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Canada To Cornwall, Maybe...


Canada Bob
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Yes I'm struggling to make sense of this idea, but as I don't know what the area of Canada he is leaving is like, maybe it does make some sense. Perhaps it's dull and cold like the worse towns of South Island NZ.

I presume Canada Bob is leaving friends behind in Canada as well. Retiring to somewhere where they don't know anyone and the locals are notoriously clannish, hmmmm. I would definitely steer well clear of all the small Cornish villages/towns and stick to Truro or Exeter, especially as his wife doesn't drive.

These are the only reasons I can think of for moving to Cornwall :-

1. It's physically lovely, no doubt about that, and I like the temperate climate, though perhaps a little less rain would be nice.

2. One thing we have that doesn't exist so much in other countries(no idea about Canada) is the wonderful network of paths and trails and rights of way. Great for walkers and mountain bikers. In the Cornish climate a hardy retired person can go for a walk 365 days a year.

3. Some sort of attachment to the land of ones birth, that special smell of coastal Cornwall makes you feel like you're on holiday all the time if you went there as a kid.

4. At retirement age he won't be surfing, so that's about it!

Canada must be really really dull is all I can guess!

Hello Swissy...

As mentioned in earlier posts it's an emotional decision rather than a logical/rational decision, one that we will have to be careful we don't live to regret. As for what Canada is like, well {where to start}, we have lived in 4 of the 10 Provinces, Ontario, Quebec, Prince Edward Island and for the last 20 years or so in Nova Scotia. Hard to describe what Canada is like as there's so much of it, not just the 5 and a half time zones but although many folks think of Canada being "up North" most Canadians live on a Latitude that is approximately the same as the South of France, and from that we get the Summers that go with that latitude, hence the grape growing / wine industry that thrives here, coast to coast almost...

Much of Canada is also closer to the Equator than it is to the North Pole {thankfully}, but Winter don't close anyone down, the snow is so cold at say -20C that it's as dry as dandruff and falls off you just as easily, the roads {once ploughed} are almost as easy to drive as in Summertime. Sports and pastimes change, ice fishing takes over from taking the boat out, cross country and downhill skiing take over from softball etc, and again it's a blue collar sport, it doesn't have an effete {San Moritzy} connection or connotation at all.

One thing you can count on though is, Winter is Winter and Summer is Summer, although not every Province gets snow {worth mentioning} in Winter, for the most part you can count on -30C in Winter but +30C in Summer. Summers tend to be very dry too, you can go 6-10 weeks and not see much rain if any at all, so you know where you are with the weather, no surprises on that score.

As for friends here, sure, we would be leaving them behind, but we did live in the UK for 30+ years, and although all of my clan is dead and gorn, the wife still has cousins etc living in the {North of} the UK. One thing I've learned is that although friends can be an important part of your life don't let that hold you back from seeing a bit of the world, for the most part {depending on your ability to be outgoing} you'll soon find friends no matter where you go.

Back to "life in Canada" I can't say enough about it, there really is "something for everyone", and if there is a noticeable difference between the UK and Canada I'd say that {say} in Sports more folks tend to participate rather than spectate. You'd be amazed at how many soccer leagues there are over here, not just for kiddies or teenagers but right through to "Seniors Leagues", same thing with Baseball/Softball etc, it's not just parents going watching the kids play, it's parents or folks 20-40 going out after supper {tea time} and playing softball or baseball. It's not just what we would perceive as "American" sports either, there's a fair bit of cricket, football, rugby played even Lawn Bowls, and although not {yet} at the top International level these sports are well supported.

Add to the above fishing {as ever} has many participants, there's no "Private Stretches" so for about $20 a Fishing License gives you the right to fish "anywhere" in Canada, including on or from Private Property, {no one fights over ownership of Land here}.

Sailing is also a blue collar sport, not one of the lads I left back home owns a boat, lots of the lads I know over here own boats, might just be a canoe or a kayak for some of them, but many own sailboats or motor boats, the working man lives well over here.

