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Snp To Cut Nhs Management By 25%

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-11555811

The number of senior NHS bosses in Scotland will be cut by a quarter in the next four years, Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon has announced.

She said the move would help fund policies such as SNP plans to abolish prescription charges by next April.

Ms Sturgeon told the SNP conference the cut was part of health department savings to free up £100m a year.

But she said frontline NHS spending would be protected, in the face of UK spending cuts.

Addressing delegates in Perth, the deputy SNP leader also rallied party supporters, ahead of next May's Holyrood election.

Ms Sturgeon said that, with the costs of healthcare rising fast, the NHS was facing financial challenges and would have to continue to make tough efficiency savings, without compromising patient care.

She said: "Over the lifetime of the next parliament, health boards will be expected to cut the number of senior managers by 25%.

"Not because we don't value the work that managers do, but because when budgets are tight we must spend every penny that we possibly can directly on patient care.

It will be interesting to see if they manage this.

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"Not because we don't value the work that managers do, but because when budgets are tight we must spend every penny that we possibly can directly on patient care.

Because obviously when money is not tight it's fine to blow it on all sorts of garbage.

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In England, GP consortia will effectively replace PCTs while doing the work for 25% of the current PCT costs - a cut of 75%

This will prove impossible if consortia are forced to assume the liability associated with hiring/ firing PCT workers and managers, an outcome that seems likely (and is costly under TUPE legislation)

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My ex is a nurse, she says that ward after ward at her workplace has closed since she started her training in the 1980s and patients been replaced with dozens and dozens office staff, all walking on the most expensive carpeting imaginable... my current gf works at the same hospital, they have just paid £30,000 (thirty thousand pounds) for a bespoke desk built by a local general builder... it really is just a desk.

My ex worked in an office with three other women. She worked there over a year and never found out what her job was, all they used to do all day was sit around talking about last night's telly. There were four computers in her office, all top-of-the-range. One day all four were replaced with brand new ones even though they were less than a year old.

When she asked why they were getting four new computers when they only ever used one, she was told "If we don't spend all our budget it will be cut next year".

She couldn't stand it and went back to blood 'n guts nursing on the wards.

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My ex is a nurse, she says that ward after ward at her workplace has closed since she started her training in the 1980s and patients been replaced with dozens and dozens office staff, all walking on the most expensive carpeting imaginable... my current gf works at the same hospital, they have just paid £30,000 (thirty thousand pounds) for a bespoke desk built by a local general builder... it really is just a desk.

My ex worked in an office with three other women. She worked there over a year and never found out what her job was, all they used to do all day was sit around talking about last night's telly. There were four computers in her office, all top-of-the-range. One day all four were replaced with brand new ones even though they were less than a year old.

When she asked why they were getting four new computers when they only ever used one, she was told "If we don't spend all our budget it will be cut next year".

She couldn't stand it and went back to blood 'n guts nursing on the wards.

How many times have I also heard exactly the same....not interested in any kind of savings, only spending so to get more next year. :ph34r:

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In Scotland the NHS doesn't have a "bonus" culture like in the rest of the UK.

They only do their looting via "non-consolidated" payments:

Although the NHS does not formally recognise the word “bonus” as part of employee remuneration, senior staff are entitled to “non-consolidated” payments.

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/health/senior-nhs-staff-angry-as-sturgeon-axes-their-bonuses-1.1013190

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My ex is a nurse, she says that ward after ward at her workplace has closed since she started her training in the 1980s and patients been replaced with dozens and dozens office staff, all walking on the most expensive carpeting imaginable... my current gf works at the same hospital, they have just paid £30,000 (thirty thousand pounds) for a bespoke desk built by a local general builder... it really is just a desk.

My ex worked in an office with three other women. She worked there over a year and never found out what her job was, all they used to do all day was sit around talking about last night's telly. There were four computers in her office, all top-of-the-range. One day all four were replaced with brand new ones even though they were less than a year old.

When she asked why they were getting four new computers when they only ever used one, she was told "If we don't spend all our budget it will be cut next year".

I wonder where they sell on all that stuff when it's replaced.

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When she asked why they were getting four new computers when they only ever used one, she was told "If we don't spend all our budget it will be cut next year".

I thought everyone knew that's how the public sector 'works'.

