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Kyoto

My Pragmatic Spending Review

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I think I'm disappointed in todays spending review as I was hoping for something a lot more pragmatic.... something fairer and based more on 'common sense'.... something that more accurately reflects the mood of the nation.

I'm not sure what the figures are like, but if George Osborne read out a list like the following, even the people affected would begrudgingly accept that they were necessary and fair. There would be no winners and no groups would really be singled out. Indeed, I would personally really get behind something like this.

  • 3% cuts across the board per year as a base line, no consultations, no winners, no losers;
  • Limit all public sector salaries to no higher than that of the prime minister;
  • Scrap ALL benefits for high earners or those with substantial savings;
  • Mobilise people on benefits, getting them involved in community projects;
  • Ruthlessly reduce management across the board in NHS, Councils, Police Force, protecting front line workers;
  • Increase income tax by 1p or 2p in the pound across the board;
  • Vast simplification of tax and benefit system - combining and reducing administration;
  • Wage freeze and hiring freeze across public sector;
  • Ruthlessly look for efficiencies via mergers - police forces, councils, back office services;
  • Ruthlessly look to outsource to the private sector where real value can be demonstrated;
  • Reform housing benefit and social housing;
  • A pragmatic review of 'what the state really needs to do', a national debate about how to shrink the state and its responsibilities;
  • Radical reform of the BBC, cutting back down it's public sector remit and reducing the license fee;
  • Absolutely hammer the banks who contributed to credit crunch with special levies;
  • Force non doms and tax avoiders to take a bath;
  • Government to take steps to reduce housing costs which are out of hand (OK I'm a slight VI here);
  • Adjust benefits so work always pays MORE than benefit, not the same as currently planned;
  • Unwind banking guarantees, putting more risk back onto private sector investors.

So there's a list of 15 or so of what I think are really simple and fair changes that would add up to billions in savings.

After months of buttering the nation up, I reckon there would be enough political will to squeeze that lot through, starting it all from next week instead of over 4 years. This would then be a good base line to start discussing further cuts next year.

Any other 'pragmatic' cuts that you would like to see? Nothing too crazy and HPC like - just sensible things which they would get past the electorate with people accepting it as necessary.

Edited by Kyoto

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I see tax take increasing with tax rate until an indeterminable point and then it going down.

There is no evidence that we have ever had a tax rate on the side of the Laffer curve beloved of people in favour of tax cuts.

All empirical evidence shows tax cuts for the richest lead to lower tax take from the rich.

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I think I'm disappointed in todays spending review as I was hoping for something a lot more pragmatic.... something fairer and based more on 'common sense'.... something that more accurately reflects the mood of the nation.

I'm not sure what the figures are like, but if George Osborne read out a list like the following, even the people affected would begrudgingly accept that they were necessary and fair. There would be no winners and no groups would really be singled out. Indeed, I would personally really get behind something like this.

  • 3% cuts across the board per year as a base line, no consultations, no winners, no losers;

  • Limit all public sector salaries to no higher than that of the prime minister;

  • Scrap ALL benefits for high earners or those with substantial savings;

  • Mobilise people on benefits, getting them involved in community projects;

  • Ruthlessly reduce management across the board in NHS, Councils, Police Force, protecting front line workers;

  • Increase income tax by 1p or 2p in the pound across the board;

  • Vast simplification of tax and benefit system - combining and reducing administration;

  • Wage freeze and hiring freeze across public sector;

  • Ruthlessly look for efficiencies via mergers - police forces, councils, back office services;

  • Ruthlessly look to outsource to the private sector where real value can be demonstrated;

  • Reform housing benefit and social housing;

  • A pragmatic review of 'what the state really needs to do', a national debate about how to shrink the state and its responsibilities;

  • Radical reform of the BBC, cutting back down it's public sector remit and reducing the license fee;

  • Absolutely hammer the banks who contributed to credit crunch with special levies;

  • Force non doms and tax avoiders to take a bath;

  • Government to take steps to reduce housing costs which are out of hand (OK I'm a slight VI here);

  • Adjust benefits so work always pays MORE than benefit, not the same as currently planned;

  • Unwind banking guarantees, putting more risk back onto private sector investors.

So there's a list of 15 or so of what I think are really simple and fair changes that would add up to billions in savings.

After months of buttering the nation up, I reckon there would be enough political will to squeeze that lot through, starting it all from next week instead of over 4 years. This would then be a good base line to start discussing further cuts next year.