I'm sure that I'm forgetting many other sports that Canadians take part in {rather than just simply watch}, but the above are the ones that I took part in. I should maybe mention tennis and golf which are again "available to all" without having to pay extortionate prices to join a club. As an example, we live on Glen Arbour {see the link below} an estate built around a really nice Golf Club where every person who lives on the estate {around 400 of us} gets a free life time membership, you just pay the green fees. I guess this just shows that the developers recognize that folks like to get involved in one sport or another when they come home from work.

Glen Arbour

Although like in any sport runners tend to socialize with other runners in my little group over here {age 40-70 ish} there's all sorts of boaters/sailers, including sea kayaker's and canoeists, bow hunters, fishermen, lawn bowlers, a wreck diver and cricketers etc. Bottom line I'd say is that it's not all about work over here, folks take their sports, pastimes and entertainment seriously, and there's lots of it to go around. I've noticed how in the UK want to tell you "where they work and what {important} job they do" in Canada you're more likely to hear what sport they are into, makes for a refreshing change...

There's little if any social stratification too, the guy who owned the first place that I worked at {Mario Fabris} used to play golf and go fishing with the bloke who swept the floor of his factory, things like this opened my eyes to how good/decent a place Canada is.

There are some things you won't find in Canada though, there's not a single Betting Shop in the whole of the country, betting {other than 6/49} simply isn't in their psyche, you won't find a "pie" here either, so being originally from Lancashire that was a bit of shock to the system ;)

Other than the above, there's a good deal of "The Old Country" still alive and well, not just the cricket/rugby etc, there's actually more Pipe Bands in Canada than in Scotland ! Not to mention that every year we have a Gathering of the Clans and Highland Games here in Nova Scotia [see the links below}, including the Halifax Tattoo.

Pipe Bands

Highland Games

Halifax Tattoo

As for Nova Scotia itself, well, the coastline {4,600+ miles of it} is much like the coast of Cornwall, hence the preference to head for Cornwall, the link below should give you a fair idea of what Nova Scotia {New Scotland} is all about...

Nova Scotia

If there was a downside to Canada or any part of it, {excepting for Nunavat}, I'd tell you about it, I'm not one of those blokes who sings the praises of a place just because I live there. To be honest if you're young enough and you have a transportable skill then I don't know a country where you would have a better life. We arrived here 30 years ago with just 2,000 quid, 5 suitcases and our then 9 year old son, if that's not going in at the deep end I don't know what is, there was no Plan B for us, it was sink or swim.

As an ex DeHavilland time served QA Engineer I could {in those days} take my pick of job offers, my wife was an SRN/SCN {Registered Nurse/Midwife} so we both earned decent money practically from the day we got off the boat {the Stefan Batory}.

To be honest although we missed some things, and some folks, family and friends, emigrating to Canada was the best move we ever made, I just hope that swimming back upstream isn't the worst decision we ever make.

Bob.

Edited by Canada Bob
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Bob - give Dorset coast a look as well. Stunning scenery, sailing, kayaking, fishing. You can be in beautiful country just 5 miles from a useful town (Wimborne, Wareham). And only 2 hours from London on rail.

The other thing no one's mentioned is our history. I stroll often on Hengistbury Head, near Bournemouth.

Two thousand years before the Romans arrived (AD43) they were trading from here with the Mediterranean countries.

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You missed the really important point - it has just about enough land for self-sufficiency. You will need to build high security fencing with look out posts etc. but the local population is small enough that you could fight them off with just a couple of machine guns (assuming the Mrs is available). Good climate for soft fruits - keep the scurvy at bay.

LOL, what can I say

Bob.

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Bob - give Dorset coast a look as well. Stunning scenery, sailing, kayaking, fishing. You can be in beautiful country just 5 miles from a useful town (Wimborne, Wareham). And only 2 hours from London on rail.

The other thing no one's mentioned is our history. I stroll often on Hengistbury Head, near Bournemouth.

Two thousand years before the Romans arrived (AD43) they were trading from here with the Mediterranean countries.