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How many times have I also heard exactly the same....not interested in any kind of savings, only spending so to get more next year. :ph34r:

Meanwhile, front-line departments, who are strapped for cash, get told to make savings - or obstructed in their procurement of new resources.

Where I work at present, we've been told there has been an IT freeze - no new computers. The trouble is that the computers are already very old, and they're trying to computerise much more - and the computers are struggling to cope, and with all the data theft fiascos recently, the computers are stuffed full of security and anti-=virus software, that they were never designed to cope with. I had to give an educational lecture to medical staff. I was a bit busy, so arrived at the seminar room only 5 minutes before the lecture was due to start. I booted up the computer and waited to begin my lecture, with powerpoint slides. It took 17 minutes (I timed it) before the computer had booted up to the point that the slides could appear (and that wasn't the end of it - I lost my place several times, because there was a delay of 20 seconds between pressing 'next slide' and the slide actually coming up).

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It took 17 minutes (I timed it) before the computer had booted up to the point that the slides could appear (and that wasn't the end of it - I lost my place several times, because there was a delay of 20 seconds between pressing 'next slide' and the slide actually coming up).

Double the memory in them (cheap) and they will be fine again.

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Perhaps we should cut the number of MPs by 25% ""Not because we don't value the work that [MPs] do, but because when budgets are tight we must spend every penny that we possibly can directly on [public services]."

I can understand why a lot of people who earn comparatively small incomes can be bitter about more senior staff earning more when it is harder to see the direct results of the work they do, I did however expect better from other more senior staff.

I know from my own role that good decision making and management of resources can save huge amounts of money, Perhaps these NHS managers really are excess capacity, if that's the case someone should be asking why this didn't happen earlier. If they're not then it'll cost far more in the end than it saves.

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"Snp To Cut Nhs Management By 25%"

Early in 2010 it was reported that NHS managers were doing some looting with pay rises of up to 20%.

Anger at pay increase for NHS bosses Published Date: 17 January 2010

TOP health service managers were awarded inflation-busting wage increases of up to 20 per cent last year despite calls for curbs on public-sector pay, Scotland on Sunday can reveal.

Individual pay awards rose by as much as £45,000 for executives on the 13 health boards which run the country's hospitals and health services.

http://news.scotsman.com/news/-Anger-at-pay-increase.5988895.jp

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Double the memory in them (cheap) and they will be fine again.

Not necessarily depends on the CPU and how old the PC's are, from the description given upgrading the RAM wouldn't achieve very much.

If they are like the trust PC's we use they also don't get defrag don't quite understand why IT can't just use batch files and either use the inbuilt defraggers or install defraggler or ultra defrag.

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Not necessarily depends on the CPU and how old the PC's are, from the description given upgrading the RAM wouldn't achieve very much.

If they are like the trust PC's we use they also don't get defrag don't quite understand why IT can't just use batch files and either use the inbuilt defraggers or install defraggler or ultra defrag.

If you want the technical details, the PCs are Pentium III or Pentium 4 machines - with 256 MB of RAM (some 512 MB) which run Windows XP. The PCs run so much securityware and crapware (e.g. seperate anti-virus and security software, with additional 'data protection' software which blocks USB sticks, some sort of 'application virtualization' thing, VNC, etc.) that even after a fresh boot, task manager shows a RAM requirement of 600 MB. And that's before running any apps.

When you try and use a clinical application, which are often IE + java based - things just grind to a halt - as neither IE or java are particularly fast or resource efficient.

The other amazing thing is that the hospital recently procured a 'PACS' system - digital X-rays - supplied by connecting for health. The PCs used to view the studies are dedicated PCs, which are basically locked down to run only the viewer app. These PCs were very well specced - dual quad-core Xeons, SAS 15k RAID array, Quadro graphics. But there's a problem - the PCs have dedicated 'medical grade' graphics cards for the main display monitors (supporting fancy 65536 grey level resolutions). These cards don't however, have any 'acceleration', so displaying things like lists, menus, windows, is slow as treacle - if you scroll through a list of examinations - you can see the individual words redrawing as you scroll down - understandable if you need the superior performance of the 65536 grey resolutions. But wait, the viewer software only supports 256 greys - so it would run just fine on a normal graphics card). So what does the £1000 quadro card do? Nothing as far as I can tell - the software just displays bitmap images on screen - that's it. OK, so what about the 8 core of CPU? Nope. The software appears to be single threaded - if you put task manager up, and work the software as hard as you can CPU usage maxes out at 12%. What about the big SAS RAID array? Well, the computers boot quickly - but for security reasons, the software caches nothing to disk - so once, running the array isn't touched. So, what is the performance like generally, if everything is cached to RAM? Well, quite frankly, it's crap. Why? These PCs only have 1 GB of RAM - and a study like a CT scan can easily run to 1.5 GB - so they swapfile like hell, and become totally unusable if you load 2 whole body scans up, so you can compare them. I asked whether there was any way something could be done? I was told that upgrading to 2GB, could be done, but the cost (after all the contractors, middlemen, vendors, etc. had taken their cut) would by £700 + VAT per machine. This was regarded as too expensive, and management wouldn't justify an upgrade to such a new system.

