Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Canada Bob

Canada To Cornwall, Maybe...

Recommended Posts

Hi,

After 30 years in Canada I have taken early retirement and we {me and the Mrs} are considering heading back to the UK, probably somewhere in the SW of England.

We have lived in Nova Scotia for the last 20 years or so where the 4,600 miles of coastline has a lot in common with Cornwall, Devon and to a lesser extent with Dorset and Somerset, so these counties {listed in order of preference} are the focus of our search. You can read a lot on the www about an area but there's nothing like having input from the locals, so I hope you don't mind me dropping in to ask for some direction.

As mentioned we are now both retired so we don't need to relocate to a town or village where jobs are available, maybe that helps get a better deal on house prices ? Ideally we would like to have a detached home on or near to the ocean, or a river, I like to go fishing, other than that there's nothing like watching the sea on a stormy day.

We don't need a huge house, there's just the two of us, so we don't need a 4 bedroom house, our budget is up to £350,000 so the downturn in house prices in the UK should help us get a decent place, but where's the best places to be looking, is there anywhere we should avoid like the plague ? As for type of home, we aren't fussy on that, traditional stone or new build works for us, if there's one thing it's having larger rooms rather than more of them that appeals.

There's a few places we visited many years ago that we liked, the north coast of Cornwall has a lot going for it, but Exeter is also an impressive place. I could live in a small village, long as there's a pub that is ;) but women like to shop so a bigger town or city like Exeter would be more to the wife's liking. She has drawn up a shortlist of places that fall into the Exeter, Teignmouth, Sidmouth triangle, looking for access to local transportation {she doesn't drive}, and for a main line rail links.

So with me focusing on the North Coast and her looking at Exeter could we be further apart :rolleyes:

One thing that's as important to us as anything mentioned above is to be in a low crime rate area, the last thing you want when you retire is to find yourself living in a problem area, hence the need for local knowledge.

Some of the places we have appeared on our lists to date include, St Ives/Hayle, Perranporth, Newquay and Bude, well that's my shortlist :) Then there's Brixham to Grand Ruan, so few places are left out, maybe some of them should be ? Any thoughts about Plymouth ?

We would really appreciate your comments and direction based on the above, especially where our money might get the best deal in a decent location.

Thanks,

Bob.

Edited by Canada Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi from Cornwall,

I live in Truro and currently looking to buy (hope to hear today) a place near St Agnes. I have to be within striking distance of Truro for schools (which is obviously not a concern of yours) so that very much limited my choice. Truro is a fantastic city incidentally - brilliant farmer's market, lovely Cathedral, lots of artistic and cultural events.

The really popular areas with the well-healed are the East and West flanks of Truro - the Roselands Peninsula and the area to the West including Mylor Bridge, Devoran, Flushing, Restronguet Point (the district of Feock essentially). I consider these areas to be a little like living graveyards (pristine, stuffy) and I personally prefer the wildness and beauty of the North Coast despite all its dated, tatty seaside towns. (I put Perranporth in this category, I personally think that the coastline has been ruined by some horrible developments but the beach and the costal walks here are fantastic and many people still want to live there).

Newquay is locally regarded as 'the pits' and prices are falling fast here despite the international surfing competitions at Fistral. You may find a quaint farmhouse on the outskirts but the town centre is regarded as a 'no go' area.

St Ives made popular and famous by Barbara Hepworth and rated to have one of the highest rates of STD in the country because of the bohemian element. The St Ives coastline has to be one of the most beautiful in the country - the sand that glows and lights the sea. The town itself is idyllic but absolutely packed with visitors most of the year round. At the peak of the market a two bed, in the centre of the town and on the shoreline was up for sale for around £1m The beaches around St Ives are great though and it is, despite the crowds, a really good day out. Hayle is essentially sub-urban sprawl spreading out from St Ives. The town centre is basically quite attractive and has some unusual features but I have only been there once and I'm not much of an authority.

I would be happy to give some views on any properties that take your interest - you will find that the choice is much more limited than Devon. Living here you do sense the smallness of your area - it is a bit like living on a small island. Just 10 minutes from north to south coast.