Although Cornwall & Devon are the focus of our search nowhere is off the map, so Dorset won't be a non runner. I'll do a Google on the towns mentioned above, thanks for the nod in that direction. As for history, I like stuff like that, puts us in touch {almost} with our heritage. There's a lot of good things you can say about Canada, but history is thin on the ground, and the culture is still developing. The fact of it is, there's pubs in England older than {what you might call} the recorded history of humans in Canada.

Bob.

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Bob - give Dorset coast a look as well. Stunning scenery, sailing, kayaking, fishing. You can be in beautiful country just 5 miles from a useful town (Wimborne, Wareham). And only 2 hours from London on rail.

The other thing no one's mentioned is our history. I stroll often on Hengistbury Head, near Bournemouth.

Two thousand years before the Romans arrived (AD43) they were trading from here with the Mediterranean countries.

interesting - this comment triggered a memory of having read something in a book somewhere about a possible link between the Jews and Druids - Just found this on the web.

http://www.cryaloud.com/joshua_hu_gadarn_druids.htm

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Hello Swissy...

As mentioned in earlier posts it's an emotional decision rather than a logical/rational decision, one that we will have to be careful we don't live to regret. As for what Canada is like, well {where to start}, we have lived in 4 of the 10 Provinces, Ontario, Quebec, Prince Edward Island and for the last 20 years or so in Nova Scotia. Hard to describe what Canada is like as there's so much of it, not just the 5 and a half time zones but although many folks think of Canada being "up North" most Canadians live on a Latitude that is approximately the same as the South of France, and from that we get the Summers that go with that latitude, hence the grape growing / wine industry that thrives here, coast to coast almost...

Much of Canada is also closer to the Equator than it is to the North Pole {thankfully}, but Winter don't close anyone down, the snow is so cold at say -20C that it's as dry as dandruff and falls off you just as easily, the roads {once ploughed} are almost as easy to drive as in Summertime. Sports and pastimes change, ice fishing takes over from taking the boat out, cross country and downhill skiing take over from softball etc, and again it's a blue collar sport, it doesn't have an effete {San Moritzy} connection or connotation at all.

One thing you can count on though is, Winter is Winter and Summer is Summer, although not every Province gets snow {worth mentioning} in Winter, for the most part you can count on -30C in Winter but +30C in Summer. Summers tend to be very dry too, you can go 6-10 weeks and not see much rain if any at all, so you know where you are with the weather, no surprises on that score.

As for friends here, sure, we would be leaving them behind, but we did live in the UK for 30+ years, and although all of my clan is dead and gorn, the wife still has cousins etc living in the {North of} the UK. One thing I've learned is that although friends can be an important part of your life don't let that hold you back from seeing a bit of the world, for the most part {depending on your ability to be outgoing} you'll soon find friends no matter where you go.

Back to "life in Canada" I can't say enough about it, there really is "something for everyone", and if there is a noticeable difference between the UK and Canada I'd say that {say} in Sports more folks tend to participate rather than spectate. You'd be amazed at how many soccer leagues there are over here, not just for kiddies or teenagers but right through to "Seniors Leagues", same thing with Baseball/Softball etc, it's not just parents going watching the kids play, it's parents or folks 20-40 going out after supper {tea time} and playing softball or baseball. It's not just what we would perceive as "American" sports either, there's a fair bit of cricket, football, rugby played even Lawn Bowls, and although not {yet} at the top International level these sports are well supported.

Add to the above fishing {as ever} has many participants, there's no "Private Stretches" so for about $20 a Fishing License gives you the right to fish "anywhere" in Canada, including on or from Private Property, {no one fights over ownership of Land here}.

Sailing is also a blue collar sport, not one of the lads I left back home owns a boat, lots of the lads I know over here own boats, might just be a canoe or a kayak for some of them, but many own sailboats or motor boats, the working man lives well over here.

