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The Masked Tulip

Why Are Kenco Eco-Refill Pouches More Expensive Than The Jars?

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I have noticed that the much advertised eco-refill pouches for Kenco coffee - the aim being that you re-use your coffee jars by buying your coffee in these pouches - is often more expensive than buying the stuff in jars?

I just thought that I would share. You would assume they would be much cheaper wouldn't you?

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Many products are sold in confusing packaging in order to take advantage of the fact that a significant proportion (possibly the majority) of consumers don't check the price per lb/kg before they buy something. Our grandmothers in their heyday would have been horrified by the widespread lack of price awareness in modern consumers.

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Many products are sold in confusing packaging in order to take advantage of the fact that a significant proportion (possibly the majority) of consumers don't check the price per lb/kg before they buy something. Our grandmothers in their heyday would have been horrified by the widespread lack of price awareness in modern consumers.

I saw this a few weeks ago in M&S. I was looking at a pack of bread-coated breast fillets. They had a special offer on 2 small packs for X which, altough less combined eight than a large pack, were more expensive than the large pack.

A woman picked up two packs and me, being a numpty, thought that I would point out to her that the lager pack was both cheaper and contained more weight. She looked at me as if I had asked her to perform a sex act in the aisle before walking off with the 2 smaller more expensive packs.

I don't even like bread-coated chicken fillets.

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My pet hate is the key deal price cycle

28 Days at full price (which is double every where else)

28 days plus ..........two for the price of one

28 days special offer ...Half PRICE BUY NOW ...LIMITED OFFER (never run out of stock )

repeat Ad nauseam

...quality street tins are a good example ...Lidl stable-ish at £4.99 ..Sainsburys anywhere between £10.99 to £5.99 depending on the full moon ...I think

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I saw this a few weeks ago in M&S. I was looking at a pack of bread-coated breast fillets. They had a special offer on 2 small packs for X which, altough less combined eight than a large pack, were more expensive than the large pack.

A woman picked up two packs and me, being a numpty, thought that I would point out to her that the lager pack was both cheaper and contained more weight. She looked at me as if I had asked her to perform a sex act in the aisle before walking off with the 2 smaller more expensive packs.

I don't even like bread-coated chicken fillets.

That is funny on so many levels.

:D:D:D:D

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What annoys me more than anything is the moronic childish advertising that accompanies the Kenco refill.

People acting like complete idiots trying to carry coffee in their hands etc. It is so dumbed down I will definitely not buy this product.

Another one is the equally absurd Uncle Bens rice advert where the weirdo has to talk to the microvave.

Which smart **** idiot ad company dreams these up?

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As this is morfing into a 'supermarket offers' thread, however about fireworks in supermarkets? It's before bonfire night and they're on buy one get one free!

Why don't they just sell them at half price. The fact that they're all shit don't help the cause, it's all such a con!

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Many products are sold in confusing packaging in order to take advantage of the fact that a significant proportion (possibly the majority) of consumers don't check the price per lb/kg before they buy something. Our grandmothers in their heyday would have been horrified by the widespread lack of price awareness in modern consumers.

+1 you have to have your wits about you when shopping for example, say a packet of bacon may look better value for money because it is cheaper and has more rashers but the weight is 220g when the other at 250g works out cheaper £ for £ or g for g....if you get my meaning. ;)

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A mate has started using the Starbucks Via pouches - little plastic sleeves of "instant and microground coffee" at about 50 pence a portion; they taste good but I calculated that a jar of it would be - when compared to Sainsburys 100g instant coffee at around £1.60 odd a jar - £23!

I refrained from mentioning that the money saved by buying the bog standard instant could go towards his £10k student loan :(

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It's more expensive because Kraft think people will pay a premium for it.

I used to use the example of squeezy ketchup bottles in oneofmy materials lectures to illustrate how materials processing could add value to products. Heinz ketchup that comes in cheap squeezy plastic bottles is more expensive than ketchup in a glass bottle.

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+1 you have to have your wits about you when shopping for example, say a packet of bacon may look better value for money because it is cheaper and has more rashers but the weight is 220g when the other at 250g works out cheaper £ for £ or g for g....if you get my meaning. ;)

I belied that anything in a pack qualifies for VAT, whereas loose does not

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+1 you have to have your wits about you when shopping for example, say a packet of bacon may look better value for money because it is cheaper and has more rashers but the weight is 220g when the other at 250g works out cheaper £ for £ or g for g....if you get my meaning. ;)

I actually count the number of rashers per pack and note the thickness.

Edit:

I am a bundle of joy on a date.

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It's more expensive because Kraft think people will pay a premium for it.

I used to use the example of squeezy ketchup bottles in oneofmy materials lectures to illustrate how materials processing could add value to products. Heinz ketchup that comes in cheap squeezy plastic bottles is more expensive than ketchup in a glass bottle.

Only buy Heinz Ketchup when it is on BOGOF deals.

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I saw this a few weeks ago in M&S. I was looking at a pack of bread-coated breast fillets. They had a special offer on 2 small packs for X which, altough less combined eight than a large pack, were more expensive than the large pack.

A woman picked up two packs and me, being a numpty, thought that I would point out to her that the lager pack was both cheaper and contained more weight. She looked at me as if I had asked her to perform a sex act in the aisle before walking off with the 2 smaller more expensive packs.

I don't even like bread-coated chicken fillets.

definitely a microcosm to explain general innumeracy and resistance to a challenge to world views

I had a similar argument with a relative about yields on Lake District properdies, and he moaned and walked away.

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Don't Tesco label all their items by the cost per gram/volume, etc..? It makes it easier to compare what's value for money...

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Our local Carrefour here in France sells Leerdammer cheese slices in 3 different weights (6 10 and 14 slice packs). The packs are the same size. 3 different prices per kilo. The most expensive being the 10 slice pack, the cheapest (by 20%) is the 14 slice pack.

Buying the 14 slice pack is cheaper than buying a cut of the same cheese from the counter and cutting yourself.

Madness. :blink:

The supermarkets play on the premise they give more choice. It really is an exercise in marketing / confusion to extract the most money possible from the consumer's pocket. Nothing more, nothing less.

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Don't Tesco label all their items by the cost per gram/volume, etc..? It makes it easier to compare what's value for money...

Yes, this is one of the things that makes it all so ridiculous. No need for mental arithmetic, just redirect your vision 8mm lower to the £/kg Tesco has kindly printed for you underneath the price!

Many people are too lazy or full of themselves to bother saving money by shopping intelligently. My feeling is this is just how people are at the end of a 15 year long boom. A bit of austerity and HPC and they will be quoting vegetable prices per kilo at dinner parties.

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I actually count the number of rashers per pack and note the thickness.

Edit:

I am a bundle of joy on a date.

arf ...your underpants must explode when you hit the bacon steak's section

I'm happy to pay extra for the lower water content ....Most is around 13% water ..(which means the shop gets a freebie 100% profit in every 9 packs, supplied by the water board ).....cheap dry cures are around 6% ....but sometimes you can get 104% original pork by weight of the cured product ......water has been extracted...

The difference is in the frying ....87% pork poaches in its own juices and leaves a white scum ... A proper dry cure will fry properly , and no scum ....much better taste

Edit;

You have.... dates ?

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The Kenco refill packs contain 150 grams, I think the jars only contain 100 grams (haven't got one so I can't check - but we have a similar size Dowe Egberts and that is 100 gram).

Does this help or is it too simplistic ?

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  • 141 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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