You might like to look at St Agnes - within striking distance of Newquay and Truro- respectable area and sought after but not too stuffy and self-important.

Good luck with it all!

Edited by Reluctant Heretic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd do more than think long and hard on coming to the U.K. after living in Canada for 20 years. In my opinion your quality of life far surpasses the quality of life you will find in the U.K. As a Canadian living in the U.K., I'd honestly recommend that you live in the U.K. for one year complete before you up sticks and move over here. I think you may be disappointed

Edited by Muskoka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello RL...

THANKS for your comments, exactly what I need to know, I'll scrub Newquay and look more closely at St Ives, Truro and the other smaller places you've mentioned. Truro seems to fit the bill for both of us, we like the old places that still have some charm helps if they have a Cathedral too, and a farmers market is a plus too.

The thing is, it's one thing to visit a place for a week or so on holiday and enjoy the place, but it's a completely different experience living there full time, I've learned that over the years.

We'll be scouring the places you mentioned to see what's for sale and doing a few drive bys on Google Earth thing.

Thanks for taking the time, appreciated.

Bob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd do more than think long and hard on coming to the U.K. after living in Canada for 20 years. In my opinion your quality of life far surpasses the quality of life you will find in the U.K. As a Canadian living in the U.K., I'd honestly recommend that you live in the U.K. for one year complete before you up sticks and move over here. I think you may be disappointed

Muskoka hey, you're a long way from home !!!

In the near 30 years that we've been in Canada we've lived 6 years in Thorold {think St Catharines}, then 2 years in Sorel/Tracy {20 miles downstream from Montreal}, then 1 year in Charlottetown followed by 20 years in HRM {Halifax Regional Municipality}. Like them all, and although your region and Algonquin Park has a lot going for it, as does the rest of Canada I think it's time for us to swim back upstream, can't make a sensible argument for it, just one of those things.

I know what you mean about giving it some thought before burning any bridges, in fact we have a 2 month visit coming up as of next week end, this time next week we'll be based in Mawgan Porth, hence the request in here for some comments and local knowledge.

As you say life over here can spoil you, in more ways than one, there's little if any belligerence/friction or stratification of society here, folks don't take pleasure in winding each other up. Regarding the standard of living, well, the divide was even wider 30 years ago when we left the UK, it's less so these days, but still there.

On the up side, houses aren't selling like they used to here in Canada, sales this year in Nova Scotia are around 20% down, but prices haven't slipped, so if you can sell then you won't lose any money. There's one big advantage though of moving to the UK at this point in time as the Canadian $ is stronger now than it's ever been against the £. It used to cost around $2.35 to buy £1 less than 2 years ago, now the cost to buy a £ is around $1.50 the £ has lost in the region of 35% !!! add that to the price drops on homes in the UK and then factor in that we both have taken early retirement {63/62} paid in Cnd $'s and you can start to see some of

the attractions of heading back to the UK, but it isn't just the financial side of it, it's maybe that we're getting that urge to swim back up the stream that spawned up 60 odd years ago.

Have to say that it was a surprise to hear from you, few Canadians emigrate, must tell you something about the country, the Yanks {like many other folks} will insist that "America" is the best place to live, yet they leave by the tens of thousands to live in Canada.

According to Stats Can when we arrived near 30 years ago, we were amongst some 82,000 Brits to arrive here that year, yet only 37 Canadians left Canada to live in the UK, my guess is they were all from Penetanguishene ;)

Things haven't changed much since then, Canada still invites 250,000 immigrants per year as it has done for almost 40 years, yet we still have only 6 people per square mile, it's 635 per square mile in the UK so I'm told, density of population does seem to affect the attitude of folks, the more intense, the more intense they are...

Are you in the SW ? do you intend to stay ? have you lost the "up talk" yet ;)

Thanks for the calibration, appreciated...

Bob.

Edited by Canada Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't argue with most of what Reluctant Heretic says. I prefer the S Coast but that's just me.

