asking if we've got any disposals and offering top money.

Which is surprising as firms are obviously still going bust.

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Were talking about second-hand truck prices being through the floor recently.

Which is surprising as firms are obviously still going bust.

Are cost savings from new substantial? Linked to the increasing price of fuel?

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Not enough facts to see what the angle is here but it seems like the landlord's must either have a new tenant lined up or be very stupid/naive.

I can't see how they think sending bailiffs to re-enter would be a good play.

maybe the landlord had this done to him by his bank

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Are cost savings from new substantial? Linked to the increasing price of fuel?

Yes, the price of tractor units is on the floor at the moment, if you want one, just phone Close Asset Finance, they have a field-full of them at Arundel.

A new Volvo FH12 would be around £70,000 depending on spec, a five-year-old one would go for around £15,000. Had the recession not arrived, a five-year-old tractor unit would be worth about £23,000.

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Were talking about second-hand truck prices being through the floor recently.

All of a sudden, this week, we've had numerous truck dealers ringing up asking if we've got any disposals and offering top money.

Which is surprising as firms are obviously still going bust.

The dealers' clients are the ones who secured credit/built up cash at the right time and are now the chosen ones in a shrinking market?

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Transport firms are going bust left, right and centre at the moment. If the punters aren't taking it out of the front of the store, we aren't taking into the back of the store.

True...but where do you think people get the money from anymore...the rich have everything they require, the rest of us if we are thinking of the future and want more for less will look at all options before we buy, do our homework, shop around (you can save a fortune).....the companies that survive will be the ones with little debt and low fixed costs that can adapt quickly, touch many, to offer what people want with the best quality possible, at a price that they can afford with little waste...a fine balancing act. ;)

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A new Volvo FH12 would be around £70,000 depending on spec, a five-year-old one would go for around £15,000. Had the recession not arrived, a five-year-old tractor unit would be worth about £23,000.

The reliability of a 5 year old unit?

I assume these will already have '000s of kms on them, so when is the optimum time to change, before wear and maintenance takes it's increasing toll?

Sounds like people are taking advantage of a percieved 'recovery'?

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Were talking about second-hand truck prices being through the floor recently.

All of a sudden, this week, we've had numerous truck dealers ringing up asking if we've got any disposals and offering top money.

Which is surprising as firms are obviously still going bust.

Perhaps some foreigners have bought a few from a truck dealer? If there is no QE this week maybe they think sterling will be on an upper?

Edited by Redhat Sly

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The reliability of a 5 year old unit?

I assume these will already have '000s of kms on them, so when is the optimum time to change, before wear and maintenance takes it's increasing toll?

Sounds like people are taking advantage of a percieved 'recovery'?

It's a risk you take......take insurance, you either pay it out each month and never use it so lose it, or save it each month you will always have it to use even if you don't use it or if you do need it a small top-up may or may not be required. ;)

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The reliability of a 5 year old unit?

I assume these will already have '000s of kms on them, so when is the optimum time to change, before wear and maintenance takes it's increasing toll?

Most container companies run tractor units for two years then sell them on. During this period they have full manufacturer back-up.

After this they are generally reliable for another 2 years or so, they tend to suffer problems at around five years old (clutches and turbochargers generally fail at about this age).

Their downfall is that they will be less fuel-efficient than a new unit, even 0.1 mpg means a lot if you do 50-60 thousand miles a year.

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Perhaps some foreigners have bought a few from a truck dealer? If there is no QE this week maybe they think sterling will be on an upper?

They all go abroad eventually, you will rarely see a "breaker's yard for trucks"

I took this pic in the Gambia a couple of years ago.

PHOT0022.jpg

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The reliability of a 5 year old unit?

I assume these will already have '000s of kms on them, so when is the optimum time to change, before wear and maintenance takes it's increasing toll?

Sounds like people are taking advantage of a percieved 'recovery'?

Trucks are constantly maintained and are built to last. A five year old truck with 400,000kms would still have loads of life left.

