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Usa Bank Foreclosures In Photos And Prices

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I've figured out why there is not a Stateside equivalent to HPC.co.UK

They don't need one.

Rochester New York.

£23,388.55

foreclosure-1499083-93359.jpg

Rochester New York

£52,392.03 [Offer £43k?] :0)

auction-1371881-57790.jpg

Rochester New York

£13,657.29 [Offer £10k?] :0)

foreclosure-1549621-31629.jpg

Rochester New York

£8,920.385 [[!!]]

foreclosure-1277843-9306sv.jpg

Schenectady New York

£24,703.37

foreclosure-1608186-10707.jpg

Schenectady New York

£6,175.69

foreclosure-1605879-36403sv.jpg

Florida Lee County

£34,326.17

foreclosure-1607807-28400.jpg

Edited by Dan1

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Florida Lee County

£30,583.31

foreclosure-1603412-27807.jpg

Florida: Lee County

£31,767.68

foreclosure-1589632-10103.jpg

Florida: Lee County

£23,654.01

foreclosure-1589625-30218.jpg

Florida: Santa Rosa

43,060.08

foreclosure-1526380-86636.jpg

Florida: Lake City

£36,204.64

foreclosure-1551290-2979.jpg

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Florida: Lake City

£52,366.78

foreclosure-1606686-31982sv.jpg

Florida: Cape Coral

£48,191.64

foreclosure-1360225-80368.jpg

Florida :Cape Coral

£31,109.77 [Offer £25k? Without grinning at the seller?] :0)

foreclosure-1605281-82899.jpg

Florida: Fort Lauderdale

£37,382.06

foreclosure-1598543-95503.jpg

Florida: Fort Lauderdale

£18,661.41

foreclosure-1598546-75899.jpg

Niagra Falls, New York:

£6,239.754

auction-1391799-88313.jpg

There are many many examples of Bank Foreclosures in every State, I just picked a few at random.

USA house Prices are still falling.

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Prices in the US went straight up and then down with the availability of credit. The difference with the UK is over the relative supply of housing.

I see that places like Portland, OR which have planning restrictions still have much higher prices than the national average. Conversely prices in Houston which has the loosest planning laws on the planet haven't changed since 2007. $150,000 for a likely 2,000 square foot home.

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Incredible isn't it.

Would be life changing if we had anything approaching that.

OH GOD YES. :)

[FTB'er?

Got a trade?

Got a degree?

Dig out your passports, and get a Visa.]

Edited by Dan1

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There are many many examples of Bank Foreclosures in every State, I just picked a few at random.

Then do some more. You can show peeps net lending figs and UK debt stock redemtion profiles til yer blue in the face and guess how much attention they'll pay. But show them what looks like their house selling for 1/10th of the price in the world's largest ecomony .. now that makes them start to wonder.

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Then do some more. You can show peeps net lending figs and UK debt stock redemtion profiles til yer blue in the face and guess how much attention they'll pay. But show them what looks like their house selling for 1/10th of the price in the world's largest ecomony .. now that makes them start to wonder.

I will keep posting. Gives me some hope looking at them. B)

Edited by Dan1

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Part of me says, 'theyre just glorified sheds, timber frame and shoddily built'

but thats balanced by the fact most have top of the range (in UK terms) granite and marble, wooden staircases, fully airconditioned, jacuzzi, electric garage doors and endless other amenities.

Plus places like Florida and Rust belt NY have crashed as hard as anywhere. Places near NYC, and desirable parts of big cities like San Diego you can still pay $1million plus for a fairly modest home.

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LOL :lol: MoneySpinner. Fantastic Equivalents.

Edited by Dan1

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Na, life is just 10x better here in the UK.

EDIT:

The National Average Wage in the UK in 2007 was £23,764 PA

The National Average Wage in the USA in 2007 was £22,578.29 PA

@ 2007 Exchange Rate of $2/£1

*Note the National Average Wage is a median figure, where 50% of employees earn more and 50% earn less*

Edited by Dan1

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They are cheap , very very cheap , only thing is if you go and live there and buy one if you ever need to sell it to settle your medical bills when the insurance has run out they won't buy much medical care.