One thing I've noticed being down here - the difference between a good area and a bad area can be just a couple of miles. There are some chav infested ratholes quite close to nice areas. Another thing to watch for is "rat runs" (traffic shortcuts). There are several rush hours in Cornwall:- school run; people leaving work; people going to the beach etc. Some roads might seem idyllic at some times of days but turn into high speed traffic runs at others. Caveat emptor! Always go back and look at school run time, and ideally on a nice-ish day when there's beach traffic too. And/or in the school holidays.

Similarly check how you are going to get to where you want to go. Some friends lived in/near a very picturesque N Coast village. If they wanted to go shopping in the school holidays they had to be up at the crack of dawn to get out and back in before the traffic. They hated it and moved in the end. Remember English holidays are quite long (6+ weeks in the summer, 2 weeks at Easter, and 2 x half terms each 1 week). Choose the wrong place and you'll be in a living hell for those weeks.

I'd suggest renting to start with, find your way around, find where you like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand where your coming from on the better dollar rate, and I wish you the best of luck, but if it was me, I'd still be covering my bases..............You can contact currency exchange companys and negotiage a preferential exchange rate which you can lock into for a certain period of time. (I dont know the details of this, but just looking at options for you)

Ya, I'm a long way from home. I miss it a lot.....but I get over there lots ....on a very regular basis... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't argue with most of what Reluctant Heretic says. I prefer the S Coast but that's just me.

One thing I've noticed being down here - the difference between a good area and a bad area can be just a couple of miles. There are some chav infested ratholes quite close to nice areas. Another thing to watch for is "rat runs" (traffic shortcuts). There are several rush hours in Cornwall:- school run; people leaving work; people going to the beach etc. Some roads might seem idyllic at some times of days but turn into high speed traffic runs at others. Caveat emptor! Always go back and look at school run time, and ideally on a nice-ish day when there's beach traffic too. And/or in the school holidays.

Similarly check how you are going to get to where you want to go. Some friends lived in/near a very picturesque N Coast village. If they wanted to go shopping in the school holidays they had to be up at the crack of dawn to get out and back in before the traffic. They hated it and moved in the end. Remember English holidays are quite long (6+ weeks in the summer, 2 weeks at Easter, and 2 x half terms each 1 week). Choose the wrong place and you'll be in a living hell for those weeks.

I'd suggest renting to start with, find your way around, find where you like.

Thanks for the above re the traffic and the chavs, with a bit of luck we'll be able to avoid both of them, for the most part. Odd how the words are the same, but when the local radio stations here are reporting a traffic jam on one of the harbour bridges or Barrington Street, but the fact of it is, I've seen more cars at ASDA !

It helps being retired, we aren't obliged to rush anywhere and when the crowds turn up in summer time chances are we would be somewhere else, adding to some other poor beggars dementia as they try to get to work :rolleyes:

Right now it's between Truro & Exeter, with a couple of other smaller places still in the running.

Bob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand where your coming from on the better dollar rate, and I wish you the best of luck, but if it was me, I'd still be covering my bases..............You can contact currency exchange companys and negotiage a preferential exchange rate which you can lock into for a certain period of time. (I dont know the details of this, but just looking at options for you)

Ya, I'm a long way from home. I miss it a lot.....but I get over there lots ....on a very regular basis... :rolleyes:

I hear you, if it didn't work out we could always head back to Canada, we've been Canadian Citizens for over 25 years, so no problem on that front. As for currency deals we have worked with XE.com beats the hell out of the rates the banks offer. How long have you been in the UK ? are you in the SW ?

Bob.

PS... we will be arriving this Sunday, staying for a couple of months to check the area out, staying initially in Porth Mawgan.

Edited by Canada Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi.

We are also in Canada, and we are also intending to retire to the West Country. There the similarities end. We are in Edmonton where we moved from the UK in 06. My husband is a Canadian, who spent 25 years in the UK, but I'm English. We are not intending to move for a couple of years yet, but in the meantime I'm keeping an eye on the market.