In most cases a lot of fleet operators like us were disposing too quickly when trucks were lasting much longer. We've got '06s with 300k plus which is the sort of stock dealers would be looking to buy but we will probably keep them on fleet and I doubt they'll be any significant extra cost because of this.

Historically, we'd want to dispose before there were any major driveline failures or work required that we weren't equipped to do in our own workshop. Corrosion is the real eventual truck killer though.

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Perhaps some foreigners have bought a few from a truck dealer? If there is no QE this week maybe they think sterling will be on an upper?

Brummie truck dealer (who was a bit in the considerably richer than yow, mould) told me a while back how that Nigerians were turning up with carrier bags full of cash buying trucks. Quite picky though, only taking quite new Scanias.

For some reason people are obsessed Scanias are fantastic and worth some huge premium over other makes. Having had most makes, and driven quite a few of them, I've never seen it really.

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Trucks are constantly maintained and are built to last. A five year old truck with 400,000kms would still have loads of life left.

In most cases a lot of fleet operators like us were disposing too quickly when trucks were lasting much longer. We've got '06s with 300k plus which is the sort of stock dealers would be looking to buy but we will probably keep them on fleet and I doubt they'll be any significant extra cost because of this.

Historically, we'd want to dispose before there were any major driveline failures or work required that we weren't equipped to do in our own workshop. Corrosion is the real eventual truck killer though.

... keep them clean and well maintained....it takes years off them. ;)

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In most cases a lot of fleet operators like us were disposing too quickly when trucks were lasting much longer. We've got '06s with 300k plus which is the sort of stock dealers would be looking to buy but we will probably keep them on fleet and I doubt they'll be any significant extra cost because of this.

Everybody is keeping trucks longer than they used to.

That alone should tell you something about the economy.

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... keep them clean and well maintained....it takes years off them. ;)

It's more because it's a legal requirement they have frequent safety inspections and that any defects drivers report have to be rectified. Theoretically, it's only road safety defects that need to be rectified but, certainly in the better times everything was getting done.

I think it was noticeable that as the recession bit things like the plastic sun-visor that wraps around the exterior of the cab and other plastic fairings were getting smashed and scraped by drivers and not being replaced.

Making sure they're thoroughly washed after they've been out on salted roads would certainly make them last if you were planning to keep them a long time.

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It's more because it's a legal requirement they have frequent safety inspections and that any defects drivers report have to be rectified.

Making sure they're thoroughly washed after they've been out on salted roads would certainly make them last if you were planning to keep them a long time.

I have noticed more 'layby' VOSA inspections recently than during the good times.

Also when taking them to the VOSA test centre for 'plating' they have to be clean.

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I think it was noticeable that as the recession bit things like the plastic sun-visor that wraps around the exterior of the cab and other plastic fairings were getting smashed and scraped by drivers and not being replaced.

Same as when you walk into Reception and you notice they haven't got the fish tank any more.

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Everybody is keeping trucks longer than they used to.

That alone should tell you something about the economy.

Consumer demand certainly isn't anything like 2007 levels but, I think with some of this 2nd hand stuff there's supply and demand element going on. Truck prices definitely do seemed to have bounced back all of a sudden. I was being offered effectively £5k more for the same age and mileage trucks than I was a year ago.

Also, in our business, things like prices for baled waste cardboard and plastic are getting back up to where they were again.

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It's more because it's a legal requirement they have frequent safety inspections and that any defects drivers report have to be rectified. Theoretically, it's only road safety defects that need to be rectified but, certainly in the better times everything was getting done.

I think it was noticeable that as the recession bit things like the plastic sun-visor that wraps around the exterior of the cab and other plastic fairings were getting smashed and scraped by drivers and not being replaced.

Making sure they're thoroughly washed after they've been out on salted roads would certainly make them last if you were planning to keep them a long time.

If you look after something it will look after you....seriously, if I were looking for a removal firm or even looking for a heating engineer, if their van or truck was dirty and unkempt how would I think their quality and excellence of service be?....just a thought. ;)

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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