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Ruffneck

Parking For Parents With Prams

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Take a large batch of prime shopping carpark real estate up and half the time they're all empty anyway.

I can understand with disabled bays but prams?

Most of them have plenty of time to go shopping during the week (when the carparks are mostly empty) whilst other folks are at work anyway.

From what i understand it's a relatively new thing , how on earth did these people cope with it when there wasn't these sort of things?

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These spaces are great because the extra width allows you to open the doors fully to strap in a child and gives you space to set up your pushchair without having to stand in the middle of the road. Safer all round.

Cars have ballooned in size but car park spaces have not.

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They are always full in my local supermarket. It's not the proximity to the store that's useful is the extra bit of room to the side for getting the little ones out of baby seats that is handy. Of course people do cope without them.

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They are always full in my local supermarket. It's not the proximity to the store that's useful is the extra bit of room to the side for getting the little ones out of baby seats that is handy. Of course people do cope without them.

People didn't used to have all the baby paraphernalia either.  I am sure when baby ML was bought back from the hospital it was in muns arms in the front seat of a Hillman Avenger.  Now you have to have bullet proof baby seats and 4x4 stollers.

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People didn't used to have all the baby paraphernalia either. I am sure when baby ML was bought back from the hospital it was in muns arms in the front seat of a Hillman Avenger. Now you have to have bullet proof baby seats and 4x4 stollers.

the bigger the designer name the better too.

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As a disabled person with a blue badge, I can understand the need for parents with prams to have wider spaces to park in. I just can't understand why they have to put them just in front of the stores. After all, most parents of toddlers are young and fit. I wonder just how eager they'd be, though, to walk from the far end of the car park? I often am tempted to park in these spots if there are no disabled bays available, specially when I'm with my 36 year old son!:P

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I had a few well-chosen words with the M&S (Marks and Spencer) staff on the outskirts of Swansea a few years ago after they put A4 paper print-out signs up on the windows and doors asking pensioners/disabled to go and park at the car-park to the side/rear of the store so that parents with kids could park directly in front of the store.

Having, at the time, a bad bout of stress-induced asthma and also having looked after my elerly Mum, who was finding it increasingly difficult to walk, I pointed out that for a healthy person the extra 30 yards would not be a problem but for the eldery and disbled it would be like climbing Everest. It was like talking to wood IMPO.

No wonder this country has shopping centres full of clinically obese Mums sticking clinically obese children, IMPO, from car seat into pushchairs mere yards from the doors to supermarkets. I told them that many Mums and kids could benefit from walking - lazy selfish lot IMPO.

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Agree with points made by others re extra space at side of bay being issue rather than proximity to the store.

BTW in my local sainsburys, the parent+child bays are often full, however I have never seen anything close to full occupancy of the numerous disabled spaces.

Most car parks now have bays too small for modern cars (not even talking about these ridiculous 4x4s)

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If the sign says 'Parents with children' and anyone confronts you just say 'they're at home'.

There's far too many of both these and the disabled spaces - there's some rule of thumb in % of disabled spaces actually set down.

What you end up with is something that looks like you're visiting the national centre for wheelchair basketball.

The technology must be there, and affordable, to have illuminated signs at different times of the day to ensure able-bodied childless people aren't having to walk miles.

Of course, they're not because supermarkets give a f**k about how far mothers have to walk with children but rather they know families spend more and they don't want the thought of having to walk miles to the car discourage them from doing so.

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I saw this on the front page and had to reply .. if only because it involves that lovely HPC proof place we all know and love .. MAIDSTONE ..

I have five children and a 4x4 .. Quick pause for the wave of hate to calm down ..

In 2006 I was in Maidstone visiting my parents and I had to get something from the supermarket .. So I put my daughter in the centre seat at the front of the Landrover. Seeing the "Mother and baby spaces" at the front of the supermarket I thought "How jolly convienient .." and parked .. before I had even turned off the engine this lady was banging on the window ..

"These spaces are for MOTHERS with children .. "

I just could not be arsed to argue so I just went and parked in the normal parking spaces ..

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As a disabled person with a blue badge, I can understand the need for parents with prams to have wider spaces to park in. I just can't understand why they have to put them just in front of the stores. After all, most parents of toddlers are young and fit. I wonder just how eager they'd be, though, to walk from the far end of the car park? I often am tempted to park in these spots if there are no disabled bays available, specially when I'm with my 36 year old son!:P

these spaces are really so that yummy mummies can get a real swing on the door and put a decent dent in your car.