Edited by ChumpusRex

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If you want the technical details, the PCs are Pentium III or Pentium 4 machines - with 256 MB of RAM (some 512 MB) which run Windows XP. The PCs run so much securityware and crapware (e.g. seperate anti-virus and security software, with additional 'data protection' software which blocks USB sticks, some sort of 'application virtualization' thing, VNC, etc.) that even after a fresh boot, task manager shows a RAM requirement of 600 MB. And that's before running any apps.

Complete junk, ram will do nothing for these machines, we had some at work with 1.5gb of ram inside and they where very slow P4 1.6ghz, I've got rid of all of these at work.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_4

The Pentium 4 brand refers to Intel's line of single-core desktop and laptop central processing units (CPUs) introduced on November 20, 2000[1] and shipped through August 8, 2008[2].

If they are the later models more ram could help, but I'm guessing these are very old machines if your also running PIII as well.

When you try and use a clinical application, which are often IE + java based - things just grind to a halt - as neither IE or java are particularly fast or resource efficient.

The other amazing thing is that the hospital recently procured a 'PACS' system - digital X-rays - supplied by connecting for health. The PCs used to view the studies are dedicated PCs, which are basically locked down to run only the viewer app. These PCs were very well specced - dual quad-core Xeons, SAS 15k RAID array, Quadro graphics. But there's a problem - the PCs have dedicated 'medical grade' graphics cards for the main display monitors (supporting fancy 65536 grey level resolutions). These cards don't however, have any 'acceleration', so displaying things like lists, menus, windows, is slow as treacle - if you scroll through a list of examinations - you can see the individual words redrawing as you scroll down - understandable if you need the superior performance of the 65536 grey resolutions. But wait, the viewer software only supports 256 greys - so it would run just fine on a normal graphics card). So what does the £1000 quadro card do? Nothing as far as I can tell - the software just displays bitmap images on screen - that's it. OK, so what about the 8 core of CPU? Nope. The software appears to be single threaded - if you put task manager up, and work the software as hard as you can CPU usage maxes out at 12%. What about the big SAS RAID array? Well, the computers boot quickly - but for security reasons, the software caches nothing to disk - so once, running the array isn't touched. So, what is the performance like generally, if everything is cached to RAM? Well, quite frankly, it's crap. Why? These PCs only have 1 GB of RAM - and a study like a CT scan can easily run to 1.5 GB - so they swapfile like hell, and become totally unusable if you load 2 whole body scans up, so you can compare them. I asked whether there was any way something could be done? I was told that upgrading to 2GB, could be done, but the cost (after all the contractors, middlemen, vendors, etc. had taken their cut) would by £700 + VAT per machine. This was regarded as too expensive, and management wouldn't justify an upgrade to such a new system.

I'm sure NHS IT is inhabited by idiots who haven't got a clue, why the hell would putting in more ram suddenly cost £700? I'm sure PC World wouldn't charge that. What are they putting inside the PC gold?

Memory prices Ebuyer

A 2gb memory module is only £30 so christ knows what's getting added on, unless they are pricing up a new PC.

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I'm sure NHS IT is inhabited by idiots who haven't got a clue, why the hell would putting in more ram suddenly cost £700? I'm sure PC World wouldn't charge that. What are they putting inside the PC gold?

Possibly one of the benefits of a PFI ?

You'll probably find that new lightbulbs are £300 each as well ;)

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I thought everyone knew that's how the public sector 'works'.

I was just about to say budget spend when the poster took the words right out of my mouth. Been there, seen it. It's exactly how it works. It's not even an HPC type public sector rant, it actually is what happens.