I'm sure that I'm forgetting many other sports that Canadians take part in {rather than just simply watch}, but the above are the ones that I took part in. I should maybe mention tennis and golf which are again "available to all" without having to pay extortionate prices to join a club. As an example, we live on Glen Arbour {see the link below} an estate built around a really nice Golf Club where every person who lives on the estate {around 400 of us} gets a free life time membership, you just pay the green fees. I guess this just shows that the developers recognize that folks like to get involved in one sport or another when they come home from work.

Glen Arbour

Although like in any sport runners tend to socialize with other runners in my little group over here {age 40-70 ish} there's all sorts of boaters/sailers, including sea kayaker's and canoeists, bow hunters, fishermen, lawn bowlers, a wreck diver and cricketers etc. Bottom line I'd say is that it's not all about work over here, folks take their sports, pastimes and entertainment seriously, and there's lots of it to go around. I've noticed how in the UK want to tell you "where they work and what {important} job they do" in Canada you're more likely to hear what sport they are into, makes for a refreshing change...

There's little if any social stratification too, the guy who owned the first place that I worked at {Mario Fabris} used to play golf and go fishing with the bloke who swept the floor of his factory, things like this opened my eyes to how good/decent a place Canada is.

There are some things you won't find in Canada though, there's not a single Betting Shop in the whole of the country, betting {other than 6/49} simply isn't in their psyche, you won't find a "pie" here either, so being originally from Lancashire that was a bit of shock to the system ;)

Other than the above, there's a good deal of "The Old Country" still alive and well, not just the cricket/rugby etc, there's actually more Pipe Bands in Canada than in Scotland ! Not to mention that every year we have a Gathering of the Clans and Highland Games here in Nova Scotia [see the links below}, including the Halifax Tattoo.

Pipe Bands

Highland Games

Halifax Tattoo

As for Nova Scotia itself, well, the coastline {4,600+ miles of it} is much like the coast of Cornwall, hence the preference to head for Cornwall, the link below should give you a fair idea of what Nova Scotia {New Scotland} is all about...

Nova Scotia

If there was a downside to Canada or any part of it, {excepting for Nunavat}, I'd tell you about it, I'm not one of those blokes who sings the praises of a place just because I live there. To be honest if you're young enough and you have a transportable skill then I don't know a country where you would have a better life. We arrived here 30 years ago with just 2,000 quid, 5 suitcases and our then 9 year old son, if that's not going in at the deep end I don't know what is, there was no Plan B for us, it was sink or swim.

As an ex DeHavilland time served QA Engineer I could {in those days} take my pick of job offers, my wife was an SRN/SCN {Registered Nurse/Midwife} so we both earned decent money practically from the day we got off the boat {the Stefan Batory}.

To be honest although we missed some things, and some folks, family and friends, emigrating to Canada was the best move we ever made, I just hope that swimming back upstream isn't the worst decision we ever make.

Bob.

Er - wow. Thanks for the info.

Don't sell your house in Canada, let it. I really believe you'll be back there as fast as you can!

Cornwall is beautiful, but it has a lot less than Canada going on that writeup.

I've always been put off by the accents(their French is an offence to the ears, English is a bit better) and the -30C winters bit. I have family in Ontario but have never visited them, slightly to my shame.

Juvenal is right by the way, as you're presumably past surfing age, Dorset is well worth a look. Less rain and just as warm. I'd start with Swanage and Wareham, Swanage goes a bit rough for 6 weeks of the year, otherwise it's very nice and is next to some lovely coast. As he said, you can also get to London if your wife needs a bit more culture.

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Er - wow. Thanks for the info.

Can't say enough about Canada to be honest, it's been good to us and to Millions of other, as mentioned Canada takes in at least 250,000 immigrants each and every year, all of whom have to qualify though, you have to have skills or education that Canada needs, but on the other side of the coin those who get here move through the ranks faster than they would have done "back home". There's no old school tie or anchor on your career if you have {say} a Lancashire {or other regional} accent, in fact if you have an accent it make you a bit of a celebrity over here, it can work for you rather than against you.