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these spaces are really so that yummy mummies can get a real swing on the door and put a decent dent in your car.

I'd simply drive over them in my outrageous, lifted 4 x 4!:ph34r:

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As a disabled person with a blue badge, I can understand the need for parents with prams to have wider spaces to park in. I just can't understand why they have to put them just in front of the stores. After all, most parents of toddlers are young and fit. I wonder just how eager they'd be, though, to walk from the far end of the car park? I often am tempted to park in these spots if there are no disabled bays available, specially when I'm with my 36 year old son!:P

But does not the same apply to disabled people? As long as they have space to get in and out of their vehicle, why the need to be outside the entrance when they are able to travel from their home to the shop, shop in the shop and then get home with their shopping?

If a person is so disabled that an extra 30m makes a difference, why are they shopping in the first place?

It really annoys me that so many empty spaces are created by allocated disabled parking, and those that are occupied are not disabled anyway!

I know of a so called disabled person who has just had an allocated parking space outside the front of their home - she lives in a flat on the 1st floor with no lift! Where's the effing logic in that?

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As a disabled person with a blue badge, I can understand the need for parents with prams to have wider spaces to park in. I just can't understand why they have to put them just in front of the stores. After all, most parents of toddlers are young and fit. I wonder just how eager they'd be, though, to walk from the far end of the car park? I often am tempted to park in these spots if there are no disabled bays available, specially when I'm with my 36 year old son!:P

But does not the same apply to disabled people? As long as they have space to get in and out of their vehicle, why the need to be outside the entrance when they are able to travel from their home to the shop, shop in the shop and then get home with their shopping?

If a person is so disabled that an extra 30m makes a difference, why are they shopping in the first place?

It really annoys me that so many empty spaces are created by allocated disabled parking, and those that are occupied are not disabled anyway!

I know of a so called disabled person who has just had an allocated parking space outside the front of their home - she lives in a flat on the 1st floor with no lift! Where's the effing logic in that?

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These are a good thing, namely as it concentrates the funts in one area.

My old Mazda used to take a battering, people would open the doors wide as possible dinging the door, this woman this this while I was IN the car. Harsh words were exchanged but it didn't hurt too much as my Mazda was junk anyway. For newer cars and especially bikes I park them far away because people simply don't consider their actions anymore.

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Take a large batch of prime shopping carpark real estate up and half the time they're all empty anyway.

I can understand with disabled bays but prams?

Most of them have plenty of time to go shopping during the week (when the carparks are mostly empty) whilst other folks are at work anyway.

From what i understand it's a relatively new thing , how on earth did these people cope with it when there wasn't these sort of things?

Where I am, the parent and child bays are pretty much full all of the time - with parents and children.

It's not all about prams, it mostly about needing make enough side-space so the parent can open the doors fully to access child seats, and also to push prams between cars. It's not about prams coming out of the boot.

The alternative is to have no dedicated bays, which would mean people constantly complaining about dings and dents in their car's doors instead.

Bear in mind the car park is usually owned by the store, and they probably have researched it. The cost to them is a single person like you moaning about it on the internet. The benefit to them is it is accommodating to the parent and the child. Parents probably would avoid a particular store without these bays because they would have accessibility problems. Other shoppers might avoid the store for fear of getting dents in their car. It also means that another generation shopper is being conditioned to that particular chain.

Like it or not, the benefits to the store are there.

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I saw this on the front page and had to reply .. if only because it involves that lovely HPC proof place we all know and love .. MAIDSTONE ..

I have five children and a 4x4 .. Quick pause for the wave of hate to calm down ..

In 2006 I was in Maidstone visiting my parents and I had to get something from the supermarket .. So I put my daughter in the centre seat at the front of the Landrover. Seeing the "Mother and baby spaces" at the front of the supermarket I thought "How jolly convienient .." and parked .. before I had even turned off the engine this lady was banging on the window ..

"These spaces are for MOTHERS with children .. "

I just could not be arsed to argue so I just went and parked in the normal parking spaces ..

The scandal is if you'd killed that lady in the car park you'd have been the one who'd have been sent to prison.