There are good things and bad things about U.K. and U.S.A. we might moan about the NHS , but I bet those without basic medical care over there could look on a web site and compare in green envy at the care we get which is free at the point of use, in the same way we are looking at their cheap housing.

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They are cheap , very very cheap , only thing is if you go and live there and buy one if you ever need to sell it to settle your medical bills when the insurance has run out they won't buy much medical care.

There are good things and bad things about U.K. and U.S.A. we might moan about the NHS , but I bet those without basic medical care over there could look on a web site and compare in green envy at the care we get which is free at the point of use, in the same way we are looking at their cheap housing.

50 million in the US without health insurance. That's about 15% of the population so about the same as the working age benefit claimants here. Many people would take those odds and have a much higher standard of living in the US.

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Supplemental:

The National Average Wage in the UK in 2007 was £23,764 PA

The National Average Wage in the USA in 2007 was £28,156 PA

*Note the National Average Wage is a median figure, where 50% of employees earn more and 50% earn less*

...the difference is probably greater now as the GBP exchange rate against the USD has weakened since then.... :rolleyes:

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50 million in the US without health insurance. That's about 15% of the population so about the same as the working age benefit claimants here. Many people would take those odds and have a much higher standard of living in the US.

There was a thread on here recently and U.S.A. health care came up, a guy who had lived over there said the whole system was abysmal.

Many of the 85% that you state who have health care find how little they are covered for when they need to claim. Many people are covered via their jobs, so job goes , and along with the earnings so does the health care. Think about suddenly being made redundant and having to worrie about one of your kids falling ill on top of being broke.

He also gave a figure can not remember the exact numbers about people going bankrupt, he stated that a very high number of people went bankrupt due to medical bills and a very high number of those had insurance, however the insurance ran out prior to the treatment needed ending.

There is lot's and lot's worng with their system. The 85% covered have not got anywhere near the unlimited cover that we enjoy here . Also if someone is not stupid over here the older they get the less they should owe on their house the burden get's less with age. With U.S.A. health insurance the older you get the more expensive it get's.

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There was a thread on here recently and U.S.A. health care came up, a guy who had lived over there said the whole system was abysmal.

Many of the 85% that you state who have health care find how little they are covered for when they need to claim. Many people are covered via their jobs, so job goes , and along with the earnings so does the health care. Think about suddenly being made redundant and having to worrie about one of your kids falling ill on top of being broke.

He also gave a figure can not remember the exact numbers about people going bankrupt, he stated that a very high number of people went bankrupt due to medical bills and a very high number of those had insurance, however the insurance ran out prior to the treatment needed ending.

There is lot's and lot's worng with their system. The 85% covered have not got anywhere near the unlimited cover that we enjoy here . Also if someone is not stupid over here the older they get the less they should owe on their house the burden get's less with age. With U.S.A. health insurance the older you get the more expensive it get's.

I agree with everything you wrote except for the oldies because until the money runs out they can claim on Medicaid. But another factor is that if you are only spending 10% of gross income on housing in the US you can make extra provisions via insurance against medical catastrophe.

That most over there don't is just an indication of either their lack of intelligence or congenital optimism.

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Prices in the US went straight up and then down with the availability of credit. The difference with the UK is over the relative supply of housing.

I see that places like Portland, OR which have planning restrictions still have much higher prices than the national average. Conversely prices in Houston which has the loosest planning laws on the planet haven't changed since 2007. $150,000 for a likely 2,000 square foot home.

It's a pickle.

In Ireland the solution to crazy house prices ten years ago was to free up planning permissions. Result: insane house prices + ghost estates. Proof that loose credit is the real cause?

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It's a pickle.

In Ireland the solution to crazy house prices ten years ago was to free up planning permissions. Result: insane house prices + ghost estates. Proof that loose credit is the real cause?

I don't deny that loose credit was necessary for the kind of HPI we've seen, but you can't ignore the supply side and just look at prices now in Ireland and the US compared to here.

And who has taken the hit on all those ghost estates and the 20 million empty homes in the US?

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  • 144 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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