Don't sell your house in Canada, let it. I really believe you'll be back there as fast as you can!

Understood and appreciated... it really is down to an emotional {swimming back up stream} motivation, it makes little sense, but we'll spend a couple of months there and see how it looks...

Cornwall is beautiful, but it has a lot less than Canada going on that writeup.

Here's the thing about Canada, it's not the rivers or the lakes, or the mountains or the beauty of the coast line that makes it a great place to live, it's the people. I've been to a good few place around the world, spent a fair bit of time in the US, but nowhere have I lived or worked amongst people who are so easy to get along with, as mentioned no social stratification. If you move into a new area your neighbours may ask you where you work, in the UK that's often to figure out if they are earning more or less than you. In Canada they don't give a damn about that, their enquiry is more likely to see if they can give you a lift to work. If I had a quid for the number of times that {when I didn't used to drive} that my neighbours would drive past me in the pouring rain as I stood at the bus stop going to work at the same place as them, well, I wouldn't be playing 6/49 again. I'm not saying that all Canadians are "really nice people" or that everyone in the UK is a miserable begger, that's not how it is, but there seems to be a different social climate here, one that isn't abrasive or belligerent, so everyone benefits.

I've always been put off by the accents(their French is an offence to the ears, English is a bit better)

Gawd knows what the Quebecois made of my Lancashire accent, but after working with them {and enjoying it} there's a few of them now who say "Hey up", I told them that was the polite way to get by someone who's in yer way ;)

and the -30C winters bit.

It's not a problem really, until you turn 60 maybe, the roads are clear and the skiing is great, it's clearing the 150ft driveway when the snow is 4ft deep that starts to get at you...

I have family in Ontario but have never visited them, slightly to my shame.

You should get in touch with them, see what they think, maybe go stay with them for a while, see the place first hand...

Juvenal is right by the way, as you're presumably past surfing age,

At 63 the only surfing I do is on the www, mind you 20 years ago I did try it out at Laurencetown Beach, our local Mawgan Porth.

Dorset is well worth a look. Less rain and just as warm. I'd start with Swanage and Wareham, Swanage goes a bit rough for 6 weeks of the year, otherwise it's very nice and is next to some lovely coast.

I'll add them to the short list, thanks...

As he said, you can also get to London if your wife needs a bit more culture.

Yep, oft as not though it's a Mall she's looking for :rolleyes: but when we nip back to the UK we always take in a Show or two in London.

Signing off now getting ready for AC860 on Saturday, YHZ to LHR, with the winds we have here at the moment {spinning off from the hurricane down south} we might just set a record time crossing the pond.

All the Best, and THANKS to all of you that have given us pointers, valued and appreciated.

Bob.

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Well we made it, took 24 hours door to door, thankfully I managed to catch a few zzz's on the uneventful flight across the pond.

I picked up a car from Hertz @ Heathrow, plugged in my GPS and away we went. The roads were OK seeing as how it was Sunday, not much traffic but what they lacked in numbers they made up for in speed. I had to keep checking my speed thinking that I'd dropped below the posted limit, where it said 40 I did 40 {that doesn't win you any friends}, same in the 60 and 70 mph zones only to see folks rattle past at 90 mph or more, even where there were warning of speed camera's, I saw 3 get flashed in the 5 hours I took to get to Mawgan Porth ! Now I know why they call them "wing" mirrors, some folks are trying to fly. I'd forgotten that some folks over here consider driving to be a competitive and aggressive event, how they got round some of the bends at 20 mph over the speed limit I don't know, they must have tires laced with treacle...

Managed to get settle in, done a big shop and had time to check out Newquay, {I recall that one of you warned me of that}. Not sure if we are still jet lagged or whatever, but first impressions weren't the best, lots of houses looked neglected, some borderline derelict, hopefully as the days go on we might see things differently. Oddly enough there is a bit of a culture shock coming from Canada to the UK.

Bob.

Edited by Canada Bob
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Well we made it, took 24 hours door to door, thankfully I managed to catch a few zzz's on the uneventful flight across the pond.