What I've observed about the areas in the West Country that I'm looking at is that the prices are fairly static, but property is not selling. A lot of asking prices are much too high. I recommend using the website Rightmove, not just for listings, but also for price comparison reports. They show the last properties to be registered at the Land Registry. In the two towns in Dorset I'm keeping tabs on, no houses have sold at all for over 2 years, which makes the asking prices little more than whistling in the wind.

There are a lot of homes in the West Country owned as holiday lets or second homes. Second home owners can sometimes wait for prices to improve, but if nothing is selling at all, sooner or later prices are going to crash.

If I were you, I'd certainly rent for a year. You have been in Canada a long time and things do change. You might not like Blighty as much as you think. But also prices have nowhere to go but down over the course of the next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You want the north coast, your wife wants a bigger place. Barnstaple/Bideford could be worth a look, with middling-size-town facilities locally, good coastline nearby, and a trainline to Exeter.

Nearly headed for there when I returned to Blighty from abroad some years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Editha,

Edmonton hey, I guess you'd notice a difference between winter where you are and the temps in Cornwall or Devon, come to think of it Inverness would look sub tropical :rolleyes:

Thanks for the tip re Rightmove, I've just been to check it out, seems to be a good place to check out what's on the market and if the asking is legit. The West Country has a lot to offer, although we have focused on Cornwall & Devon I can't say that Somerset or Dorset are out of the running.

I guess you have noticed how the Cnd $ had gone up sharply against the GBP, around 35% in the last couple of years, not sure if that's the $ going up, or the GBP going down, but we are also 10% to 15% up against the greenback, I haven't seen the Cnd $ fly as high as this in the near 30 years since we've been here. My guess is it's the vale of the North Pole and all the Methane Hydrate that the Russians and the Yanks are trying to grab off us, when this stuff comes on line Canada may well become one of the wealthiest countries in the world, I doubt it will be in my time though, so I won't be holding my breath...

As for the changes there's been in the UK since we left, fair point, I see there's 700 people a day leaving the country, has to be a reason for that, but, the motives we have aren't exactly rational or logical, more like salmon when they {for some reason} decide to head back from whence they came. Seems there's only two types of decisions that we make in life, the rational/logical decisions, and the emotional decisions, experience has taught me that 80% of the time the logical decisions turn out to be the right ones, yet when we make a decision based on emotion we often live to regret them.

If things didn't pan out "back home" then we would always have the option to return to Canada, no problem there as we've been Citizens for around 25 years, so we won't be burning any bridges. Mind you, I'd probably sell the snow blower, and be glad to see the last of it, it's bad enough here in Nova Scotia in winter time, Ontario was worse, we could get 6ft of snow in 6 hours, snowflakes as big as arf crowns, that would be one thing I wouldn't miss...

Bob.

Edited by Canada Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You want the north coast, your wife wants a bigger place. Barnstaple/Bideford could be worth a look, with middling-size-town facilities locally, good coastline nearby, and a trainline to Exeter.

Nearly headed for there when I returned to Blighty from abroad some years ago.

Thanks for the above PM, appreciated, I'll run me ruler over the pair of them :)

Bob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello RL...

THANKS for your comments, exactly what I need to know, I'll scrub Newquay and look more closely at St Ives, Truro and the other smaller places you've mentioned. Truro seems to fit the bill for both of us, we like the old places that still have some charm helps if they have a Cathedral too, and a farmers market is a plus too.

The thing is, it's one thing to visit a place for a week or so on holiday and enjoy the place, but it's a completely different experience living there full time, I've learned that over the years.

We'll be scouring the places you mentioned to see what's for sale and doing a few drive bys on Google Earth thing.

Thanks for taking the time, appreciated.

Bob.

Pleasure Canada Bob .

Incidentally - there is a farmhouse near St Ives in the latest auction at around the £300k mark. I've attached the link because it is always interesting (I think) looking at auctions anyway.

http://www.fulfords.co.uk/content/009_Results/002_Property/property-sales-rpsFUL-AUC100458-1288170146

Take off that hideous plastic contraption at the front and you have the beginnings of a true rural idyll.