Double the memory in them (cheap) and they will be fine again.

And take Office 2007 off it, or just run powerpoint viewer instead.

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I thought everyone knew that's how the public sector 'works'.

Historic based budgeting is fairly common in the private sector as well. I've worked in both and seen plenty of it. Zero based budgeting is not much liked by middle management as it actually requires them to do some work and to plan ahead. In a needs driven role like healthcare such planning is near impossible as one cannot forecast how many people will be ill and what their ailment will be. It is (I readily accept) a recipe for over spend and poor financial planning.

NHS managers went to the same business schools as private sector managers. They have the same qualifications and the same general background. By and large they have pretty much the same level of skill and ability.

The NHS has been around since 1948 and has seen many different governments of all political persuasion. None of them have ever had the guts or the skill to move the public sector budgets to zero based budgeting. Cameron will be no different. Even if that vile little git Liam Fox manages to privatise the NHS (over his bosses dead body) it will still gobble up tax based on the money it spent the year previously. Indeed it needs to do so in order to make it generate huge profit for Mr Foxes rich friends who are waiting to get even richer as a result.

I was at Business School in 1992 and my old Accounting lecturer said that zero based budgeting would solve all the NHS problems. I don't doubt he was near to right then, as he is now, if he is still around. (Well its money problems anyway)

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I'm sure NHS IT is inhabited by idiots who haven't got a clue, why the hell would putting in more ram suddenly cost £700? I'm sure PC World wouldn't charge that. What are they putting inside the PC gold?

Memory prices Ebuyer

A 2gb memory module is only £30 so christ knows what's getting added on, unless they are pricing up a new PC.

It was a contractural problem, not a problem whereby the local IT dept couldn't deal with it.

The genuine OEM memory modules needed were about £250-£300 from suppliers like dabs (I checked) - although clones could be obtained for a fraction of that.

However, the trust was tied into a support contract that was absurdly restrictive - and permitted no modifications to the systems (hardware and software) unless performed by the supplier (they weren't even allowed to install anti-virus software, until the entire system was trashed by 'conficker' - after that, the vendor agreed to supply an anti-virus package (at an appropriately inflated price - to reflect 'regression testing'). This was partly due to the fact that the PCs, as they were used for medical diagnosis, were classed as 'medical devices' and regulated as such. So, the upgrade would require the 'system integrator' procuring the RAM module from the software/hardware solution vendor, who would in turn, procure the RAM from the PC OEM. The RAM would then have to be installed by an engineer from the vendor.

There were some very competent local IT staff. The trust employed a physicist to supervise X-ray and radiation safety and usage. He actually wrote the software that preceeded the new solution, as well as a lot of technical software for processing and interpreting scans, etc. His software was brilliant - and was later sold off, making a nice profit for the trust. We were talking about the new system after it was installed, and he asked me what I thought of the overall system. The answer came into my mind immediately. 'It's the worst system I've ever used', I thought, however, not wanting to cause too much upset, given the stress it was causing, I simply said 'It's rather dissapointing.' His reply was quick, 'Oh, really? It's the worst system I've ever used!'

But then, that wasn't that suprising really. No medical, physics or technical (i.e. front line) staff had been consulted over procuring the system. Instead the system integrator (one which you might expect to have a rather accented name) had been given a local monopoly to provide a 'solution', and had been given free reign to source the product. Trusts were given no choice, they had to buy the solution that the integrator offered.

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There were four computers in her office, all top-of-the-range. One day all four were replaced with brand new ones even though they were less than a year old.

When she asked why they were getting four new computers when they only ever used one, she was told "If we don't spend all our budget it will be cut next year".

...the question in any private sector business or tax payer would have been.... what happened to the less than one year old old computers...?.... :rolleyes:

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...the question in any private sector business or tax payer would have been.... what happened to the less than one year old old computers...?.... :rolleyes:

Well i don't know but my guess would be that tonight they are sitting in some minor government office in Zimbabwe or Azerbaijan.

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Double the memory in them (cheap) and they will be fine again.

What? Managers? I didn't know they were upgradeable! :blink:

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Well i don't know but my guess would be that tonight they are sitting in some minor government office in Zimbabwe or Azerbaijan.

...ah... they must have cut the foreign office budgets a few years ago..... :rolleyes:

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