I picked up a car from Hertz @ Heathrow, plugged in my GPS and away we went. The roads were OK seeing as how it was Sunday, not much traffic but what they lacked in numbers they made up for in speed. I had to keep checking my speed thinking that I'd dropped below the posted limit, where it said 40 I did 40 {that doesn't win you any friends}, same in the 60 and 70 mph zones only to see folks rattle past at 90 mph or more, even where there were warning of speed camera's, I saw 3 get flashed in the 5 hours I took to get to Mawgan Porth ! Now I know why they call them "wing" mirrors, some folks are trying to fly. I'd forgotten that some folks over here consider driving to be a competitive and aggressive event, how they got round some of the bends at 20 mph over the speed limit I don't know, they must have tires laced with treacle...

Managed to get settle in, done a big shop and had time to check out Newquay, {I recall that one of you warned me of that}. Not sure if we are still jet lagged or whatever, but first impressions weren't the best, lots of houses looked neglected, some borderline derelict, hopefully as the days go on we might see things differently. Oddly enough there is a bit of a culture shock coming from Canada to the UK.

Bob.

Every time I fly in to the UK it strikes me as being overpopulated, of course this isn't the case, it's just that the infrastructure is inadequate for the population.

Enjoy your time in the South-West, it's a lovely area (not the best time of year IMO, Sept-Oct or April-June would have been better).

Newquay? OK for surfers(who don't mind a fight with the locals for daring to surf on "their" patch) but otherwise steer well clear. Rough as guts. A favourite for chavs stag parties, I think that tells you all you need to know.

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Well we made it, took 24 hours door to door, thankfully I managed to catch a few zzz's on the uneventful flight across the pond.

I picked up a car from Hertz @ Heathrow, plugged in my GPS and away we went. The roads were OK seeing as how it was Sunday, not much traffic but what they lacked in numbers they made up for in speed. I had to keep checking my speed thinking that I'd dropped below the posted limit, where it said 40 I did 40 {that doesn't win you any friends}, same in the 60 and 70 mph zones only to see folks rattle past at 90 mph or more, even where there were warning of speed camera's, I saw 3 get flashed in the 5 hours I took to get to Mawgan Porth ! Now I know why they call them "wing" mirrors, some folks are trying to fly. I'd forgotten that some folks over here consider driving to be a competitive and aggressive event, how they got round some of the bends at 20 mph over the speed limit I don't know, they must have tires laced with treacle...

Managed to get settle in, done a big shop and had time to check out Newquay, {I recall that one of you warned me of that}. Not sure if we are still jet lagged or whatever, but first impressions weren't the best, lots of houses looked neglected, some borderline derelict, hopefully as the days go on we might see things differently. Oddly enough there is a bit of a culture shock coming from Canada to the UK.

Bob.

Head over to east Devon and West Dorset. I am Cornish and proud it; but Cornwall is very poor and the poverty is visible in the houses and the people. Drive up the coast for 2 hours, and there is far more money around and everything is far better kept.

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Well we made it, took 24 hours door to door, thankfully I managed to catch a few zzz's on the uneventful flight across the pond.

I picked up a car from Hertz @ Heathrow, plugged in my GPS and away we went. The roads were OK seeing as how it was Sunday, not much traffic but what they lacked in numbers they made up for in speed. I had to keep checking my speed thinking that I'd dropped below the posted limit, where it said 40 I did 40 {that doesn't win you any friends}, same in the 60 and 70 mph zones only to see folks rattle past at 90 mph or more, even where there were warning of speed camera's, I saw 3 get flashed in the 5 hours I took to get to Mawgan Porth ! Now I know why they call them "wing" mirrors, some folks are trying to fly. I'd forgotten that some folks over here consider driving to be a competitive and aggressive event, how they got round some of the bends at 20 mph over the speed limit I don't know, they must have tires laced with treacle...