RH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know what you mean about giving it some thought before burning any bridges, in fact we have a 2 month visit coming up as of next week end, this time next week we'll be based in Mawgan Porth, hence the request in here for some comments and local knowledge.

Let us know your thoughts and whether after your visit you will start considering another country or be staying in Canada.

If the visit doesn't put you off, if I were you I would let the house in Canada and rent over here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pleasure Canada Bob .

Incidentally - there is a farmhouse near St Ives in the latest auction at around the £300k mark. I've attached the link because it is always interesting (I think) looking at auctions anyway.

http://www.fulfords.co.uk/content/009_Results/002_Property/property-sales-rpsFUL-AUC100458-1288170146

Take off that hideous plastic contraption at the front and you have the beginnings of a true rural idyll.

RH

Hmmm, I see what you mean, the thing is, after reading in here and elsewhere about what goes on at auctions it's put me off to say the least. Add to that we are really looking for something in walk in condition, too old these days to be up and down ladders all day, building a dream home for the next buyers benefit :(

Getting excited now, we'll be there in just 4 days time...

Bob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let us know your thoughts and whether after your visit you will start considering another country or be staying in Canada.

If the visit doesn't put you off, if I were you I would let the house in Canada and rent over here.

Willdo {re what we think of it all}, as for the house here, well, we won't be selling it until we're sure about moving back to the UK.

Have to ask [seeing as there's been a few concerns brought up}, I'm guessing that the concerns are about the UK in general rather than the SW ? and that the concerns are down to anti social behavior ?

Bob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Willdo {re what we think of it all}, as for the house here, well, we won't be selling it until we're sure about moving back to the UK.

Have to ask [seeing as there's been a few concerns brought up}, I'm guessing that the concerns are about the UK in general rather than the SW ? and that the concerns are down to anti social behavior ?

Bob.

I have never lived in Cornwall just been there on holidays.

I'm just surprised that anyone living in a resource rich and financially better off country like Canada would move to the debt ridden UK. The standard of living here is declining by the day. Diesel is £5.53 a gallon near me and that's before VAT rises from 17.5% to 20% on Jan 4th. The UK is over-populated and run by politicians out to feather their own nest. Inequality is growing by the day. I think of it as the United Greedom.

If you were younger and planning to come here to work I would tell you to run a mile. However at your ages with a pension paid in Canadian Dollars you might be better placed than a lot of people. I hope it works out for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never lived in Cornwall just been there on holidays.

Understood...

I'm just surprised that anyone living in a resource rich and financially better off country like Canada would move to the debt ridden UK.

As above, I hear where you are coming from. Canada is a good country where a working/blue collar bloke can expect to have a standard of living equal to that of a Dr or Lawyer, or the like in the UK. One thing you can say about Canada is "you don't need to be a Millionaire to live like one over here". The cost of living is relatively low yet the standard of living is very high.

As for the National Debt, well a mate of mine who went to LSE told me that {almost a year ago} that the debt was 800 Billion quid :o

I believe it's a lot more than that now, anyway it's an amount that folks can't get their heads around, how much is 800 Billion !

He put it this way to me, if bricks cost £1 each then it would be enough to build The Great Wall of China, 200 times over :unsure:

I thought he was just attempting to describe the debt in a graphic way, but the truth of it is, according to wiki et-al they estimate that The Great Wall has approx 4 Billion bricks in it, maybe it was someone else from the LSE that counted them ;) but the beggar of it is, that's the scale of the debt ! a wall of bricks that would circle the equator 40 times over !!!

No doubt if we do come back we will have to make some contribution to paying it down, but most of our income now is tax free, the debt will outlive most of us I guess, it's a grim situation though. But as they say every cloud has a sliver lining, the quantitative easing has caused the £ to drop quite a bit, so in effect that's to our Canadian $ benefit.

