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How Much Information Should/can I Request Pre-Offer?

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first time buyer, and first time poster, so grateful for any information any of you experts can provide:

i am looking to put an offer in on flat in a mansion block in Balham, SW London, and after some reading of these forums and a few other sources, i am seeing a common thread of concerns over who is the freeholder of a given property, and thus what a leaseholder is liable to pay on an ongoing basis (such as repairs to building etc.). The flat i am looking at has 81 years left on the lease (and i understand that leases with fewer than 80 years can be more expensive to renew), and so my question is as to whether i can request to see the lease to see terms/contact freeholder about extension prior to putting in an offer. I have details of ground rent and service charge, both of which seem reasonable, but if i am going to be face with a large bill for a lease extension and further large costs for building maintenance work, this would obviously greatly alter my offer for the property.

any thoughts on how i should proceed???

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first time buyer, and first time poster, so grateful for any information any of you experts can provide:

i am looking to put an offer in on flat in a mansion block in Balham, SW London, and after some reading of these forums and a few other sources, i am seeing a common thread of concerns over who is the freeholder of a given property, and thus what a leaseholder is liable to pay on an ongoing basis (such as repairs to building etc.). The flat i am looking at has 81 years left on the lease (and i understand that leases with fewer than 80 years can be more expensive to renew), and so my question is as to whether i can request to see the lease to see terms/contact freeholder about extension prior to putting in an offer. I have details of ground rent and service charge, both of which seem reasonable, but if i am going to be face with a large bill for a lease extension and further large costs for building maintenance work, this would obviously greatly alter my offer for the property.

any thoughts on how i should proceed???

You're unlikey to get definitive information about extending the lease at this point. Freeholders can (and often do) ignore unofficial requests and if you make an official request you start to clock up freeholder costs which you may have to pay.

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first time buyer, and first time poster, so grateful for any information any of you experts can provide:

i am looking to put an offer in on flat in a mansion block in Balham, SW London, and after some reading of these forums and a few other sources, i am seeing a common thread of concerns over who is the freeholder of a given property, and thus what a leaseholder is liable to pay on an ongoing basis (such as repairs to building etc.). The flat i am looking at has 81 years left on the lease (and i understand that leases with fewer than 80 years can be more expensive to renew), and so my question is as to whether i can request to see the lease to see terms/contact freeholder about extension prior to putting in an offer. I have details of ground rent and service charge, both of which seem reasonable, but if i am going to be face with a large bill for a lease extension and further large costs for building maintenance work, this would obviously greatly alter my offer for the property.

any thoughts on how i should proceed???

This is for your solicitor to deal with. Part of their job is to read the lease and advise you of any nasties lurking in it before you sign! Get them to go through the pros and cons of extending the term with you.

You need to be very wary of who your freeholder is, and whether there are loopholes in the lease that would enable them to shaft you royally (e.g. do you have unlimited liability for whatever they care to spend?) If the freeholder is a management company owned by you and fellow-leaseholders you should be OK. If not, be VERY wary!

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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