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But does not the same apply to disabled people? As long as they have space to get in and out of their vehicle, why the need to be outside the entrance when they are able to travel from their home to the shop, shop in the shop and then get home with their shopping?

If a person is so disabled that an extra 30m makes a difference, why are they shopping in the first place?

It really annoys me that so many empty spaces are created by allocated disabled parking, and those that are occupied are not disabled anyway!

I know of a so called disabled person who has just had an allocated parking space outside the front of their home - she lives in a flat on the 1st floor with no lift! Where's the effing logic in that?

Speaking personally, I don't visit supermarkets very often - I simply can't walk far enough. On my good days, it's helpful to be able to park near the shop - not so far to walk. A trip to the supermarket can be utterly exhausting for me.

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Speaking personally, I don't visit supermarkets very often - I simply can't walk far enough. On my good days, it's helpful to be able to park near the shop - not so far to walk. A trip to the supermarket can be utterly exhausting for me.

There is a Tesco near me that is so large it is exhausting to walk around. I do not visit it now apart from, as they did lastm month, sent me loads of vouchers to get me to go there. I think there is a limit to the size of shop that people will walk around.

You would think that people would be thinner after walking around such places weekly but most seem to move at the pace of snails so little or no energy is burned... especially if they are opening food and stuffing it in their faces as they wander around.

I actually get anxious in the above-mentioned Tesco store sometimes - it is enormous.

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I think everybody is happy for parents with children and people with disabilities to have large reserved parking spaces within sensible walking distance of the doors.

The only thing that annoys everybody involved is when people take the piss.

I'd love to see a TV program where people leaping out of cars in the disabled/family spots are accosted by a presenter with a camera.

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Speaking personally, I don't visit supermarkets very often - I simply can't walk far enough. On my good days, it's helpful to be able to park near the shop - not so far to walk. A trip to the supermarket can be utterly exhausting for me.

There is a Tesco near me that is so large it is exhausting to walk around. I do not visit it now apart from, as they did lastm month, sent me loads of vouchers to get me to go there. I think there is a limit to the size of shop that people will walk around.

You would think that people would be thinner after walking around such places weekly but most seem to move at the pace of snails so little or no energy is burned... especially if they are opening food and stuffing it in their faces as they wander around.

I actually get anxious in the above-mentioned Tesco store sometimes - it is enormous.

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Where I am, the parent and child bays are pretty much full all of the time - with parents and children.

It's not all about prams, it mostly about needing make enough side-space so the parent can open the doors fully to access child seats, and also to push prams between cars. It's not about prams coming out of the boot.

snip

have to take issue with this....are shopping trolleys wider than prams? and who is pushing the pram when mummy has a trolly?

We ALL need the extra space.

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Speaking personally, I don't visit supermarkets very often - I simply can't walk far enough. On my good days, it's helpful to be able to park near the shop - not so far to walk. A trip to the supermarket can be utterly exhausting for me.

Maybe if you dressed more sensibly than in the picture ;)

Seriously though, the one thing that's clearly right about supermarket parking is the provision of disabled spaces - and enough of them to ensure it's unlikely they'll all fill up and risk denying access to the next disabled person.

The rest of us are perfectly capable of walking, and shouldn't expect parking to be provided at the expense of the store, and hence of shoppers :angry:

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The scandal is if you'd killed that lady in the car park you'd have been the one who'd have been sent to prison.

Oddly I learn't something quite terrible about myself in a similar situation .. I'd always assumed myself totally incapable of killing someone .. When I was 21 (in 1991) I used to look after a friends daughter who was 6 years old and very seriously disabled. I was putting her into the back of my tatty Renault 16 when a bloke came over .. I guess mid 20's casually dressed and said .. "What happened did you F**K your sister?" I was kinda stunned for a second and I just watched him walking away .. He was gone before a sort of "Red mist" decended and I wanted to kill him .. I sat in the car for about 20 minetes and eventually calmed down ..

Now that I'm a grown-up I realise several things ..

Had it been my child I would have run after him with the tyre jack and smashed his head in ...

If I'd been on jury service and a case like this had come up and assuming the circumstances were the same I could only find the killer guilty of manslaughter at the most .. but possibly not guilty at all ..

The guy MUST have been mentally ill ..

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  • 149 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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