The standard of living here is declining by the day. Diesel is £5.53 a gallon near me

Blimey ! that's extortionate !!! gas/petrol/diesel is 13/- {OK 65p} a liter here. I can't figure out why petrol is so expensive in the UK, folks back home are quick to tell me that "it's 80% tax over here" but the % of tax is the same here in Canada, we pay 80% tax on fuel too, but I guess if the starting price is 40p or more {per liter} in the UK and only 20p or less per liter in Canada then you finish up paying twice the price...

and that's before VAT rises from 17.5% to 20% on Jan 4th.

20% !!! are you sure about that ? damn that sounds more like Confiscation of your money rather than Taxation :(

The UK is over-populated and run by politicians out to feather their own nest.

Can't say that over here, we have just 6 people per square mile, and that seems to affect the way that folks think and behave. It's not worth mentioning if your home is on 2-3 acres of land, there's no shortage of it here, and no bragging rights attached to it.

As for politicians are the same everywhere, just varying degrees of skulduggery, mind you, that last episode with the MP's expenses took the cake hey, when you think that young men {and women} are shedding their blood and too many losing their lives serving their country, while people holding Office of public trust are raiding the till it's sickening.

Inequality is growing by the day. I think of it as the United Greedom.

I guess some areas are worse {maybe much worse} than others, is there anywhere you'd say was the best place to be in the UK ?

If you were younger and planning to come here to work I would tell you to run a mile.

Certainly agree with you on that...

However at your ages with a pension paid in Canadian Dollars you might be better placed than a lot of people.

I hope it works out for you.

I'm beginning to have second thoughts, and we haven't even arrived yet ;)

All the Best,

Bob.

Edited by Canada Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You say early retirement so I presume that you will be fit and healthy for some years to come. However, in case you might not be, or you are hoping this is your last move, Id say one thing that is vital to think about is access to shops and services. That small village you like with one pub and a corner shop - will it provide all that you need if you are having trouble getting about? In ten years those facilities may not be there at all. If you need home help, it may be very expensive to get someone into a more isolated place.

Being walking distance from the facilities of a small, manageable town like Truro sounds sensible. Also somewhere where there is likely to be availablity of home help/care if you might need it. Careful with Exeter, there are some quite ropey suburbs.

Wherever you go, rent before you buy so you can be sure it is the right place for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and that's before VAT rises from 17.5% to 20% on Jan 4th.

20% !!! are you sure about that ? damn that sounds more like Confiscation of your money rather than Taxation :(

I'm very sure: http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/vat/forms-rates/rates/rate-increase.htm

By the way the diesel price near me is a lot cheaper than more rural places not that far away. You can check fuel prices here:

http://www.petrolprices.com/

Some other sites that might be of interest to you particularly if you look to buy

Sold house prices http://www.nethouseprices.com/index.php?con=Search-Sold-House-Prices

Broadband http://www.samknows.com/broadband/broadband_checker

Flooding http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/floods/31650.aspx

Those sites require postcodes which you can find from here:

http://postcode.royalmail.com/portal/rm/postcodefinder?catId=400145

You mentioned Google so I assume you know about their streetview? Another site with pictures of places is

http://www.geograph.org.uk/search.php

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never lived in Cornwall just been there on holidays.

I'm just surprised that anyone living in a resource rich and financially better off country like Canada would move to the debt ridden UK. The standard of living here is declining by the day. Diesel is £5.53 a gallon near me and that's before VAT rises from 17.5% to 20% on Jan 4th. The UK is over-populated and run by politicians out to feather their own nest. Inequality is growing by the day. I think of it as the United Greedom.

If you were younger and planning to come here to work I would tell you to run a mile. However at your ages with a pension paid in Canadian Dollars you might be better placed than a lot of people. I hope it works out for you.

Yes I'm struggling to make sense of this idea, but as I don't know what the area of Canada he is leaving is like, maybe it does make some sense. Perhaps it's dull and cold like the worse towns of South Island NZ.

I presume Canada Bob is leaving friends behind in Canada as well. Retiring to somewhere where they don't know anyone and the locals are notoriously clannish, hmmmm. I would definitely steer well clear of all the small Cornish villages/towns and stick to Truro or Exeter, especially as his wife doesn't drive.