Managed to get settle in, done a big shop and had time to check out Newquay, {I recall that one of you warned me of that}. Not sure if we are still jet lagged or whatever, but first impressions weren't the best, lots of houses looked neglected, some borderline derelict, hopefully as the days go on we might see things differently. Oddly enough there is a bit of a culture shock coming from Canada to the UK.

Bob.

Enjoy your holiday and keep posting what you think of where you visit.

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As an example, we live on Glen Arbour {see the link below} an estate built around a really nice Golf Club where every person who lives on the estate {around 400 of us} gets a free life time membership, you just pay the green fees.

Erm....

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Head over to east Devon and West Dorset. I am Cornish and proud it; but Cornwall is very poor and the poverty is visible in the houses and the people. Drive up the coast for 2 hours, and there is far more money around and everything is far better kept.

Ugh. That's southeast England, economically and socially, meaning you overpay silly prices to live somewhere pretty mediocre (or even sillier prices to live anywhere remotely desirable). And there's a lot that's mediocre: bland towns, bland landscape, little bits of attractive coastline you have to fight the hoards to get to, nearest decent city life Bath/Bristol.

Even the trains know it's the southeast ... a southeast railcard goes as far as Exeter.

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If you are thinking of looking farther afield - then somewhere in the East Neuk of Fife could be a goer. Pittenweem, Crail, Elie - that sort of place. Or East Lothian perhaps - Gullane. North Berwick, Dunbar. All less than an hour from Edinburgh which has a lot more to offer than the likes of Plymouth or Exeter. As far as trains go probably wouldn't take any longer to get to London from here than it would from the South West. Same with flying. Is there a specific reason for restricting yourselves to the 3 areas listed in your OP ? Just being nosey !!

North Berwick:

http://www.espc.com/buying/290914.html

North Berwick:

North+Berwick+from+the+Glen.jpg

Pittenweem

pittenweem.jpg

Edited by ccc
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If you are thinking of looking farther afield - then somewhere in the East Neuk of Fife could be a goer. Pittenweem, Crail, Elie - that sort of place. Or East Lothian perhaps - Gullane. North Berwick, Dunbar. All less than an hour from Edinburgh which has a lot more to offer than the likes of Plymouth or Exeter. As far as trains go probably wouldn't take any longer to get to London from here than it would from the South West. Same with flying. Is there a specific reason for restricting yourselves to the 3 areas listed in your OP ? Just being nosey !!

North Berwick:

http://www.espc.com/buying/290914.html

North Berwick:

North+Berwick+from+the+Glen.jpg

Pittenweem

pittenweem.jpg

Those are lovely places but maybe he wants to live somewhere where the temperature occasionally rises above 20C and the sun's rays reach the earth!

I've been sun/wind-burned after a clifftop walk on an exceptional day in Cornwall in January, in Scotland you'd be lucky to get off-white in June.

That said, as you say Edinburgh is in another league to anything offered in SW England.

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Those are lovely places but maybe he wants to live somewhere where the temperature occasionally rises above 20C and the sun's rays reach the earth!

I've been sun/wind-burned after a clifftop walk on an exceptional day in Cornwall in January, in Scotland you'd be lucky to get off-white in June.

That said, as you say Edinburgh is in another league to anything offered in SW England.

Yep definitely warmer in the south west than these places. However as for sun you are probably better off up here. Get a lot of sun up around these parts. Not sure if it is more than the South West but I would not be surprised. Rarely as warn though !!

And coming from Canada, being an hour away from proper mountains and snow in the winter up here, may be a bonus as well ?

Cornwall is a lovely place. However given the Canada Bob's original post and what they are looking for ? I think somewhere nearer Edinburgh perhaps fits the bill a bit better.

Value for money for houses is probably not much better though.

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I was just reading something about Canada and it reminded me of this thread.

Posted 10 November 2010 - 07:10 PM

Well we made it, took 24 hours door to door

Canada Bob Last Active: Nov 12 2010 11:17 PM

I wonder what happened to him? He wasn't impressed but his mother had told him if you cannot say anything nice don't say anything at all?

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