Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

St Article Says Civil Servants Can Retire At 50 To Get Cuts Through


Recommended Posts

Because if they used a figure of say £19k pa or so, the answer would be much more realistic & not have the shock value the poster wanted !! lol.

I was quoting the figures given in the S Times article, rather than embellishing for effect as you imply.

The median salaries in several very important PS sectors is shown in this taxpayers alliance graph:

public-sector-pay-compariso.gif

And it's the 50+ who will be most likely to be at senior levels i.e. well above the median.

For example, the Telegraph claims on 19 Sep 2010 that:

In a stark illustration of the financial rewards available to workers in the NHS, schools and police forces, the study found a total of 9,187 earning more than the £142,500 paid to David Cameron There are also 38,000 who earn more than £100,000 a year.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 50
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

My wife works at HMRC and the promotion ranks are known as "bands". AFAIK 7 is the lowest band and 1 the highest. My wife is a 4 and her salary scale matches the 'officer' grade in your post. In her department a 3 is a Chartered Surveyor and a band 2 is in charge of the whole office. A band 1 would be someone in a top post at the regional headquarters.

i made the HMRC data from that spreadsheet into a chart.

hmrch.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

"that said, they have hugely more staff in lower pay grades - 64,528 below grade 7 if I'm reading it right. the most that any of them could be on is, I'd say, about £45k [although I'm not an expert]. I don't fully understand but they have 7,774 'admin assistants' [payscale £14k to £19k] and the most common grade [28,000 staff] by a distance seems to be 'assistant officer', payscale £17k to £24k, closely followed by 'officer' [16,000 staff], payscale £23k to £30k"

Just for clarity, the wages quoted above are the London payscales, which add approx £5k onto the actual national salary levels of these 3 grades.

Edited by jaynewcastle
Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife works at HMRC and the promotion ranks are known as "bands". AFAIK 7 is the lowest band and 1 the highest. My wife is a 4 and her salary scale matches the 'officer' grade in your post. In her department a 3 is a Chartered Surveyor and a band 2 is in charge of the whole office. A band 1 would be someone in a top post at the regional headquarters.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife works at HMRC and the promotion ranks are known as "bands". AFAIK 7 is the lowest band and 1 the highest. My wife is a 4 and her salary scale matches the 'officer' grade in your post. In her department a 3 is a Chartered Surveyor and a band 2 is in charge of the whole office. A band 1 would be someone in a top post at the regional headquarters.

I work at HMRC and the confusion is over "7". They don't have "bands" anymore. The "bands" were how the old Customs & Excise graded. The combined new department with the Inland Revenue have carried on using the IR grading system. This is how it is: AA (clerical assistant - old band 2/3), AO (assistant officer - old band 3/4), "O" (officer - old band 6), "HO" (higher officer - old band 7), SO (senior officer - old band 9), Grade7, Grade6. Grade7's & 6's are senior civil service.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Giving PS workers early retirement wont help.

The 60% final salary pension plus other benefits roughly equates to the post tax/deductions money they are receiving now.

No savings, but less staff.

The CSR hasn't addressed the problem that salaries rocketed under New Labour. In Ireland their public sector have had pay cuts ranging from -5% to -15%. Over here we will now have job cuts to make "savings" but all the cuts are doing is protecting salaries that are too high. There is no need for any job cuts or cuts to frontline services just claw back the excessive pay, the bigger the pay rise since 1999 the bigger the pay cut now.

Take the BBC as an example. Grey Dyke has stated that Mark Thompson's £860k is more than twice what he got for doing the same job. Knock 50% of that £860k and that saves £430k to save lots of jobs and services.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The CSR hasn't addressed the problem that salaries rocketed under New Labour. In Ireland their public sector have had pay cuts ranging from -5% to -15%. Over here we will now have job cuts to make "savings" but all the cuts are doing is protecting salaries that are too high. There is no need for any job cuts or cuts to frontline services just claw back the excessive pay, the bigger the pay rise since 1999 the bigger the pay cut now.

Take the BBC as an example. Grey Dyke has stated that Mark Thompson's £860k is more than twice what he got for doing the same job. Knock 50% of that £860k and that saves £430k to save lots of jobs and services.

Exactly!

Why does it seem to be beyond the capability of the government to do something about this? It would have popular support and be minimally disruptive.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

Game over on that front. I beleive some can still take it at 50 but massively reduced, 5% per year for every year under 60.

good, that'll stop some of the 40-something coonts I know getting what they've been blabbering on about expecting for years

Link to post
Share on other sites

When did this ever happen ?. Even 15 years ago, when I started working, you lost 5% of your small annual pension for every year you retired early.

it was because the incoming govt in 2010 could not afford for the public sector strikes to start early in 2010 as civil service redundancies were announced, so a deal was struck

workers' solidarity and all that

Edited by Si1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like another raid on the general taxpayer's in the offing in order to 'quell civil service revolts against plans to axe 610,000 civil servant and council workers' e.g. public sector (PS) workers from the taxpayers payroll. The gov may offer PS workers over 50 full access to their final salary pension from the age of 50, such that a PS worker who's on £60k pa may retire on £40k pa from the age of 50. To qualify they must:

  • waive lump sum payment of 1 months pay per year worked
  • started working in PS before 2006

About 100,000 PS workers may qualify. I'm guessing that a shed load of 'em will be back in the PS as consultants within a couple of years, or will be undercutting private sector workers for work due to the 2 or 3k PM they'll have coming in.

One justification for the largess with taxpayers money is,according to a Cabinet Office spokesperson "This is to recognise the years of service they have given and the financial commitments they have to maintain" (that'll include huge mortgages and school fees I guess) and "The best employers in the public and private sector offer similar packages." (so they don't pick the terms offered to say, Tesco shelf stacker's, they pick those offered to say, bankers, and set the benchmark against them.

Still, it's only somebody else's (borrowed) money. And one assumes that the savings will be limited if they're drawing a full pension for the next 20 to 40 years.

Edit to add clarification

Hush money to stop them spilling the beans about all the corruption and corrupt practices they see daily passing over their desks?

(Think Andrea Hill - Orwellian Suffolk Council bod who paid out over £500,000 of Suffolk ratepayers cash to shut head office staff up about her 'dealings')

Or

Masonic favoritism to freemason non-workers promoted beyond their skill levels cos they is part of the bruvver-hoodies!

Link to post
Share on other sites

it was because the incoming govt in 2010 could not afford for the public sector strikes to start early in 2010 as civil service redundancies were announced, so a deal was struck

workers' solidarity and all that

You're missing the point, Civil servants haven''t been allowed to retire early & still get a full pension.

Link to post
Share on other sites

i made the HMRC data from that spreadsheet into a chart.

hmrch.jpg

Just for clarity, the wages quoted above are the London payscales, which add approx £5k onto the actual national salary levels of these 3 grades.

The OP seems somewhat sensationalist when these figures are digested.

Link to post
Share on other sites

according to the stories at the time it was a special deal in lieu of redundancy

According to the story, Jack grew a giant beanstalk and was chased by a giant when he stole a chicken that laid golden eggs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 429 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.