These are the only reasons I can think of for moving to Cornwall :-

1. It's physically lovely, no doubt about that, and I like the temperate climate, though perhaps a little less rain would be nice.

2. One thing we have that doesn't exist so much in other countries(no idea about Canada) is the wonderful network of paths and trails and rights of way. Great for walkers and mountain bikers. In the Cornish climate a hardy retired person can go for a walk 365 days a year.

3. Some sort of attachment to the land of ones birth, that special smell of coastal Cornwall makes you feel like you're on holiday all the time if you went there as a kid.

4. At retirement age he won't be surfing, so that's about it!

Canada must be really really dull is all I can guess!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You say early retirement so I presume that you will be fit and healthy for some years to come. However, in case you might not be, or you are hoping this is your last move, Id say one thing that is vital to think about is access to shops and services. That small village you like with one pub and a corner shop - will it provide all that you need if you are having trouble getting about? In ten years those facilities may not be there at all. If you need home help, it may be very expensive to get someone into a more isolated place.

Being walking distance from the facilities of a small, manageable town like Truro sounds sensible. Also somewhere where there is likely to be availablity of home help/care if you might need it. Careful with Exeter, there are some quite ropey suburbs.

Wherever you go, rent before you buy so you can be sure it is the right place for you.

Took early retirement this year {age 62 then}, not as fit as I used to be, but I still run 5k most days, used to run cross country years ago but quit that when I turned 50, I can still run but it don't look as "graceful" these days ;) Other than that although fishing and sailing is my main event these days we do a fair bit of hiking, I might be out of warranty , and maybe you can't get the parts anymore, but I'm hoping there's a bit left in the engine yet.

I'd like the small village thing, but the wife wants a place with a bus route {to the shops, sigh}, so a bigger place like Truro or maybe Exeter might be the best place to be.

As for renting before we go in at the deep end, well a buddy of mine has a place in Mawgan Porth that we'll be renting off him, so that will be our base for the next couple of months, should be central enough for us to have a look around.

One thing I'm finding right now though is, some of the houses that we have seen on Rightmove look quite nice, but then when you take a closer look on Google Earth {street level} some of the immediate surroundings look hellish, or as they say over here, they lack kerb appeal, no wonder some of them are still on the market, some show the "For Sale" sign on Google Earth back in 2008/2009 and are still on the market.

It's a good feature the GE thing, saves you driving miles to find that the house is fine but the "approached experience" leaves something to be desired...

Thanks for your feedback, appreciated...

Bob.

Edited by Canada Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm very sure: http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/vat/forms-rates/rates/rate-increase.htm

By the way the diesel price near me is a lot cheaper than more rural places not that far away. You can check fuel prices here:

http://www.petrolprices.com/

Some other sites that might be of interest to you particularly if you look to buy

Sold house prices http://www.nethouseprices.com/index.php?con=Search-Sold-House-Prices

Broadband http://www.samknows.com/broadband/broadband_checker

Flooding http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/floods/31650.aspx

Those sites require postcodes which you can find from here:

http://postcode.royalmail.com/portal/rm/postcodefinder?catId=400145

You mentioned Google so I assume you know about their streetview? Another site with pictures of places is

http://www.geograph.org.uk/search.php

Good luck.

Thanks for the links, some good/interesting stuff there including the flood plain thing, you tend to forget about that problem when you've been away from home as long as we have.

Bob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, I see what you mean, the thing is, after reading in here and elsewhere about what goes on at auctions it's put me off to say the least. Add to that we are really looking for something in walk in condition, too old these days to be up and down ladders all day, building a dream home for the next buyers benefit :(

Getting excited now, we'll be there in just 4 days time...

Bob.

You missed the really important point - it has just about enough land for self-sufficiency. You will need to build high security fencing with look out posts etc. but the local population is small enough that you could fight them off with just a couple of machine guns (assuming the Mrs is available). Good climate for soft fruits - keep the scurvy at bay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.