Any other 'pragmatic' cuts that you would like to see? Nothing too crazy and HPC like - just sensible things which they would get past the electorate with people accepting it as necessary.

I like the idea of being pragmatic but there are some obvious problems. for example imposing very reasonable pay restrictions on high paid government workers such as hospital consultants and nurse managers; but i think the problem is of contracts. even if 99% of staff within an indiustry agreed you'd only need one to object and the legal costs would be tremendous.

Same with the 'bankster' even though they have robbed us blind are so footloose they can move their business to the middle east and far east within days. banks have been an evil influence for 300 yrs but now they are biting their own home nations. i don't think we can actually get at them.

the reality is that there are very few re\ally'poor' people in this country and so many of our problems is the 'dependency'culture and at least osbourne is attempting to confront this although the proof will be in the results rather then words

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I think I'm disappointed in todays spending review as I was hoping for something a lot more pragmatic.... something fairer and based more on 'common sense'.... something that more accurately reflects the mood of the nation.

I'm not sure what the figures are like, but if George Osborne read out a list like the following, even the people affected would begrudgingly accept that they were necessary and fair. There would be no winners and no groups would really be singled out. Indeed, I would personally really get behind something like this.

  • 3% cuts across the board per year as a base line, no consultations, no winners, no losers;

  • Limit all public sector salaries to no higher than that of the prime minister;

  • Scrap ALL benefits for high earners or those with substantial savings;

  • Mobilise people on benefits, getting them involved in community projects;

  • Ruthlessly reduce management across the board in NHS, Councils, Police Force, protecting front line workers;

  • Increase income tax by 1p or 2p in the pound across the board;

  • Vast simplification of tax and benefit system - combining and reducing administration;

  • Wage freeze and hiring freeze across public sector;

  • Ruthlessly look for efficiencies via mergers - police forces, councils, back office services;

  • Ruthlessly look to outsource to the private sector where real value can be demonstrated;

  • Reform housing benefit and social housing;

  • A pragmatic review of 'what the state really needs to do', a national debate about how to shrink the state and its responsibilities;

  • Radical reform of the BBC, cutting back down it's public sector remit and reducing the license fee;

  • Absolutely hammer the banks who contributed to credit crunch with special levies;

  • Force non doms and tax avoiders to take a bath;

  • Government to take steps to reduce housing costs which are out of hand (OK I'm a slight VI here);

  • Adjust benefits so work always pays MORE than benefit, not the same as currently planned;

  • Unwind banking guarantees, putting more risk back onto private sector investors.

I think the last one is utter nonsense.

Just why do you think that the guarentee is in place?

tim

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Not so sure about this, why should the base rate of income tax be so sacred? I'd happily pay a penny or two extra in income tax if it was well spent.

::cough cough:: :rolleyes::ph34r:

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I think, Kyoto, your suggestions carry a great deal of common sense and have a large amount of merit to them. They do have a lot of ideas that mean that you are looking at motivating people into work, off benefit, to remove tiers that are non-productive, and look to consolidate where feasible.

Unfortunately you're overlooking one thing. And that is, that politicians are a bunch of utter twats.

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All empirical evidence shows tax cuts for the richest lead to lower tax take from the rich.

Not sure what evidence you have tried to find then, as the tax take increased when the Thatcher government abolished the 90% tax rate left by Labour in the seventies.

There is lots of evidence to show that low tax economies are often the most successful.

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-Allow the housing market to collapse

-Leave the EU

-Adjust the immigration policy so that jobs are only offered to those on HSV if there definitely isn't somebody who is equally skilled and -already legally residing in the UK on a permanent basis.

-Scrap the bailouts to failed banks and use the money to build a high speed rail network and the Severn Barrage tidal power scheme.

-Re nationalise all energy supply and infrastructure

-Allow farmers to grow whatever they want

-Impose heavy tariffs on imported foodstuffs that are undercutting local production

-Make working worthwhile by introducing policies that are geared towards lowering the overall cost of living (point number 1 is a good start)

-Allow brownfields sites to be sold off for independent housing development with planning permission pre-agreed

-Phased and meaningful lowering of income tax and corresponding increase consumption tax on luxury items

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I think the last one is utter nonsense.

Just why do you think that the guarentee is in place?

tim

to allow a massive and unsustainable expansion of credit?

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  • 142 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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